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Discussion Starter #1
I need to cast two small parts, in a simple mold (I have the molding clay) but I need a resin or plastic-type material to make the parts. I don't want to buy the two large bottles of Part A and Part B resin. Is there a quick Home Depot, or Wal-Mart type of product for a solution?

I need to make a hand and gun-like repro casting.

Thanks in advance.

Geoff
 

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Epoxy perhaps? Any reason plaster wouldn't work?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Bondo? Is that a two part mix? Or a tube, can, or mix? I remember "bondo" from my teen days (70s) when everyone was bondoing their cars. Same stuff? Also, best place to get it would be?

Thanks, Geoff
 

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Discussion Starter #5
beeblebrox said:
Epoxy perhaps? Any reason plaster wouldn't work?
I was thinking along the same line. But, I was curious if anyone here had ever done anything along this idea. A two part Epoxy seems a good way to go, but which epoxy? There are so many variant types.

Thanks as well...

Geoff
 

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Bondo is a paste, then you add a couple of drops of hardener and mix it in. It is pliable enough to work into a simple mold, hardens pretty fast and easy to sand. Magic sculpt is a 2 part epoxy but not available locally, unless you live near a vendor. Portland and Seattle have Tap plastics and they sell it. Aves is also available online. Hardware stores sell a 2 part plumbers putty thats easy to use. The world is your oyster.
 

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agreed with f91: an epoxy putty is the way to go. try getting some from a plumbing suppy, because the stuff available at the hardware store is often old and very hard to mix and manipulate. the best stuff is aves "apoxie sculpt" (or their "apoxie clay" or "fix -it"... all different varieties of the same stuff) available online at www.avesstudio.com

the uipshot is that you mix the 2 parts of the epoxy putty togther. it feels a lot like a soft plastilina. you'll have anywhere from 30 to 45 mins to manipulate and sculpt it (depending on the type you purchase), in 3 hours its hard, and in 24 hours its totally cured. it gets stiffer as you go during that 30 -45 minute window, so you can refine the shapes, and you can always add more later as it bonds to itself. once its completlyu cured you can sand, carve, or drill it if you wish. the finished part is much harder and less brittle than polymer clays like fimo and sculpy.

its a great way to make a one of a kind plastic part, which eliminates the need for a mold. (i sculpted night life's "lurking vampi" kit entirely in apoxie.)
 

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You can thin body filler [bondo] with fiberglass resin so it will pour. They are both polyester resin. Use either hardener.
 

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Geoff,

I wanted to make bigger ears for my rebuild of Aurora's Dr. Jekyll As Mr. Hyde. So I softened up some modeling clay by warming it in my hands, then I flattened out 2 pieces about 3 inches in diameter and maybe 1/2 inch thick. I pressed the side of a front head half from a Frankenstein kit into each piece of clay, so that I got a good impresseion of each of his ears. Then I brushed a thin coat of vaseline into each impression, just to make sure I could get the castings out without any fuss.

I mixed up some five-minute epoxy and dribbled a little into each mold, filling the impression so that the expoxy just reached the outlines of the ears. I allowed the epoxy to cure for an hour before digging the castings out of the clay. After cleaning the vaseline mold release off the epoxy ears with a little alcohol, they were ready to be glued on Hyde's head.

Unless you need a two-part mold, or the deatil of your castings will be very intricate, I can't think of a better way to make "quick and dirty" parts.
 

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If I have an impromptu mold of some kind I use Durham's Water Putty. Right now I'm casting mushrooms for the Mole People in domed plastic 'capsules' from the coin machine, and flat slabs for nameplates. Just add water. I get it in 4# can. Also has other household uses. Dries hard, drill & sandable, etc.
 

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What dabs said. In fact, Durham's is a great all-around modeling item to have if you're doing any kind of diorama or scenic base at all. It can be mixed thick or thin and textured any number of ways while it's still wet. It cures like plaster of Paris, rather than drying; once hard you can work it almost like wood. It accepts pretty much every finish known to man.

One thing to watch out for: I learned from the example of a friend of mine that you DO NOT want to apply Durham's (or, I would guess, any other water-based product like plaster or Celluclay) to an unfinished wood surface. My buddy did so to one of those plaques that was cut from a section of a tree - you know, the ones with the bark around the edges. Overnight, the wood absorbed the moisture from the Durham's and warped so that the plaque was unusable. I have had no problems applying water-based materials to a wood surface that has been finished with a sealer like lacquer or polyurethane varnish.

BTW, the sequel to my friend's dilemma is, the plaque was going to support a Revellogram T-Rex from Jurassic Park. My pal panicked when he woke up to find his base ruined, then ran out and found a broken tree branch on which to perch his dino. He took first place in his category at the IPMS show we attended the following day.
 
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