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Discussion Starter #1
Well, after a week's work and 80 pieces, I finished it.

No, not the airplane model.

The frickin' engine! I picked up the 1/32 scale Trumpeter F4U-4 last week. Honestly, I think the model is over-detailed. Photoetched hinges for the control surfaces? I appreciate optional position control surfaces but it ain't like I'm a ten year boy whose going to be playing with it. Do we really need moving parts? But I did just finish the engine.

Oh, it looks nice so I'm posting two pictures. But some of this stuff can never be seen (even with the cowling removed). The accessory section at the rear of the engine is behind the firewall, inside the fuselage. Anyway, here are two pictures * (hit "next" to see second photo)

http://groups.msn.com/Margaret6547/miscellaneous.msnw?action=ShowPhoto&PhotoID=27

*Photo hosting courtesy of my mother's website since my own site won't accept my password! Geez...
 

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Oxidation Genius
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Whew!

Trumpeter's 1/32 F-105 is the same way - it has a nicely detailed engine that gets completely sealed inside. The rear fuselage can be removeable, but not if you attach the vertical fin the way it's supposed to be attached. I'll find a way.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
John, I'd be curious to know just how accurate that F-105 engine is.

I have the Trumpeter MiG-21 (an older kit) which also has a similar arrangement. It has a detailed engine which can be viewed only if the rear fuselage is removed...in a highly suspicious manner which just doesn't look right. Furthermore, there is ZERO interior detail. You end up with an engine inside a fuselage which has NO interior bulkheads, frames stringers, longerons...NOTHIN'.

Most unusual is that, near as I can tell, the very detailed engine doesn't actually look like the MiG's engine. I compared it to a photo of the real thing (a Tumansky IIRC) and it isn't really close. That seems to be an old Trumpeter trick: make something very involved and detailed, even if it isn't accurate!

With this R-2800, they seem to have hit the nail on the head and all credit to them. I just wonder if they've got their act together with the jet engines yet.
 

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True Sprue
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Anybody remember who did the wasp engine on a stand a few years back, I think it was 1/6 scale? (MRC maybe)
 

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.......OH the places you will go and the pills they will give you! :freak:
Looks very cool though! :thumbsup:
 

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Slotcar Fanatic
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Looks great Brent. I would just throw a little wash on there to give it that "used" look and she's ready to install. Can't wait for the pix of the completed plane. Thanks, rr :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Despite all the work, I STILL managed to botch something. All of the components are keyed (a raised key fits into a slot on the matching piece) to ensure everything lines up correctly.

Somehow (and I can't imagine how I did it), I managed to get the section that mounts to the airplane installed incorrectly. If left as is, it would result in an installation that was rotated about 30 degrees with the magnetos pointing in the wrong direction.

Fortunately, it wasn't a big deal and I've corrrected it. But it meant shaving off the original key and making a new, repositioned, key from scrap. Just another one of those niggling little delays that turn these tings into year long projects :).
 

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The sign says:

DO NOT GIVE THE RODENTS PILLS!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I'm not really sure how the film is made but it looks very much like normal celluloid or acetate film stock with a photographic representation of the guages. It's printed on a small piece about the size of 35mm film frame. It's trimmed to size before applying.

The "faceplate" of the instrument panel is a standard molded piece with holes where the dial faces will be visible.

Now, I have never used this before and the kit didn't include any instructions so I played it safe and used water based materials. I attached the film to the back of the faceplate with Micro Krystal Klear which is basically just white Elmer's glue. I painted the back of the film with white acrylic (The detail on the film is clear so, if you don't paint it white, it will show the color of whatever it is glued to). When dry, I again used Micro Krystal Klear to glue the assembly to the larger instrument panel bulkhead molding.

It's entirely possible that solvent based adhesives and paints are acceptable. But, not knowing for sure, I didn't want to risk having the film shrivel up or melt!

Oh...about that uncomfy looking seat. Pilots sat on their parachutes so the seat proper was nothing more than an uninviting tin bucket.
 

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Yes,

That seat was uncomfortable, that's why they sat on the parachute! The seat was designed that way to be easly cleaned after a really good dog fight! ;)
 
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