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It appears they are not really new but seem to like the lighter weight of the batteries. What I would like to know is what is the benefit of a mono ball rear end? Are they here to stay?:thumbsup:
 

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Beleive it or not.....McAllister Racing pioneered the mono-ball rear suspension in the late 80s with Dave Pulfer doing the R&D. We called it a "Tilt Bar" suspension. We stopped making car kits in the late 90s, but I still use the same car from that era. Never could figure out why nobody else picked up on it. It's the best way to isolate the rear suspension control with the shocks and springs....plus rear steer adjustment. I wouldn't part with mine, and it seems other manufacturers are seeing the light....finally. I guess it's considered new technology now. History does repeat itself.

Gary McAllister
 

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Beleive it or not.....McAllister Racing pioneered the mono-ball rear suspension in the late 80s with Dave Pulfer doing the R&D. We called it a "Tilt Bar" suspension. We stopped making car kits in the late 90s, but I still use the same car from that era. Never could figure out why nobody else picked up on it. It's the best way to isolate the rear suspension control with the shocks and springs....plus rear steer adjustment. I wouldn't part with mine, and it seems other manufacturers are seeing the light....finally. I guess it's considered new technology now. History does repeat itself.

Gary McAllister

GARY,

I loved that car...and the first time I saw Tony Neisinger wheel that thing at the old RACER'S HAVEN - I was HOOKED.

For years that was my "GO TO" car on flat asphalt. It's also the 1st Car my son ever drove, because it was so easy to dial in, and it just worked.

The SUPERIOR SPECTRE car was a copy for a while, and I was able to use parts from them for a while... I still have a couple of the old Mono Ball "T" Plates (The rest of the cars stuff went to my buddy "ODIE".)
 

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This comes from a good friend of mine in regard to mono-ball.with the lighter weight of the car,the rear pod winds up so much easier than a t-plate car there-fore better rear traction,and reducing wheelspin.
 

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Beleive it or not.....McAllister Racing pioneered the mono-ball rear suspension in the late 80s with Dave Pulfer doing the R&D. We called it a "Tilt Bar" suspension. We stopped making car kits in the late 90s, but I still use the same car from that era. Never could figure out why nobody else picked up on it. It's the best way to isolate the rear suspension control with the shocks and springs....plus rear steer adjustment. I wouldn't part with mine, and it seems other manufacturers are seeing the light....finally. I guess it's considered new technology now. History does repeat itself.

Gary McAllister
Funny. Mikey (Pulfer) and I have been talking about this for a while.

Dynamic rear-steer will be making a comeback and it will likely be based on this design. It may be a little harder for the average guy to tune, but it's not overly difficult.

Now we just need to bring back the wing tubes and rubber bands for holding the rear of the body down. :freak:
 

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Cool, but how can it provide rear steer in the corners and not in the straights?

AT
Since the front of the link is fixed to the chassis and the rear is attached to the pod, when the pod moves the link is essentially changing lengths since it is traveling in an arc. (rear part of the link is changing heights, front is staying in a fixed location) Shim the front of the link up and it makes more reactive rear steer, vice versa.
 

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Since the front of the link is fixed to the chassis and the rear is attached to the pod, when the pod moves the link is essentially changing lengths since it is traveling in an arc. (rear part of the link is changing heights, front is staying in a fixed location) Shim the front of the link up and it makes more reactive rear steer, vice versa.
Another way to visualize the rear steer, in an exagerated fashion, is to look at a dirt late model or an IMCA mod when they roll up on the right rear through the corner and the left rear moves forward. The length of the radius rods and the angle of the rods control the movement. The shorter the rod or more angle the more lateral movement. It is kinda the same.
 

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Just like when you put a shim under the front of the t-plate...Correct?
Not quite the same. If the raise the front of the links, when the car rolls, the outside link gets longer and the inside link gets shorter. this will lengthen the outside of the car and shorten the inside. If you raise the rear of the links the reverse happens. So you can make the rear axle steer right or left when the car rolls.

I did this on my battle axe recently and it worked well, but when the track was slick and the car rolled different amounts the difference in roll/rear steer was noticable. Mostly in a negative way, get out of the groove and the car wouldnt turn, also wouldnt roll, so less rear steer and less turn.

John
 
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