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Discussion Starter #1
Well fellow modelers, cold weather is here in my part of the world at last. I was sitting at my workbench last evening dissappointed that I couldn't get any painting done. So I decided I would see how others here approach this same issue.

I don't have the benefit of a heated garage or spare room in my house for a paint booth so do I spend the winter months just building up kits to paint come spring or do I just hang up my tools?

So my question is "How do you approach model building during the wintertime?"

I'm really interested in how others deal with this issue.

A.U.
 

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I usually spray my primer coat outside...and when the fumes dissapate, I bring the kit inside to dry and then resume painting by hand!
However, my paints, primer cans, etc...are all stored indoors and in a heated room so they are not cold when in use.

Never has been a problem in the past. The house sometimes gets that paint smell somewhat but most of it is gone when I bring it inside.

MMM
 

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Thank you, John! I see they won't be in stock until mid-January, but I think that I'll just have to get one of these!
 

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So my question is "How do you approach model building during the wintertime?"

I'm really interested in how others deal with this issue.

A.U.
I live in an area of the country where, basically, we feel global warming is indeed a myth. it's twenty one below zero at this current time of the day.
and we get this type of weather October- May.

So, I enjoy building model cars, and painting the body when its warm (June, July & August) is the answer. Plus it gives the bodies time to let the paint "gas out". right now I have 15 painted automobile kits waiting to be assembled. the interior buckets, and engines/drivetrain/chassis paint I apply when the car is about to be built, using a brush & bottled paint.
It works for me.
 

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Though I'm in So. Ca, my garage isn't insulated so during the cool months, it can get quite cold in there. Besides wearing a sweatshirt and pants that I don't care if they get paint over them, I have one of those flameless space heaters. It keeps my space in the garage relatively warm for the most part so I can do things in the garage year round.

I do have a paint booth that I purchased several years ago from one of the online hobby suppliers.
 

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I'm not a fan of outdoor painting, winter or summer. I'm blessed with a basement, a drier vent, and a Pace paint booth. You could buy one of these (or a similar item but, the Pace spray booths are, IMHO, the very best quality at a price comparable to other brands), and then work up a drier vent arrangement that you would put in a window whenever you neede to spray indoors.

The idea would be to set up your booth, using the drier vent insert to allow the fumes and overspray to be vented outside. Spray your model in whichever room you need to work in, then pull in the window insert and put the booth away when you're done. Simple, right............? :rolleyes:
 

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I have about 127 different places here I can spray...can't use them though, because that would give away my hiding spaces to my family.
 

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I work in the basement year-round. It's not heated, but the furnace is right around the corner so I get some ambient heat. And I have a tonload of incandescent lights on in the room to throw some more heat. I can't actually use a space heater 'cause it always blows a fuse. :( I still airbrush year-round. I just put a fan on.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks to everyone for all the different ideas that have been shared so far on some possible solutions to my issue.

I usually spray my primer coat outside...and when the fumes dissapate, I bring the kit inside to dry and then resume painting by hand!
MMM
MMM,

I do my main painting by hand also. My main issue has been with the primer ( I use Krylon) and the clear sealer (Testors Dullcote). Both instructions say use above 70º, so I figured it meant that I couldn't spray it when it was 25º out. What brand(s) do you use?

A.U.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'm not a fan of outdoor painting, winter or summer. I'm blessed with a basement, a drier vent, and a Pace paint booth. You could buy one of these (or a similar item but, the Pace spray booths are, IMHO, the very best quality at a price comparable to other brands), and then work up a drier vent arrangement that you would put in a window whenever you neede to spray indoors.

The idea would be to set up your booth, using the drier vent insert to allow the fumes and overspray to be vented outside. Spray your model in whichever room you need to work in, then pull in the window insert and put the booth away when you're done. Simple, right............? :rolleyes:
Thanks Mark for the advise. When I can get the budget to agree, I'll definately will be looking into this.

A.U.
 

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I have a great work shop..I built a spray booth useing a bathroom and dryer vent used 2"blue board put a outide dryer exhaust vent through the the blue board raise the window shut on the blue board,I am good to go.. Just remodeled the kitchen and I am going to use the old range hood on the booth ..I just wish there a couple other modelers in my area I have enough room that 3 of us could work in there at once.Jeff
 

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MMM,

I do my main painting by hand also. My main issue has been with the primer ( I use Krylon) and the clear sealer (Testors Dullcote). Both instructions say use above 70º, so I figured it meant that I couldn't spray it when it was 25º out. What brand(s) do you use?

A.U.
Well, The stuff I have here at the moment is made by Design Master Neutral Gray PRIMER...however, the directions on the rattle can also say to use at 70 degrees. I guess I don't leave the piece outside very long after I spray it...usually only 10-15 minutes and have never had any issues with it drying inside at room tempurature although like I said, I do get some smell but not enough to give me headaches or anything. If you are dealing with 25 degrees...maybe a small paintbooth might be the correct approach.

I can't say I do EVERYTHING by the book!;)

MMM
 
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