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For those who want to add putty to get rid of the goofy Aztec detail...….

Remember, in order to add these panels, they had to cut more metal out of the tool. Increasing the thickness anywhere they added these tiles.

If you want to return to the smoothie as close as possible, you need to sand without adding the putty.

I suggest to anyone attempting this, prime with a color that has good contrast from the plastic.
This will show you your progress.
Once you get close, spray with more primer and go to a finer grade of sand paper and repeat until you get it the way you like it.

On a side note...…
To me, the texture of these panels reminds me of stone blocks.
I've often thought of painting a Enterprise, embracing this stone panel look and creating the 'Castle Enterprise'.
Thanks for the reminder. :thumbsup: Very good point to bring up that I hadn't really thought about. The adding of panels actually went deeper into the 1/537th refit molds altering the proportions whereas the removal of grid lines on the 1/350th STOS 1701 kept the same proportions--just wound up filling in the lines.
 

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I bought a tube of the Perfect Plastic Putty a few years ago to try on my first 22" eagle model. It had dried up inside the tube and was useless. So, I went back to the automotive red spot putty or homemade plastic putty. Since then, I have tried the Vallejo putty and have liked it.
Yes PPP does bond to polystyrene, don't know why it takes so long to dry though. Forgot to mention last night the good thing about PPP and Valejo putties is they can be applied an soothed using ones finger tips so sanding may not e needed.
Back when I sanded off all that extra paneling on the refit I placed pieces of masking tape over detailing like the botanical garden windows on the lower hull and when sanding very carefully close to the windows.

TrekAce... homemade plastic putty? Please elaborate? Also how is the Vallejo putty compared to, say, Tamiya White? Or other putties you've used?



irishtrek same question about the Vallejo... what are it's characteristics? Very curious...
 

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The Vallejo is about as thick as ketchup and can be smoothed out using your fingers, what I do is let it dry over night.
Same with the PPP for drying.
 

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The Vallejo is about as thick as ketchup and can be smoothed out using your fingers, what I do is let it dry over night.
Same with the PPP for drying.

irishtrek is the Vallejo water based, like PPP, I assume? What happens if you wet sand it, will it break up like I've experienced with PPP?
 

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That is odd to me, that PPP, after drying and, supposedly, bonding to the plastic, remains sufficiently water soluble enough to come off! That's not something you see in a water soluble epoxy. Once cured, I have never had issues with it getting wet and debonding or dissolving. I haven't tried wet sanding it. I use epoxy, typically, for repairs around the house or outside. Seems resistant to Arizona's harsh UV light and torrential monsoon rains.
 

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That is odd to me, that PPP, after drying and, supposedly, bonding to the plastic, remains sufficiently water soluble enough to come off! That's not something you see in a water soluble epoxy. Once cured, I have never had issues with it getting wet and debonding or dissolving. I haven't tried wet sanding it. I use epoxy, typically, for repairs around the house or outside. Seems resistant to Arizona's harsh UV light and torrential monsoon rains.

charonjr I had the same reaction when it happened! I was under the impression that the PPP would bond chemically to the plastic (like cement does) but instead I found that it is simply grabbing the plastic, not really reacting with and becoming part of it, like Tamiya or Squadron does. After I let a clump of PPP cure for a day on the end of a plastic strip, I started gently wiping at it with a cotton swab, and after about a minute or so the PPP started to moisten and de-bond. I was able to completely wash it off the plastic strip under the tap, and there were no traces of a chemical bond on the plastic. That being said, the odds of your model being doused in water and all the PPP you've used on it come washing off are vanishingly small, so no real danger there. For me personally, I am uncomfortable with the idea of a filler that is not bonded to the plastic. I typically will perform three or four putty applications during any given part of a build, so I want my putty to STAY stuck to my work during repeated handling, wet-sanding, etc. I guess, more than anything, it's the prohibition of wet-sanding that makes PPP a non-starter for me. Without wet sanding I would have to change my whole technique and approach to how I finish the surfaces on most of my builds, and that's not something I'm willing to do just for a product that calls itself "perfect."
 

