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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just picked up a very old Trim All edger. It looks to be in reasonable shape except the blade shaft has been neglected and worn. It looks repairable with new brass bushings and a shaft.

Before I decided to spend $25 on my $15 edger it had to run. I fired it up and it ran pretty smoothly. There was no air filter element and the housing was dirty. I cleaned it up just enough for this trial run but I will look for an element.

The trimmer runs great at about 1/2 throttle and I left it to run there for about 15 minutes, but when I tried to advance the butterfly to full throttle it initially sped up but then almost stalled.

Questions.
Are these units typically run at 1/2 throttle (on the carb?). The lever was full throttle but there is a spring and maybe some adjustment needed.
Would this choking near full throttle be a sign of a dirty carb? Any advice on cleaning procedure?

Thanks
 

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The term "choking", or "choking out" refers to too much fuel being delivered. It sounds like your engine is starving for fuel, or bogging out.
It is very possible dirt from the intake entered the carb. through an internal vent, so you're probably on the right track.
Alternatively, the intake valve could be very worn from the dirt, look for excessive spit-back from the carb. at higher RPM.

Given the brand of edger, it most likely has a B&S engine. If it's old enough, it'll have a high-speed mixture screw (with a spring on it's shank) on the side of the carburetor about 3/8" up from the tank surface. If it has this, turn it out (CC) 1/8 turn at a time to see if it runs better. This would be enrichening the HS mixture.
On the other hand, if it has a screw with a spring, but is located almost flush with the tank, that's an idle mixture screw and won't help high-speed starvation.
Post engine numbers for more help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello paulR44.

I have some pictures of the motor. None show the engine code, but you are right, B&S 2HP 3600RPM "easy spin" . There is a sticker on top of the motor that says MODEL KS-122 A Another sticker on the side has Model and Type Code, but I don't see any information.

I will add a few pictures of the carb this morning.

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The term "choking", or "choking out" refers to too much fuel being delivered. It sounds like your engine is starving for fuel, or bogging out.
I agree. Thanks for clarifying.
Alternatively, the intake valve could be very worn from the dirt, look for excessive spit-back from the carb. at higher RPM.
How would I determine this? Not sure why anyone would run a tool like this that works in a dirty environment without a filter element.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I see the model info is stamped into the engine cover. Missed that completely
Model = 60102 0262
Type = 01
Code = 76022501
 

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The code tells you the year of mfg: 1976. A rough year for me in H.S. Also the bi-centennial.
It's easy-spin as it a) has a compression release, and b) has a heavy flywheel (no blade etc. to add rotating mass).

The screw in the center of your pic is the high-speed mixture adj. You could try backing that screw out in 1/8 turn increments. If it runs, read up on balancing a carb.
Base setting is to turn it in till it bottoms (lightly), then back out 1-1/2 turns. The brass main jet is behind the screw assy.

If you need to rebuild the carb: all the parts you need to rebuild the carb., including a pick-up pipe (if it has a plastic pipe), are available. The brass pick-up pipe replacement is NLA (but surely there's some out there if you really need one). IF THE SCREEN is clean, and you can blow through the pipe easily, DON'T try to replace it, can be a headache to do. If you do rebuild it, might I suggest you flat-file and then flat-sand the intake flange (of the carb.). That type B&S mount often led to flange warpage. At least check it. Also get new mounting screws. AND get a B&S 19305 offset screwdriver.

As for checking the valves, there are several methods.
Take a compression reading, should be 60-80psi.
Do a leak-down test, max. loss 10%.
Physical inspection.

What I practice is to try and run an engine (with a suspect/known fuel-delivery issue) on spray prime, such as carb. or brake cleaner. This way, you're testing the spark under load and the valve train - at least base functions anyway. A warmed-up engine, or one under heavy load can have other ailments only then reveal themselves.
If it runs on spray, then you may get it running well by addressing the fuel system.

To be honest, given the age I'd probably just pull the head. You'd get a good idea of the cylinder condition (I.E. wear), a chance to inspect the valves, and de-carbon it. Also, old engines like this often have some head-gasket leakage. The head gasket is like $6.

