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Recently entered the hobby of customizing Hot Wheels. I strip the original paint, prime and repaint. After producing several cars, the question I have is, is it necessary to prime the bare metal or just skip that step shoot my paint? I typically use Krylon. I could see maybe laying down a base coat of white paint then shooting the true color? Any opinions or advice would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

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I recently stripped and repainted a Saleen S7. I used Krylon satin black without primer. I think on the next one though, just for durability, I will use a primer.

Recently entered the hobby of customizing Hot Wheels. I strip the original paint, prime and repaint. After producing several cars, the question I have is, is it necessary to prime the bare metal or just skip that step shoot my paint? I typically use Krylon. I could see maybe laying down a base coat of white paint then shooting the true color? Any opinions or advice would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

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I know that there are some customizers out there that swear by painting over the existing paint.

Think about it. When you strip a casting, look at all the imperfections that were hidden by the paint that Hot Wheels used. If you use it as a base, your top coat should turn out great.
 

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Having never painted a car before it's something I've been curious about as well. I always figured painting over existing paint might leave a thick looking finish, or drown out fine details like louvers or vents.
 

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Having never painted a car before it's something I've been curious about as well. I always figured painting over existing paint might leave a thick looking finish, or drown out fine details like louvers or vents.
If you think about it, what's the difference? The existing paint should really be no thicker than a coat of primer from a rattle can.

If people are going to the extent of using an automotive type primer from an airbrush, then I would think stripping and prepping the casting would be a good idea.
 
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