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Discussion Starter #1
the hobby starts driving you wonko?

you paint and you find a whole lot of flaws and you try sanding smooth the areas and repaint but you can see where you've sanded s you sand smooth or strip the entire model and repaint only to find more flaws.

You clamp down a part but the clamp messes up another part that you've spent days on making just so.

You find errors or flaws in a paint job but find that this particular paint doesn't like being spot sanded so you have to strip and in doing so, attacks the underlying putty forcing you to reputty but it was flawless when you did it the first time.

All of these have been within a two day stretch

Just all these thing want me to hang it all up for a month or two or even heave what I have and say to hell with it and quit altogether. I've seem some of the stuff you guys do and I can't come close to the amazing models you produce. Sure, I might be good with a few aspects of it like weathering and basic assembly but when it comes to the overall finish and spot fixes, forget it.
 

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Keep trying. It took me years to figure all this out and I'm still learning!

Some kits I own are "Cursed" in that no matter how many times I try and paint them, or build them, something ALWAYS screws up on that particular kit.

One example ia a Monogram 1956 Chevy. I've painted it Gloss Black and Yellow and I must have painted the black 10 times because it would ALWAYS have fish eyes in the paint, followed by orange peel, or runs, or one coat would attack the other. And each time I'd strip the paint and then try again and same thing....like it was cursed!

Anyway, maybe just leave that kit in the box for a little while and start another project. You can always come back to it.

If you have just returned to the hobby, start in smaller stages and use these kits as "Practice Only" to see how different products, like paint, sandpaper and filler, react to the plastic, etc.

You need the right attitude when model building. Remeber that it's something to do that you enjoy and do for your own satisfaction. Don't try and build kits just to show us guys a lesson, or whatever. Keep in mind that some of us have never taken a break from the hobby and that some of us on here have been in magazines or won various awards in model contests. Others build for customers while others have set a new standard in painting and finishing. It's like jumping in a car for the first time and getting angry and saying "Why can't I drive like in the Indy 500?". You'll get there someday, but for now you just have to keep with the lessons.

Also, keep in mind that we're all here to help. It might just be a matter of asking the right question and someone will have an answer.

I know it gets frustrating and we all have our "Kit From Hell" stories to share, but please continue to try and build things. It's what the hobby is all about!
 

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Also, keep in mind that we're all here to help. It might just be a matter of asking the right question and someone will have an answer.
Over the Years I've run into all of these problems, and the best solution I've found that takes care of a lot of these issues is...FIREWORKS!
Mcdee:wave:
 

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I just take a break...LOL..Sometimes getting away from it a bit will let you come up with some good ideas. On the other hand, I've had a kit that ended up taking 15 years to build...from the time I started it...
 

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I will usually get a similar type of kit to the one I want to do a really good job on, and use that kit to practice on. This was especialy true with 1/48 scale airplane kits. Same goes for figure kits.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
fah! I won't lie down with they try to create mindless drones for the new world order. I won't become a docile sheep for big brother!

Seriously, I need to lay off the coke. (a-cola)

Even on supposed simple kits like the Klingon D-7, I run into trouble like the instance with the clamp driving in a part that should have been cured and steadfast. I was trying to hold the bean in place because it was askew when I applied it initially. It went into place with the clamps - two on the front and one on the back to keep it flush against the "silo" but one of the running lights sot sunken in by the pressure of the clamps but the other clamp was doing the same thing to the other side. I'm hoping it pops back up because other than that, I was doing a pretty good job. I hope reflex action does it's thing otherwise I'm gonna have to replace the whole boom/bridge assembly
 

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If a build of mine isn't working out, I usually put it down and work on something else until I can figure out why it isn't working. After all, it's just parts, right?

What it usually comes down to is whether I'm overworking area. A friend of mine observed that I was waaaay too obsessive over getting a perfect surface before paint stage and we had a nice but very informative chat over that. While I may still tend to worry over that, it is something that I keep in mind now.

