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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I went too my local SHOP and they made me a 440x2 car on the spot.The guy told me a 440x2 chassis rtr was $10 and a hopped chassis was $20 ,He charged me 10... with a played wth texaco indy body for free.But he ended up having to use parts off of his real race cars!(Maybe he was talking about tires being the ones he put on the car with the yellow 440x2 on the rear tires are they hop up?)The car is very fast and rarely comes off the track. 1 how do you ID Hop up parts on a 440x2 .2 Is The chassis suppose to have play(SWAY) with your fingers moving it?3 he told me dont bother to try to take the original rear wheels off of my tyco pro 2 because they break or prone to break ?same with the tires and front rims l,hard to find?Any help..... Thanks.
 

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It sounds like you have a narrow chassis 440x2. Those chassis generally run very well right out of the box. Flex in that chassis (greenish grey) is normal. They did make a non flex chassis that is black.

Rich
 

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Here is a step-by-step guide to improving the performance of a Tyco 440 X-2. It also includes a parts list.
That's one of many such guides, with questionable advice in several key areas.
 

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Tyco help...

CH-

To help answer your questions- the 440x2 comes in both narrow and wide or "pan" chassis as people refer to it. NT is right- if it fits the Texaco Indy body it is a narrow x2. There are older "bar traction magnet" chassis's but do not perform nearly as well as a 440x2 with the seperate traction mags.

As for the yellow lettered tires. They came off of the newest run of Mattel/Tyco nascar chassis's. From a performance standpoint- just about any slip-on silicone tire is better than those. The older 440x2 white lettered tires are stock tires with lettering on them.

A couple quick things to consider for any 440x2 chassis for home use or just thrashing. Always lower a tyco chassis closer to the track. Find a nice pair of slip-on silicone tires, and swap the stock shoes to "ski" style shoes. Finally, try to find a cheap o-ring front end set (about $3-$4). Those changes will run you about $10 and your Tyco will pick-up the much needed grip on any track. BTW- the o-ring front is not the stock front with an o-ring on it. I have NO idea who's idea that was. The o-ring will NOT stay in place on the rim and it looks like hot-garbage on the car. Especially a front end on the exposed Indy body.

Of course there are many more changes (albeit some very expensive ones) that will make a tyco fly, but for now, just try the above.

As for your Tycopro. The tires on the front and rear are typically dried out and removing the front tires poses two risks. One- if the tire is really dried out it will simply break apart when you try to remove it. No big deal because it is a petrified rubber donut anyway. Second- you need to be careful not to snap the front hub off while trying to take the front tire off. Some Tycopros have axles in the front, others have front rims that "snap" on similar to the newer LifeLike chassis's. I am talking about the snap on style. Don't break those off.

The rear tires is the same deal, theymay crumble as you remove them, but I have never done any damage to a rear axle of a tycopro trying to take off the tires.

Availability of replacments?- Orginal front tires could get tricky, since TP parts are getting harder to find. Honestly I don't know how many stock replacement tires (original) that I have and I have a bunch squirreled away. I would guess very few. The rear tires can be replaced with just about any tire that fits, and once again a small slip on siliocone tire might be your best choice. Maybe someone of the forum here can pointus, I mean you.. LOL to some replacement front tires.

Hope all of this helps..

-Marc and Marcus
 

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The o-ring style front tires that refused to stay on the JL XTraction cars of the Fast and Furious era make good replacement front tires for TycoPro and TycoPro II chassis.
 

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The o-ring style front tires that refused to stay on the JL XTraction cars of the Fast and Furious era make good replacement front tires for TycoPro and TycoPro II chassis.
Yup, stop looking for TycoPro replacement front tires right there, you wont find better ones than these. XT rear tires make a good replacement for those if you want some slide.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
THANKS to all for all the great info!(They must be talking about tires that came on my jl chevelle stock cars,the ones that kept coming off the rims and got tossed!)Even got great -Don't throw anything away advise ,cause you'll never know when you'll need it!:thumbsup:
 

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AfxToo

AfxToo,

Could you identify what you consider questionable in the Tyco tips. If something is incorrect or not advantageous, I can get the information updated.

Secondly, you mention "one of many such guides." Please provide a link to these; any additional information would be helpful to many of us.
 

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There are so many variations on the hop-up theme, each of them can lead to good results, but it comes down to personal preference for parts selection and setup. For new racers and hobbyists it might be better to provide hop-up advice that is geared towards what can be done using the minimum number of aftermarket parts from a minimum number of vendors, with reuse of existing parts that are already on the car already being a priority. I have a hard time imagining that a first time novice who wants to put a little more performance into their stock Tyco (or any other brand) is going to want to acquire several parts from several different vendors in addition to executing the build.

I'm not questioning the formula provided in the link. The things I find questionable are really discretionary, depend on club rules, or are a matter of personal preference, or require more insight by the reader. For example, reverse zapped magnets are great but will get you DQ'd in some racing groups. Likewise, I see double wound pickup shoe springs being a big advantage, but only if they are allowed. I am also a concerned when there were so many different parts vendors mentioned and I know some of the parts are somewhat hard to come by, like gray Tomy gears and Protech shoes.

My intent was not to pit one set of advice on one site against another set of advice on another site. They are all based on experienced racers with proven results. I'm just questioning the usefulness of all of these recipe based solutions for certain audiences. The people who really understand what's behind the recipes are the ones who will know where the variability in parts selection exist, and the pros and cons of each choice. Less familiar readers may be embarking on a somewhat frustrating and potentially expensive parts hunt.

That's all I meant, no ill will was intended.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Thanks ,,, it's all good knowledge for me that i did'nt have before this post .:thumbsup:How can you hop up a short tyco pro 2? is the factor arm red? how old are tyco pro 2?
 

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hello I am newbie here

There are so many variations on the hop-up theme, each of them can lead to good results, but it comes down to personal preference for parts selection and setup. For new racers and hobbyists it might be better to provide hop-up advice that is geared towards what can be done using the minimum number of aftermarket parts from a minimum number of vendors, with reuse of existing parts that are already on the car already being a priority. I have a hard time imagining that a first time novice who wants to put a little more performance into their stock Tyco (or any other brand) is going to want to acquire several parts from several different vendors in addition to executing the build.

I'm not questioning the formula provided in the link. The things I find questionable are really discretionary, depend on club rules, or are a matter of personal preference, or require more insight by the reader. For example, reverse zapped magnets are great but will get you DQ'd in some racing groups. Likewise, I see double wound pickup shoe springs being a big advantage, but only if they are allowed. I am also a concerned when there were so many different parts vendors mentioned and I know some of the parts are somewhat hard to come by, like gray Tomy gears and Protech shoes.

My intent was not to pit one set of advice on one site against another set of advice on another site. They are all based on experienced racers with proven results. I'm just questioning the usefulness of all of these recipe based solutions for certain audiences. The people who really understand what's behind the recipes are the ones who will know where the variability in parts selection exist, and the pros and cons of each choice. Less familiar readers may be embarking on a somewhat frustrating and potentially expensive parts hunt.

That's all I meant, no ill will was intended.
That's a very interesting topic. But this field is still new to me.
It will be grateful if you give me some
more information about it. Thanks in advance.
 

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The Tyco "Pro" (not TycoPro) guidepin is a guide pin offered by Wizzard High Performance (part # CH04). It is aluminum with a steel, drill blank, pin. It is light and strong!
 
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