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I wasn't in high school but old enough to be interested in collecting the quarters.

I am going to go ahead with the purchase of the bushing and shaft. I think even as it is, it might get the job done and I am kind of attached to it already. Looks like it is simple and well made.

The inside of the tank is pretty clean looking and the pickup is plastic.

I will give it a compression test and look more into the leakdown test. good to know for other diagnostics that I don't do much of.

I have several screwdrivers that might fit the bill for removing the carburetor. While searching I found a catalog of B&S tools. Pretty cool https://mservice.by/downloads/catalog/service/ToolList_Briggs.pdf

For the leakdown test, I watched a leakdown test on youtube... it looked like 80PSI was a good charge on a cold engine with no oil added to the combustion chamber. Does that sound right?

I will also look into the head. Probably for now, I will try to repair the shaft, clean the carb, put in an air filter element and give it a test run. Maybe give it a good cleaning, a patriotic paint job nd a head gasket, if needed, in the off season.
 

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Leak-down testers are typically used when looking for oil consumption issues (such as breather issues or blow-by), or for diag. on multiple cylinder engines.
60 lbs. compression would be a min. for an engine like that.

For as easy as it is to pull the head on a flathead like this, I'd forego a leak-down test and just do a physical (also good testers aren't cheap - but you can make your own if you have the stuff). With physical inspection, you can see if there's any cross-hatch left, and if none, how heavy is the ridge? Or, is there scoring? If you ever peek inside a plug boss or pull a head and see a lot of oil on the piston crown, that's a problem. Spark plugs will usually tell a story by that point.

If you have a thin-wall 3/8 box wrench, you can probably get away with that instead of the B&S screwdriver. It's real easy to get at the R/H bolt with the blower housing off. Wouldn't hurt to lube the starter clutch if you take the blower housing off.
 

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Leak-down testers are typically used when looking for oil consumption issues (such as breather issues or blow-by), or for diag. on multiple cylinder engines.
60 lbs. compression would be a min. for an engine like that.
...

Ditto all already said above. Pull head inspect.
Will add one more. Check the valve guide play. The old briggs will run forever if oil kept in it but the only other trouble I have seen is exhaust valve guide wear. Once got a go cart no one could keep running. Carb don already and all. It would sometimes want to start- sometimes hit 5,6 or 7 cycles the just die. Very hard to start cold. Sometimes run for a while at higher rpm with some pops out exhaust and die at idle. Found the exhaust guide so worn- sometimes valve would seal if it “fell” in the seat straight sometimes valve would cock and no seal. All info I got was - it was junk-can’t service the valve guide. But at that time when I did search-the exhaust guide was available! Eleven bucks plus 8 for gaskets. I took a tap-tapped threads in the valve guide-used a grade 8 bolt( or maybe it was a ford forged bolt with integral washer head)- and with washers and a brake caliper sleeve- I pulled that guide out. Started to move with a tremendous SNAP sound. Smacked the new one with a hammer. Lapped in the valve- that thing ran like a brand new beast! (Tools don’t make the mechanic, mechanic makes the tools) good luck.
 

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Ditto all already said above. Pull head inspect.
Will add one more. Check the valve guide play. The old briggs will run forever if oil kept in it but the only other trouble I have seen is exhaust valve guide wear. Once got a go cart no one could keep running. Carb don already and all. It would sometimes want to start- sometimes hit 5,6 or 7 cycles the just die. Very hard to start cold. Sometimes run for a while at higher rpm with some pops out exhaust and die at idle. Found the exhaust guide so worn- sometimes valve would seal if it “fell” in the seat straight sometimes valve would cock and no seal. All info I got was - it was junk-can’t service the valve guide. But at that time when I did search-the exhaust guide was available! Eleven bucks plus 8 for gaskets. I took a tap-tapped threads in the valve guide-used a grade 8 bolt( or maybe it was a ford forged bolt with integral washer head)- and with washers and a brake caliper sleeve- I pulled that guide out. Started to move with a tremendous SNAP sound. Smacked the new one with a hammer. Lapped in the valve- that thing ran like a brand new beast! (Tools don’t make the mechanic, mechanic makes the tools) good luck.
 
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