Hobbyist Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,752 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is a model of the Franz Joseph Transport Tug that my Dad and I built in 1987. Back then, the ship was the U.S.S. GALILEI - NCC-3808.

Sadly, one day as a school friend was leaving, the ship fell off our stand, landed on the ground, and broke off the engines. (Circa 1988)

Over the years, the broken tug sat in a dresser until we could fix it. About 3 years ago, I took the model from North Vancouver B.C. to Calgary, Alberta and started to take it appart. However, I couldn't get the saucer appart and I couldn't figure out how to remove the warp engine attachment stubs.

Now, in 2009, I found a way to crack off the top of the saucer and rebuild this once great model.

Here's some in progress pics :



Here's the underneath of the Saucer. We used the lower sensor dome and drilled a hole in it. Recently, I discovered that this is not correct, so with some de-bonder, I popped out the dome and filled the holes with putty. Also, notice the two spots where the warp engines use to be attached.



Here's the standard Tug container. My Dad scaled up the Fj Tech Manual drawings to the 18"er scale and then split turned a piece of wood in his wood lathe. To do this, he took two pieces of wood, glued a thin layer of cardboard between them and spun the container to shape in the lathe. After this, he took the finished container out of the lathe, used a chisel to seporate the pieces and remove the cardboard, hollowed out the container, and then glued the two pieces of wood back together.

Since you can't glue wood to plastic, he also carved out two notches in the wooden container to attach the plastic strips that glue to the plastic tow pad.

Two years ago, I filled in all the dents with putty and sanded the container to shape.



Here's the inside of the bottom of the saucer. Note the white plastic squares to give some support to the saucer top. The blue squares are where the original supports for the warp drive pylons were located. (And where the tops of the pylons still are.)



This is how my Dad did it. The pylon comes up through the bottom of the saucer, locks into the 45% angle pieces and is locked with the end pieces. However, everything was glued together so tightly that I had to find a way to cut the pylons out. I did it by following the edge of the pylon with a #16 hobby blade.



Here's the Copernicus' lower sensor dish. My Dad spun the rod in the drill press, spun the end ball seporatly, drilled 2 holes in the ball and attached the sensor, rod and ball together. When the ship fell off the stand in 1988, the rod also broke. I glued it back, but it needs some work to remove the glue seam. The rod is 7/8" long, as propperly scaled from the FJ drawings.



Here's the plyon supports with the broken pylon pieces removed. Note how much the plastic melted because of the glue. This was Testor's red glue from 1987. I used some strong debonder and a lot of force with that #16 blade to remove these! (So if you think Testor's Red glue falls appart after a few years...think again! :D)



Here's where the pylons attached to underneath the ship. Note how melted this area is from the glue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,752 Posts
Discussion Starter #2


Here's one of the support pieces. I believe the angle is 45%.



Here's a rare sight for this kit! The saucer neck actually touches the saucer at the front upper angle.

Well, that's it for the photos for now. I can't wait to get this re-assembled, fix the stand with a little metal pin so that the tug won't roll off it, and paint that wooden container. It's been 21 years since this ship was on my shelf and I have missed it so much.

Bye for now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,297 Posts
I'm going to follow this thread w/ interest!! I've got a Tug conversion sitting and waiting to be done. I think I didn't get the pylon mounting holes in the correct location, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,752 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Sadly, I can't remeber how my Dad came up with the math on that one. He use to work for the B.C. Tel(ephone company) as a draftsman, so he was use to looking at technical drawings and figuring out all the angles and such.

I discovered that when you put the new engines in the ship, that the "Final Stage Magnatomic Flux Chillers", as FJ calls them, don't line up flat without the engines being over extended and hanging outside of the saucer dimensions....which is wrong according to his top and front views. I can't remeber if this was a problem in 1987, but for 2009, it is. I might have to chop off the ends of the warp engines and rotate these a few degrees unless I can figure out how my Dad did it. Somehow the engines don't seem to go in as deep as they do in photo #4. I wonder if Dad didn't file a little off the pylon on one side and maybe that altered the angle?
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top