Hobbyist Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,164 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Some of the fast fray type t-jet guys are using tungston axles anybody know what kind,Or a source.I have looked online and there are different kinds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Try McMastercarr.com They have a great selection of tungsten drill blanks. They should be non-magnetic. drill blanks are magnetic and "can?" create a slight magnetic pull from the Neg. arm. mag. (good prices...flat shipping... so buy a bunch:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
There are a few places to buy the Axles, There is also a difference in weight with Tungsten and Tungsten carbide. Zoomin sell both kinds and you can buy them from Slot pro and from Dynamic Arms I also think you can buy them from HoTtracks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
Dumb question I can see why you might want to use them on the front end because the front axle might not rotate as much and you tend to add weight there anyway but, dont you want to have as little rotational mass possible? Isnt rotational mass roughly 100x more than stationary mass or something like I have the formula somewhere around here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
602 Posts
I don't know much about the rotational forces of stationary. But if you use these axles on the rear of a Fray T-jet, it PLANTS the rear end.
Much higher cornering speeds, lighter bodies, Less lifting, Bigger smiles.:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,348 Posts
Try McMastercarr.com They have a great selection of tungsten drill blanks. They should be non-magnetic. drill blanks are magnetic and "can?" create a slight magnetic pull from the Neg. arm. mag. (good prices...flat shipping... so buy a bunch:)
That'd really be a good one for mythbusters. In an assembled car, there is very little "magnetic activity" on the dumb sides of the motor mags. :)

I had a mag sitting on a BRP matcher once, stuck an axle to the back...no change on the meter; two axles...no change; three axles...no change. That was all I had laying around so I can't say if 4 woulda made a difference. :freak:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,512 Posts
in an assembled car, there is very little "magnetic activity" on the dumb sides of the motor mags.
It's not the flux collector issue, it's the extra drag that is placed on the rear axle when it is in proximity of the rear motor magnet. This is a very real effect and was one of the factors in the poor braking performance of the original Aurora Super II, especially with the stock sponge rear tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
602 Posts
That'd really be a good one for mythbusters.
OK so here's the test:

Stock T-jet chassis.(Bare)
Stock rear axle.
two hot rod wheels W/ big hard rubber tires. (for rotational mass)
a good bit of oil on the axles

Now spool up the rears with a dremel, let them coast. Note the time.
Insert magnets and repeat test.

I'll bet the difference is minimal, even with Dash mags.



New forum idea:

HO Busters (please don't try this in your mancave) :wave:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
Don't believe a word of it...

I started using silicone carbide drill blanks for axles in T-Jets eight years ago. The reason I switches was to go to a non-magnetic material.

I had a rolling T-Jet chassis all set up with the top technology of the day. The rear axle was a tool steel drill blank. I could give it a small push and it would roll to the other side of the workbench with ease. Sweet! When I dropped in a set of neo magnets, it wouldn't even roll 5 inches with the same push. The difference - axle friction caused by magnetic attraction of the rear axle.

The number one performance gain from using carbide axles is the horsepower gain from totally eliminating the axle-magnet friction. The CoG gain comes along as a free bonus.

Just my humble opinion... :dude:
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top