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irishtrek is the Vallejo water based, like PPP, I assume? What happens if you wet sand it, will it break up like I've experienced with PPP?
I don't know if it's water based or not but the label says 100 % acrylic resin and it comes in the same size bottle as their paints.
Also PPP is just as thick as the squadron putty.
 

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Well, there we go. Acrylic resin wouldn't bond with plastic. It's like asking epoxy to bond to polypropylene. There's no electron orbitals to exchange with. You can roughen up the surfaces to be joined so that they have "tooth", which is what the epoxy with use to hold onto the surface. Superglue is the same way. There is no chemical bonding to the surface material itself, unlike a polystyrene glue.
 

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I've seen people just stick the correct Aztec details on top without sanding or filling and I thought it looked good. That's what I'm doing with mine.
That had occurred to me also, but have not seen any pics of how that looks. Let us know how that comes out! I am brushing up on my skills by working up all the Enterprise scale models until reaching the 1:350. Not sure if I want to put all the time into sanding.
 

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charonjr I had the same reaction when it happened! I was under the impression that the PPP would bond chemically to the plastic (like cement does) but instead I found that it is simply grabbing the plastic, not really reacting with and becoming part of it, like Tamiya or Squadron does. After I let a clump of PPP cure for a day on the end of a plastic strip, I started gently wiping at it with a cotton swab, and after about a minute or so the PPP started to moisten and de-bond. I was able to completely wash it off the plastic strip under the tap, and there were no traces of a chemical bond on the plastic. That being said, the odds of your model being doused in water and all the PPP you've used on it come washing off are vanishingly small, so no real danger there. For me personally, I am uncomfortable with the idea of a filler that is not bonded to the plastic. I typically will perform three or four putty applications during any given part of a build, so I want my putty to STAY stuck to my work during repeated handling, wet-sanding, etc. I guess, more than anything, it's the prohibition of wet-sanding that makes PPP a non-starter for me. Without wet sanding I would have to change my whole technique and approach to how I finish the surfaces on most of my builds, and that's not something I'm willing to do just for a product that calls itself "perfect."
It makes me glad that I live in a desert. I bought some PPP, which I haven't used yet. Twice a year, the monsoons hit us and humidity goes way up. Areas of the country that have humidity year round, could cause real trouble with PPP, if it can absorb moisture straight from the air. Would a flat coat seal it?
 

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charonjr I don't think that PPP will absorb moisture from the air once it's cured, and I am sure that a clear coat of flat or gloss would seal it. Just to clarify, I am not a fan of PPP because it doesn't chemically bond to the plastic and is too crumbly and brittle, once it's cured, for my taste. I have seen other folks on HT use it with no small degree of success, so I am not pretending to offer some expert advice backed up by years of research and experience. In places where I would use a one-part filler like PPP, (small cracks and gaps) I much prefer Tamiya White Putty, sometimes thinned with lacquer thinner and brushed on in stages. I like the Wave putty much more than PPP because once it's cured, it is solid, and absolutely will not react with anything ever again, including water, even if dunked in a tub full of it. For me, the brittle, crumbly nature of PPP gets me scared of future cracking/fracturing due to age or handling. It's just not a chance I am willing to take. Wave putty also does not chemically bond to the plastic, however, if there is sufficient surface prep with, say, 600 or 800 grit, then the Wave will hold on like iron, and I've used it with great satisfaction. Wave and Aves Apoxie Sculpt are the only two non-chemically binding fillers I use, because of their inherent strength, tenacity, and workability. Once again, it's difficult for me to see what is so "perfect" about that putty, for me it has none of the qualities I want to see in a filler, and all the issues that I don't want to see in a filler. Perfect Plastic Putty my astrolabe...


Disclaimer: The above statements are simply my experience with PPP. I am no putty expert, but I know 100% what works on my model builds and what doesn't.
 

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Agreed, gentlemen. After all, this place IS called HobbyTalk, right?