Other problems - and subjects my friend and I chatted about - technique is another. Fortunately, that really isn't one of my problems but bringing a kit to completion is! That's a whole other problem for me, and one I'm still working on. :)

Mage, I noted that you seem to be applying a lot of brute force to at least one of your models to assemble it. Don't me wrong; clamps are an important tool in holding things together; I've done that many times. Is it possible you're overdoing that aspect? Most kits - unless they are poorly designed and ill-fitting - shouldn't require a lot of force to hold them together. Just enough force in the right direction is usually the key...! I don't know your model build history (so to speak) so I have no idea how many successful models you've brought to completion. Did they all require a lot of extra work?

A suggestion- could your technique require a bit of refining? I like to work with different genres, not just with my fave subject S/F for variety so one genre doesn't "go stale" on me. I work on aircraft, figure, ships and auto subjects (more or less in that order based on popularity of my purchases). Maybe try something different and don't strive to make a perfect model. A little bit of variety does wonders for improving technique, since all of the above requires different doses of what you're used to in just one genre!

I've tended to go overboard - at least in my expectations - with certain models and it's created a backlog of unfinished kits and my skill sets are unevenly developed as a result. I have to spend more time finishing - painting and decaling - to work out those rough spots. Having a modeling buddy now and again with whom you can share ideas and get support really helps. I know not everyone can have that, but in my case, it is nice to get some different perspective now and again!

Good luck! Don't give up!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
brute force - wo which model are you referring? The klingon ship? I used the clamps on the bean in order to have it sit straight on the bridge platform level while another clamp was holding it against the bridge "silo". That way, it would be level and I could eliminate the need to putty the gap between the bean and the silo later. It wasn't a strong clamp either. I have three strength clamps. The green which are very strong, the yellow which are middle of the road and the red which are pretty weak.

If that's what you mean, that is.

I wish that cars and the like interested me but they just don't. Military stuff kinda does like armor and submarines.
 

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I just chill out and back off the model if there are too many issues that crop up. 'Course, that's why I've got - quite literally - around 300 unfinished models sitting on the shelf. Most are 1/2500 Trek of which the construction is finished on all and the majority of those have at least the base coat applied. But, they're not finished for a variety of excuses - not reasons. :freak:

When you run in to an issue, tho, just step back from the model for a day or so if it gets you to the point where you're frusted. If it's one where you've run in to multiple problems that have you at the point of anger and it's a cheap enough kit and/or you have an extra on-hand, just throw the parts in your spares box and start on a new one. You can always come back to that one later and/or scrap it for some kitbashing.

Ultimately, tho, just ask questions here or at other forums, as others have mentioned in this thread. The vast majority of folks in The Hobby are more than willing to pass on their knowledge.
 

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Just do what I've done go out and get another if you can aford it and take you time and if need be do it different this time like instead of clamps use your fingers or hands to hold the pieces together and then after the cement has started to bond them together put masking tape and/or rubber bands to hold them until the cement has done its job, best to leave it overnight.
And I just started on an AMT refit again that I've been working on since '92 and this time I intend to build her up correctly.
 

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If kit building is giving you too many headaches, give scratch building a try. Draw up something then build it. If problems arise change the drawing that's why pencils have erasers and computers have delete keys. Seriously, I ran into so many painting screw ups with my big Eagle build I thought I was going to cry at one point or worse John Koenig the thing into the floor. I had to strip decals and paint off three shoulder pods, then redecal them. I put a lot of decals on them. I also had to rework the nose cone. Twice. If you're passionate about a model and have confidence in your abilities then take your time and be patient and fix those problems one by one.
 

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I used to get almost disappointed reading this board and seeing such fabulous work and knowing I could never do anything like it . What I have done since is to read all the threads trying to remember when one of the masters slips and spills a secret , then i try to apply that to what I am building. If my latest model comes out better than my last model then I consider it a success that I have learned something new and figured out how to apply it to what I am doing . Seeing the pics of work done here can be very intimidating if you let it , or a source of inspiration . It just depends on how you look at it.
 
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