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Discussion Starter #1
So, since I have a lot of the 1/537 refit Constitution-Class kits, I figured I'd do a quick build of the variant seen in the TNG episode "Booby Trap", which was presumably, a Utopia Planitia study model for a proposed refit class or something, and was painted silver, with the warp nacelles oriented sideways, and the window inserts missing from the saucer rim, hinting at the idea of multiple large hangar bays around the saucer rim.

I've started by priming the saucer section, inside and out. Silver paint will soon follow. Updates to come soon.
CC098CB2-65DE-4C37-81B8-188D43026146.jpeg
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Day two progress: Applied silver paint to the saucer, inside and out, primed the display stand and neck, and applied silver paint to display stand and neck, as well as assembled the saucer and pylons (not shown in photo).
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I like the idea of that ship as a variant/refit cargo vessel but, personally, not sure I would want to replicate the silver of the model in the episode since it seems to be more of a trophy-type plating (like the gold plating, IIRC, of the ships on the wall in "First Contact) vs. an attempt to accurately represent the ship's paint job. But, by all means, if you like it in silver, go for it. (y) Looking forward to your progress shots.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Welp... I was almost completely finished with this thing, when the saucer and secondary hull decided they do not want to glue together, no matter how much I try. I've been using superglue on the model all the way through, and I haven't had a single issue, until I wanted to join the saucer to the secondary hull. I'm gonna try using some Testors tube glue on it tomorrow, and if that doesn't work, then frak it... I'm just gonna strip the paint, carefully disassemble the model, and either kitbash something with it, or redo the original concept, but without the silver - I'll give it a standard film-era paint job. We'll see.
 

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Just curious, are you planning on lighting this? If not , may I ask why you felt it necessary to paint the inside surfaces? Also, is it an issue with the saucer not gluing to the secondary hull or is it a fit issue? You do know that superglue softens paint right? Makes for a lousy glue joint. The only glue I use on painted surfaces is 5 minute epoxy; otherwise I either have to scrape the paint off before gluing or mask off the surfaces that get glue before I paint.
 

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The Testers glue will probably do the same if any paint is still in the glue joint. Try scrapping away or sanding the paint off the joint surfaces to be glued together.

Also to much super glue will take a while to dry. Are you using it sparingly or so much so that it seeps out when the parts are pressed together?

Another way around the painted glue joints is to assembly the model and then paint it.

Hope you have better luck today! 🤙
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Just curious, are you planning on lighting this? If not , may I ask why you felt it necessary to paint the inside surfaces? Also, is it an issue with the saucer not gluing to the secondary hull or is it a fit issue? You do know that superglue softens paint right? Makes for a lousy glue joint. The only glue I use on painted surfaces is 5 minute epoxy; otherwise I either have to scrape the paint off before gluing or mask off the surfaces that get glue before I paint.
No, I'm not planning lighting for this kit. The reason I painted the inside surfaces is because, as you can see from the red circled part of the photo, while the other openings all appeared to be open and black, that front opening looked to have some silver to it... as if one of those window inserts had fallen into the saucer at an angle. But that couldn't be, if all the other insert areas were open. It finally dawned on me that what I could be seeing, was the silver paint inside the saucer being highlighted or reflected by the bright studio lighting.

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Discussion Starter #12
The Testers glue will probably do the same if any paint is still in the glue joint. Try scrapping away or sanding the paint off the joint surfaces to be glued together.

Also to much super glue will take a while to dry. Are you using it sparingly or so much so that it seeps out when the parts are pressed together?

Another way around the painted glue joints is to assembly the model and then paint it.

Hope you have better luck today! 🤙
Thanks. At first I used it sparingly, but when it became obvious it wasn't sticking, I used it more liberally. I'm definitely going to try sanding the area down a bit, and then gluing again. But if that does not work, then as I said, I'm just gonna strip all the paint, carefully disassemble the model, and start a new project with it. I wanted this to be a quick and fun prop recreation, but I'm not gonna spend a month building an all-silver prop that was likely just assembled in a couple hours before the scene was shot.
 

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You may have gone to alot of trouble for nothing though. The circled portion in you photo is probably still a reflection but it is also a black surface reflecting the studio lights - not silver. Notice the far right portion that is shaded by the depth of the fuselauge inset from the lighting angle.
 

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If I had to guess, I'd say most likely the model was just slapped together (omitting the somewhat fiddly window inserts in the process - possibly including the torpedo launcher and impulse engines as well), then painted with a silver rattle can.

I'm sure it was done quickly, just to get some more visual interest into the scene, and I know they often counted on the low resolution of TV at the time to cover for a lot of flaws.

For example: Insufficient Data.png

I've no doubt that what you've already put together is considerably nicer than what appeared on screen.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
^
Thanks. Yeah, I basically just used basic Krylon plain silver to paint this. However, I have noticed that on MY model, when I position the warp nacelles the way they are in the episode, mine are somewhat angled downward, where the ones on the model are perfectly horizontal, so IDK what I'm doing wrong.
 

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IIRC, the story goes that Rod Roddenberry, Gene's son, whipped the model together and either asked his dad to put it in the show, or Gene put it on the set on his own.
 

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^
Thanks. Yeah, I basically just used basic Krylon plain silver to paint this. However, I have noticed that on MY model, when I position the warp nacelles the way they are in the episode, mine are somewhat angled downward, where the ones on the model are perfectly horizontal, so IDK what I'm doing wrong.
If your nacelles are lower at the rear they are probably the same. Look at the scene shot and notice the front of the ship is pointing down with the nacelles appearing level. Is yours angled about the same?
 

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There is a way to get the saucer to sit atop the neck evenly, take 2 strips of plastic about an inch long and a 1/4 inch wide by 1 mm thick and drill a hole in each in the center and then drill 2 holes then when it comes time to glue the neck in place also put a rod through each hole with a good snug fit.
 
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