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OK. I really need to stop reading what people post on other blogs. People can be so unkind, and judgmental. They see bondo and say it looks rotted. Before I see this again somewhere, and pull out what is left of my hair, I want to clarify some things.

First I want to say that Steve H., the prior owner of the shuttle, literally saved the ship from being scrapped back in 1986. If not for him it would not exist now. He restored it to the point where it could be displayed, and it is my understanding that it was at the 20th anniversary of Star Trek convention in Anaheim CA. There are famous photos of it after 12 years in the rain sitting at Rebel storage after being hauled from Roger H.s yard, and it was in sad condition before Steve's restoration. It looked like a cake that had melted in the rain.

To my knowledge $8,500 was spent to repair the shuttle at that time. Ken I. of the Smithsonian showed me photos of them painting it with a roller, and lettering it with a paint brush. For what they did, it looked pretty good. I don't know why it was placed back in storage, but that has always been a problem for the shuttle, since it was not really meant to last, and it does not do well when exposed to the elements. When I purchased it, Steve requested that I have it restored professionally, as he knew they could not restore it the way he wanted to due to the expense. I bought it sight unseen in some idiotic idea to keep it safe, and see it got a good home somewhere.

When I purchased it from him in 1989, it had been sitting out in the desert for many years at an RV storage facility in Palm Springs CA actually near Indio. The roof of the shuttle had again collapsed. Parts were missing, and there was a lot of damage that doesn't really show on that video.

The shuttle was supposed to be a display at the Superman Exposition in Cleveland Ohio back in 1988. There were Star Trek guests and exhibits at the convention, which was supposed to raise money to build a Superman Museum. This museum never materialized.

I attended that convention as I was collecting comic books at the time, and I was disappointed that the Galileo 7 was a no show. The reason given was that the truck driver who was supposed to haul it said he could not because it was in such poor condition.

Even after being carted across the country to Akron Ohio, there was 80 lb. of sand taken out of it, mixed with pistachio nut hulls I might add. The sides were both split in the center of the panels from top to bottom. The nacelles were badly dented and still full of vines from sitting as a lawn ornament in Roger H.s yard. The tubular steel undercarriage was rusting. The starboard side Masonite was so rotten, from years of sitting out in the rain, that it would fall apart in your hands. So were parts of the front. The roof beams were so badly dry rotted that they mushed when you touched them. There were missing molded metal strips on 2/3 of the rounded edges of the roof and bottom. The port side of the ship was Masonite too, but we did not try to replace this. The decision was to try to repair that side.

When I bought it in 1989, sight unseen, I wrongly assumed that all I would have to do was clean it up a bit. After all, the photos I saw at the time showed it looking fairly good, and if you look at the video you might think so too. Up close was a different matter.

My original intention was to try and find a place to donate it. After storing it for 2 years out there in California, and not finding any place that would accept it as an exhibit, I began to worry that I was so far away from it that I could not keep track of it, so at great expense it was moved to Akron Ohio where I live, and was placed in a hangar at the Akron Fulton Airport. This was a hangar where they used to make corsairs in WWII, and next door to the Goodyear Airdock. This was the first time in who knows how long it had been housed inside.

It was exciting to show it to my friends in a local Star Trek club. But, as we started to look closely, the many problems became clear. Any restoration would not be easy and quick. I knew that I could not restore it myself, I would have to pay someone to do the work. The club made it clear they would not be interested in helping in any way, but they did want it at their convention, which I allowed free of charge. They did however, make an appearance one day at the restoration site more of a photo op than anything else.

I tried to sell T-Shirts at Star Trek conventions, and this went well the one time that the shuttle was actually at the convention. I actually sold $3,200 in T-shirts that weekend. However, trying to sell T-Shirts to the fans at conventions without the shuttle being there was a total bust. My conclusion was that the “fans” did not care what happened to the shuttle then under restoration. It was all in my lap. They would rather walk by my table and spend $12 on a phony looking tribble.

I thought to have it at conventions, but although they made promises none of the conventions would pay anything to have it there. Sometimes they would act interested, make an offer then at the last moment withdraw that offer and say all they could give me was a free dealer’s table for transporting it hundreds of miles. Again, fan run conventions.

Two local men wanted very badly to do the restoration, and after a lot of begging on their part, talking and making them promise to do a good job I relented, and their proposal was that I was to pay them $12,000, half of which was for parts and supplies, the other half to be paid upon completion. There was no contract as these were friends. They would give me bills and I reimbursed them, or I would give them cash up front. By this point, the shuttle was being housed in a private T-Hangar at the Akron Canton Airport.

These two were modelers, and one in particular was very meticulous in his work. He had a really amazing model of the Death Star constructed from a ping pong ball. And, I have to say that the work they did on replacing the rotten parts of the shuttle was also meticulously done, if not startling to watch, and you can see most of it in a well-known video on YouTube. The work that was done was good and it was precise, and we had gotten to the point where all that was needed to be done was fiber glassing and painting. Almost finished, and I was so very happy the end was near. That was in 1991.

But, then the work slowed down, and they hardly ever went out to work on it. It was at that time and perhaps before that the two men decided they would not continue the work, and walked out on me. There have been some who said I had money problems, but of course I did, but always reimbursed them as agreed to except when they decided I should pay for their lunch at Wendy's. Primarily this was due to unrest in their personal lives and to something I said. I had made a comment in front of one of their wives that it was going so slowly, and that is was costing me so much to store it. This was taken as "ingratitude". No amount of begging would keep them on the job, as the wives were already unhappy that they had become involved in the restoration to begin with. So, this was the point where it could have been finished, and it wasn't. I have often wondered how they could come so far on the restoration and then just give it up. They even wrote their names and the date on each part they restored. Now the credit for the restoration will go to whomever buys it.

