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Discussion Starter #1
I have seen several suggestions for fastening the track down. Screws, need to be counter sunk by hand and then you have the slotted heads to touch up. Flat head nails then heat the nail with a soldering iron to let them settle flush with the track. Then there is the question of how many nails/screws to use? Do I need to put two fasteners in each section of track? If I start on the front straight and fasten the first 15" section with two fasteners then go with one fastener at the end of the next section would the track stay pretty flat? Or do I need to do two fasteners per section? Have laid out the track and am waiting on some additional track to finish the inside two lanes, so I have time to think about this a while. Thanks for the help! Ralf :cool:
 

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Simple solution.... Liquid nails .... You know the stuff that comes in a tube and you use a calk gun to put it on with. Just don't use it at the connecting joints because it may ooze thru the cracks.


GOOSE CHICKEN �
 

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I have built my table and it is covered with green carpeting to help quiet the track noise. Don't know how the liquid nails would work on the carpeting? :confused: Thanks Ralf :cool:
 

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Finally got all of my track and the power taps are all wired and soldered, I am ready to start laying track! Still haven't gotten much feed back on my question. I have looked at the www.hoslotcarracing.com site (GREAT site!) and he discusses two methods. One requiring countersinking (by hand) and the other with small flat head nails (have to heat the nails with a soldering iron tip to counter sink the heads). I am laying the track over carpet for sound deadening so glue is out. What have all you guys done? thanks Ralf :cool:
 

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Since you've used carpeting I'd say that countersunk screws that are long enough to go through the carpet and bite into the table are your best bet. Screws can be removed should you need to. Predrill holes slightly smaller than the screw size through the carpet and into the table for each screw. Pull out any loose carpet fibers that are in the screw hole. Don't deform the track by overtightening. If you are using Tomy track and end up with a bump at a joint, uncouple the two sections and grind off the little raised nibs on the bottom locking tabs. If you have any concerns about using magnetic screws you can use brass ones, but buy them from someone like McMaster-Carr in bulk to get them cheaper.

By the way, if you had glued down your track I'd recommend using RTV silicone caulk rather than Liquid Nails (construction adhesive). With silicone you can peel the track up later if you really needed to. Construction adhesive is much more permanent.

Post some pictures when you're done with the raceway!
 

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Ordered screws through McMaster-Carr today, decided to go that route. Will post pics when the track is done! Thanks Ralf :cool:
 

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I cannot believe the service from McMaster-Carr! Had never ordered from them before. Ordered the screws yesterday afternoon and they are here already! Under 24 hrs! Looks like snow here in western NC tomorrow and now can work on my track! If you guys need something in a hurry give em a try! Ralf :cool:
 

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Ralf,
Where are you at in western NC??? We have an HO club of racers and collectors here in NC. If you(or anyone else) would like additional information you can contact me at [email protected]

Bob Weichbrodt, "Rawafx"
A and H Hobbies
W-S, NC

I guess I could have looked at your info and seen Candler!!!
 

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i have a question about wireing anyone ever tryed to use the window alarm tape instead of running wire under your layout they use it for braid so i was wondering why u couldnt run it and solder wire to the tape and go to the taps on the track? just a thought looks like it would be very neet and tidey if it would work
 

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fastening track

We use old Aurora lock and joiner track, so we pre-drill a screw hole in the table and then screw it down (softly) with a #4 (I think) flat top, tapered screw. Each track section is connected underneath with 2 track repair clips. I have no gaps, no clickety clack noises. Smooth, quiet, quick racing. Works nicely. I have a 62' four lane track with 7 pairs of power taps. It can be tough to get track that isnt warped due to age and previous use or poor storage.


We used to use Tomy track, but Tjet track works better for Tjet racing. Magnet cars like the Tomy track better.

Tomy track is harder to put down firmly without messing it up. Drilling and screwing or nailing and heating the nail heads is difficult to get correct.

Dont put the track on carpet, it will pull up when you dont want it to. You will get huge amounts of fuzz in your axles and gears. We learned this the hard way.

Looks like a really old thread....
 

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Simple solution.... Liquid nails .... You know the stuff that comes in a tube and you use a calk gun to put it on with. Just don't use it at the connecting joints because it may ooze thru the cracks.


GOOSE CHICKEN �
Good God NO! That stuff will never come up.

I've used clear silicone caulk to fasten down track and you can always pull it up with minimal fuss if you need to make adjustments sometime down the road.

My $.02 worth.
 

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Simple solution.... Liquid nails .... You know the stuff that comes in a tube and you use a calk gun to put it on with. Just don't use it at the connecting joints because it may ooze thru the cracks.


GOOSE CHICKEN �

Well look who's back in town. Good to see you're posting! :thumbsup::thumbsup: Dave
 

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Just to throw in my two wheat pennies...

I used pretty much the method Greg Braun talks about on his site. I bought a counter-sinking bit and installed it into my drill rather than using a hand-held gadget. I actually achieved better results if the holes were ever so slightly oversized. After all, you simply want to hold the track in place rather than secure it against a hurricane or tornado. As a guy told me a long time ago, tighten the screw...don't weld it.

One of the biggest tricks is making sure you drive the screw through the track and into the tabletop STRAIGHT. Tomy track definitely requires some massaging as you're securing the track and after it's secured. I'm still not done tuning all the joints and rails.
 

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Just realize that if you screw or nail your track down, you lose all the sound deadening benefits of the carpet. When you drive the screw or nail through the carpet into your wood base, the sound travels through the screw/nail and it will sound as if your track is sitting directly on the plywood.

I think the only way to get around this is to use something like homasote as your base rather than plywood.

Joe
 

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I'm starting to wonder if I really want to screw mine down?? Adding noise and "goofyness" to the joints dosen't sound like much fun, but it is "lumpy" they way it is. Some of the Tomy peices are bent in a couple of different directions. The 15" "striaghts" are the most annoying.
 

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Some of the Tomy peices are bent in a couple of different directions. The 15" "striaghts" are the most annoying.
That is annoying , isn't it? Equally annoying is the hump in the middle that many 15" pieces have.

I'm getting pretty close to the day where I lay track in a permanent configuration also. I have a two fold plan......

1) spend time examning and pairing up straights with one another. The so-called "straight" pieces that aren't quite so, will be reserved for the far reaches of the table, where this abnormality will be less noticeable. The long front straight that can be more easily seen will incorporate the straighter pieces.

2) Use the silicone caulk method of attachment for the majority of pieces. I'm hoping that this will eliminate the hump. However, I will be using screws for the power tracks. I want to make sure that anything with wiring is more sound and secure.

Keeping my fingers crossed that this is a decent plan. As always, I remain open to other ideas that will help (nudge nudge, wink wink, tell me more)
 

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I don't know if this helps, but I have placed the small wire brad nails at the edges of the track in some places instead of through the holes in the center of the track. The nail head sits on the track edge in between the 1/4" plywood inlay next to the track. It holds the track down but also allows it to move a little with contraction and expansion. That issue is what causes most tracks to get all twisty when nailing down every piece at the joints or in the center holes. I'm not concerned with track noise all that much so this idea is merely for securing track yet allowing it to 'float' a little on the table.



Scott
 
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