As an addendum to my last post, I just wanted to mention that different situations in my builds call for different putties, which is why I have 5 different types floating around my workbench during any given build. Small cracks and gaps are usually best dispensed with using my go-to, which is the Tamiya White putty. Chemically bonding, light, easy to sand/carve when cured, easy to work into small cracks and gaps, if I can't cut and fit plastic to fill with, that is. Also works great when thinned with lacquer thinner and brushed on in layers (just be careful not to thin too much or the lacquer thinner may attack the plastic). The non-chemically binding fillers (Wave and Aves) I primarily use for filling larger areas and re-shaping parts when doing modification. The benefit in that instance of using non-chemically binding filler is that it won't deform the plastic from troweling on large amounts of material that contain solvents, and you won't suffer a heart palpitation from inhaling large amounts of awful noxious fumes from the out-gassing. Once again, I try to use plastic to fill planar gaps and spaces as much as possible, minimizing the amount of differing materials I have stuck to my build, but in cases like my Yamato near the bow where I wanted to fill a very large depression, only a workable putty will do. The only other alternative IMO is vacuum-forming a new part, but I am way too lazy for that.
 

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I purchased a tube of PPP after reading some glowing reviews from other members. Its best to just throw your money in the trash can. You cant water sand it, it will dissolve iam surprised paint don't cause some kind of reaction . Its super brittle and extremely weak. It is reminds me of cake frosting its so thin i find that its hard to work with but it does sand very smooth. Iam sure someone will find a good use for it once they dig it out of the dumpster.
 

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No mention of Sprue Goo? I've always gotten good results cutting small pieces of sprue and then putting them into a bottle of Tamiya cement (the kind with the brush in the lid). Give it a day for the plastic to melt in the bottle and then you have liquid styrene putty that you can brush on to problem areas. You don't have to worry about material compatibility since it's the same styrene plastic, and the result is a seamless look.
 

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I purchased a tube of PPP after reading some glowing reviews from other members. Its best to just throw your money in the trash can. You cant water sand it, it will dissolve iam surprised paint don't cause some kind of reaction . Its super brittle and extremely weak. It is reminds me of cake frosting its so thin i find that its hard to work with but it does sand very smooth. Iam sure someone will find a good use for it once they dig it out of the dumpster.
Cake frosting is a good comparison. About the same consistency and density, and just as brittle. And no, wet sanding is not an option, the PPP will dissolve. Agreed, it does sand pretty smooth, but it is much softer and less dense than styrene, and I fear sanding would remove more PPP before plastic, resulting in depressions in the putty that need filling in (again). The flip side of that coin is, when using a filler like Aves, for example, which cures quite rigid and is more dense than the styrene, sanding will remove more plastic before filler. End result being a mal-formed part due to uneven removal of material. I have to be careful when sanding Aves that I don't dig out more of the surrounding plastic than the filler. It's a careful dance to get the right strength, workability, tenacity, and density in a putty to use on a plastic model. The closest thing I have found is the Wave putty.

No mention of Sprue Goo? I've always gotten good results cutting small pieces of sprue and then putting them into a bottle of Tamiya cement (the kind with the brush in the lid). Give it a day for the plastic to melt in the bottle and then you have liquid styrene putty that you can brush on to problem areas. You don't have to worry about material compatibility since it's the same styrene plastic, and the result is a seamless look.
That... is an interesting idea and I can't believe I haven't thought to try that yet. I could see how it might be a more viable method to fill in the panel lines on the ol' 1/537 kit. It would take quite a bit of glue, but you're right it's the same material, and you're gluing it on, so all you need is patience, but it will still need sanding of course. I think you might be on to something here...
 

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Cake frosting is a good comparison. About the same consistency and density, and just as brittle. And no, wet sanding is not an option, the PPP will dissolve. Agreed, it does sand pretty smooth, but it is much softer and less dense than styrene, and I fear sanding would remove more PPP before plastic, resulting in depressions in the putty that need filling in (again).
I had similar experience with it. Went and grabbed the two containers of it last used a couple of months ago and both were hard or partially hardened. Tossed 'em both.

Going back to bondo for the times I need such a thing. If it's just a small area, I use epoxy putty but it's not very friendly for doing large scale filling-in of grid lines.
 
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