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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All-

The above aftermarket decals were applied onto a lightly sanded (1200 grit) gloss coated hull. Decal set was applied, decals were properly soaked and slid into position; a little more decal set applied, any excess blotted, then alowed to dry overnight. A final gloss coat was applied, and another 24 hour dry period.
The USS ENTERPRISE decals are 99% 'perfect,' yet four areas on the NC and 7 decals have tiny curls on them, only seen when you're SIX inches from the model at a certain angle.
-What's the fix?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
..thanks.. The client who owns this ship took high resoltion pics in order to see the irregularities..and wants me to 'fix' them, although the ecals are sealed. He's comparing my work to someone who worked for the 'Unobtainium' company that made Enterprises. ..go figure.
BTW: your homepage link is broken.
 

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It's unlikely you'll get the decals to lie perfectly flat now they've been coated so I'd say gently remove the offending curls and then mask and paint in the missing pieces.
 

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This often works for me.

Use the tip of a new #11 blade to pierce through the overcoat and into the decal, tiny little perforations are needed, flood the area with decal solution and press down with a clean cotton cloth. Repeat if needed.

You might have to apply another top coat to blend things back in afterwards.

HTH.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Guys - is it possible during the drying period the decals may have shrunk, thus causing some curling? I always use the flat head paint brush when applying decal set, and when flattening the deacals to get the excess liquid out. Unfortunatley my client is comparing this model to some guy that worked for Unobtanium, i.e. 'Professional Builder.
 

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Make sure he's comparing "apples to apples", then. I never saw an Unobt. E in person, but maybe their "decals" were painted on with stencils? Obviously, their job would look a lot smoother compared to normal model kit decals.
 

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user1127 said:
Unfortunatley my client is comparing this model to some guy that worked for Unobtanium, i.e. 'Professional Builder.
Did you charge him an "Unobtainium price" for the work? If yes, then there may be some reason to sweat the small stuff. If no, then there are nice ways to tell a client who is expecting more than is reasonable to go suck an egg. I always try to figure out a way to say "yes". Offer him options as to how you can address the problem, but a strip/repaint/redecal should not be among them. Offer a refund and take the piece back before you go that route - you may find another willing buyer who won't be wise to the "repairs" you've made in the mean time.

And NO, the customer is not always right. I recently painted a very expensive project the client spec'd, and I advised them against certain risky treatments they wanted to do. Everything I warned them about came to pass and they had to pay me extra to fix their poor choices. I know that's not what we're talking about in this case, but my point is that sometimes even acting in good faith doesn't mean the finished product will reflect well on you - do the best you can and don't expect to please everyone.

John O.
 

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user1127 said:
Unfortunatley my client is comparing this model to some guy that worked for Unobtanium, i.e. 'Professional Builder.
Tell him you'll make sure that the saucer and nacelles will sag two weeks after his (her?) receipt of the model... just like the Unobtanium model... :lol:

JohnO's right. Sometimes clients want you to do things *their* way and completely disregard your professional opinion. If they do, they do it at their own risk. On one of my wife's projects the school district wanted a "wireless" internet connection and overruled my wife's recommendation for a landline solution. Halfway through buildout all of the connectivity and security issues she warned them about came to fruition and the school had to pay through the nose to lay the landline infrastructure on a half-built school.

It sounds to me like you'd rather let things be. If that's the case, I'd suggest that you document the options to your client, outline your recommendation, why you think doing nothing is the best solution and have him (her?) give his instructions in writing in case they want this "fixed". Just in case things go wrong, you have written documentation that you are not liable.

José
 

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Discussion Starter #14
El Gato said:
On one of my wife's projects the school district wanted a "wireless" internet connection and overruled my wife's recommendation for a landline solution. Halfway through buildout all of the connectivity and security issues she warned them about came to fruition and the school had to pay through the nose to lay the landline infrastructure on a half-built school.

José
..do you two live in the MD/VA/DC region?
 

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user1127 said:
..do you two live in the MD/VA/DC region?
:lol: No, we live in another capital region: Sacramento, California. No, we have not spotted Ahnuld. :jest:

José
 
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