Hobbyist Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,969 Posts
Hmm....a little off on the timeline regarding the Klingon ship (its first appearance wasn't until "The Enterprise Incident" in the third season, although the D-7 did show up in "The Making of Star Trek", which came out shortly after the second season but before a third season was confirmed), but a good read, nonetheless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,777 Posts
And there seems to be errors of contextual understanding in parts. I had never heard, ANYWHERE, that Poe (nee Whitfield) and Jeffries were trying to get AMT to back a TV series, I'm pretty darn sure that any mentions of 'series' was in regards to a line of kits.

Yes, there was a short-short to give the ship and the universe it plied the bones of a background, to make it seem more real. Doesn't mean that's meant to be a pitch for a TV show.

I'm pretty sure if there WAS a series to be pitched, we'd have heard about it by now, right? Poe knew Trekfans, I'm sure a book talking about a TV show that didn't happen would have been well received. Heck, I'd love to see what else Jeffries had on the boards for the kit line!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,188 Posts
I recall reading that Jeffries recycled the Lief Ericson design (slightly modified) for a proposed War of the Worlds TV series...or did the possible series come before the model?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,777 Posts
I recall reading that Jeffries recycled the Lief Ericson design (slightly modified) for a proposed War of the Worlds TV series...or did the possible series come before the model?
After.

I think, and it doesn't seem to get mentioned, this War of the Worlds series was supposed to be another part of Paramount's attempt to launch a 4th Network in the mid '70s.

Memory says Dykstra was involved and the plan was to use model sets and key in the actors (what we call 'green stage' nowadays) in some 'new groundbreaking special effects' way. I seem to recall a decent sized article in an early Starlog about all that. Of course the lynchpin of that stillborn network was Star Trek Phase II.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
718 Posts
Memory says Dykstra was involved and the plan was to use model sets and key in the actors (what we call 'green stage' nowadays) in some 'new groundbreaking special effects' way. I seem to recall a decent sized article in an early Starlog about all that. Of course the lynchpin of that stillborn network was Star Trek Phase II.
Yep. All correct.

They called the effect "Magicam." They actually created an SFX house specifically to do the SFX for that... and even after the effects process proved to be only useful for occasional shots, rather than being able to create the majority of the "set work," they retained the name. You'll find that Magicam, as a company, continued to exist for some time... and I'm not 100% sure that it's not still out there, though I haven't seen the name in ages.

The funny thing is, despite claims that this was going to be "groundbreaking," it really wasn't new at all. In fact, Saturday morning TV had been doing the same thing... for "Land of the Lost," among others... long before the creation of "Magicam."

Interestingly, we see this done all the time, now. Sometimes effectively, sometimes not. None of the Star Wars prequels could have been done without this basic concept, after all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,768 Posts
What was unique with Magicam is that it utilized electronically synchronized live cameras, with the "miniature" camera performing exacting moves in scale to the "full size" camera (e.g. if the "full size" camera moved ten feet laterally, the "miniature" camera, shooting a 1/10 scale set, would move one foot in the same direction at the same time.

This would allow for actors to be placed in an all-blue environment, and electronically composited "live" with an Ultimatte electronic matting system, into the miniature environment, thereby saving thousands of dollars in full-size set costs, and delivering a shot that was finished and could be cut into the production without expensive post production processes.

Probably the best demonstration of the Magicam process was the PBS series Cosmos, in a scene where Carl Sagan is placed into a recreation of the historical Alexandrian Library, that was represented by an exquisitely-detailed tabletop miniature.

Nowadays, the process is similar with marrying actors into a cgi environment via blue or green screen together with motion tracking and match-moving in post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,768 Posts
Yes, it was utilized primarily in the pilot episode, matting a flailing, out-of-control Ralph into a miniature alleyway. The majority of the rest of the flying effects were done via bluescreen and Ultimatte, but not necessarily the Magicam process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,150 Posts
Magicam was credited with constructing the Drydock and the U.S.S. Enterprise models for STTMP.

BTW, two words: The Starlost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
520 Posts
Magicam had two different components to it - the stage/live action compositing aspect, as well as the model shop.

The model shop did indeed construct a number of miniatures for ST:TMP, as well as the miniatures for Greatest American Hero and Cosmos.

And they were involved with those shows on the live action side, as well as an episode of Mork and Mindy.

Future General (Doug Trumbull's co. that was set up as a "think tank" for different types of exhibition films and FX) was around, and owned by Paramount at the same time.

If what I was told years ago is correct - the old Magicam stages (not the model shop) were on the old Paramount lot, where the Arsenio Hall show was taped when I was on the lot. Those stages coincide with the original stages for ST:TOS back in the Desilu days........ So it all comes back around.....

Gene
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,150 Posts
What I find amusing about The Greatest American Hero is that, for the final season, they brought in Zoran Perisic and his Zoptic system used in the Superman films.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top