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Discussion Starter #1
I am working on putting the body of a kit onto the chassis. One side will not fit tightly, but I cannot see through cross-members, transfer cases etc. to spot where exactly it is touching. Have any of you tried using some paint, or something on the pieces to mark a high spot?
Any other suggestions?

Thanks!
 

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mgh,

I'm not clear on your question and need a bit more information:
  • Is this is a car body that you're assembling to a chassis?
  • And if one side (driver? passenger? front? rear?) isn't fitting tightly the other side is, perhaps too tightly?
  • Are the fit problems at the chassis or at the bucket?
Without knowing more, I would advise you to turn down the lighting on your work area and use a small flashlight to try to pinpoint the problem area.

Good luck! :thumbsup:
 

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It sounds like a car kit... Usually I test fit things REPEATEDLY. If you wait until you get the whole chassis built, the interior in position, and then find out the body doesn't fit right or hit something you are pretty much SOL. Its better to test fit as you go all along so that when you glue part X in place and suddenly the body doesn't fit, you know thats the problem
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The fit is with the floor pan not fitting snugly against the chassis. I can't tell what it is hanging up on. I think it is the hump in the floorboard running into either the transmission or the transfer case, but I cannot see where or what for certain is doing it.

I will try going in with a flashlight.

I do attempt to dry-fit, but for my skill level, I get to the point where I don't know how to hold so many loose parts together all at once, and have to start gluing :eek:

Thanks for the suggestions.
 

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Try lightly rubbing the parts you think are hanging up witha grease pencil or crayon then put the 2 parts together. You should see a smear of color where the parts rub.
 

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Try sandwiching thin carbon paper between the parts like dentists do to see where new filings and crowns hit the opposite tooth. This carbon ink should leave dark a deposit on the part location in question if the fit is correct. If it doesn't look around that area for the offending high or warped spot

Regards,
Matt
 

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Here's an easy way to tell: If you have some chewing gum, modeling clay, silly putty, or play-doh you can put a tiny amount along the frame rails to see what squeezes out between them the most. This is how I figure out where my high, and low spots are when you can't physically see them.

The crayon, or grease pencil only works when you're sanding something flat, and need to see high, and low spots that are visible to the eye. Since plasti-guage only works on the journals of crankshafts, and camshafts on cars, and trucks since the bolts crush the material, you won't have that kind of tension between parts in a plastic model. I hope this helps!

~ Chris​
 
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