Then I was laid off from my job as an engineer. Even when laid off I continued to pay the rent on the hangar, working three jobs to pay all my bills, and the shuttle ate before I did.

Some have told me I should have sought help on the Internet, that some fan or fans would have helped. But, think about it, this was circa 1992, and the Internet was not what it is today, and I had no access to it really. And, my experience with fans had not been good ones. I had tried to find a home for it for years. At this point, all I could do was store it, and forget about finishing it.

Eventually, I got back on my feet. New job, and I found a company to finish restoring the shuttle. It was in Akron and the contract was with an automobile body shop with a sandblasting company next door. The deal was $14,000 for the remaining work on the restoration, fiberglass and painting. We planned a special gel coat that would have hidden some defects. Whenever they finished a stage, I was billed and I paid for it. Most of the dents were pulled from the nacelles, that showed. Nacelles and other metal parts were sandblasted and primed in preparation for painting. As before, all was paid for as I was billed.

I offered more money to speed up the work. I was told they had so much other work, but they would be getting to it. I began to lose confidence, as I had been snookered so many times by people making promises they did not keep.

The shuttle was to be stored inside the building, and the owner of the business showed me where he planned to have it. I was working in Columbus at the time, and was caretaker for my mother as her health was failing. This and work kept me busy. When I came back to Akron, I would go out to the site at Mill Street, and express my unhappiness that the shuttle was still sitting outside with a tarp on it, but I was assured that it was ok and any imperfections would be fixed when they worked on it. Always promises.

My Mom died and I moved back to Akron. No one was there to help. I kept requesting, through a mutual friend, that the two who had promised to finish the ship back in 1991 return to help, but each time I was told by her that they had no interest. During this time when I was in Columbus, the tarp had blown off the shuttle and it had been exposed to rain again. Luckily it had been waterproofed, and marine plywood had been used in the new repairs.

One day the call came to remove the shuttle from the lot where they had it parked as the owner of the business was going to jail and the lot was to be razed. I had one day to move it, and it was not an easy thing to move. I flew around in a panic and managed to find a towing company that would do the work, and used my garage to repair the flat tires on the trailer. It was hauled to a boat storage area near my house, where it was shrink-wrapped. That is where the shuttle is now looking so much like a boat you wouldn't even notice it. I barely managed to retrieve parts from their building, and was lucky enough to find someone there the next day. In a rush to retrieve the parts I somehow missed the blow molded nacelle domes I had paid Gene Winfield to fabricate.

I have decided that I will not finish the restoration. Someone else will have to do that. It is frustrating to have gotten so close to finishing it twice. But, I tried for 23 years to do the right thing. I did not make any money, and I do not owe anyone any money either. Instead, I spent 23 years paying to restore it, and to keep it alive.

The pictures to the untrained eye make it look bad, I know this. Perhaps, I should have thrown a coat of paint over it, but anyone wanting to finish the restoration does not need that as they can see what is sound and what remains to be done.

Descriptions on the Internet of it as rotting are from unfair people who can't tell bondo from peanut butter. Believe me there will be a lot more bondo spread on the hull, before it is fiberglassed. If they would take the time to really look at the pictures they would see that so much work has been done on the craft. So, take a walk in my shoes, and do not judge me as I have done my best as the previous owner did his best. Now it is time for someone new and hopefully with money to finish the job. And, I wish them well.
 

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Kickstarter has worked for a lot

Lyndie, here is a link to the kickstarer homepage.

http://www.kickstarter.com/


And hats off for doing an amazing job keeping the old girl alive. Regardless of her condition, there are a great many fans who are forever grateful that she simply still exists. Thank you for your efforts and continued diligence in finding her a new and worthy home. :thumbsup:
 

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Does Starfleet International have a Medal of Honor? 'Cause this sure sounds like dedication above and beyond the call of duty.

As for kickstarter, I suspect that ship has already sailed.
 

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Thanks

Thank you guys for listening. I will be so glad when the shuttle is in other hands, and I can fade into obscurity. I bet there are others out there who have restored other artifacts with similar tales to tell. Just let this be a lesson to anyone who thinks buying a spaceship is a good idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #208
Thank you guys for listening. I will be so glad when the shuttle is in other hands, and I can fade into obscurity.
LOL, like it or not Lynne, that won't really happen as far as the fans and Trek prop lore go. You have secured for yourself a place in the history books, as it were, albeit unintentionally.
Imagine this for example: your car breaks down in any state in America... you pop online & state you problem & who you are and instantly have a fan respond with a place for you to stay for the night. Probably even come & pick you up.
I think you are held in higher regard by us than you might realize.
 

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Discussion Starter #210
I need a "IF NOT FOR LYNDIE, THE GALILEO WOULD BE WITH THE ORIGINAL SERIES GALACTICA VIPER MOCK UP RIGHT NOW." tee shirt.:thumbsup:
 

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And where is this viper now?
From: http://www.galactica.tv/battlestar-galactica-1978-news/battlestar-galactica-colonial-viper-mock-up.html

Where is it now? For many years the Battlestar Galactica full scale Viper mock-up languished in semi-outdoor storage behind one of the false front buildings on Universals Studios "New York" street back lot. Then came a fire that burned down that portion of the back lot and it is presumed that the Viper went with it. It is also possible that it was scrapped even before the fire, like so many of the other studio "spaceships".
:cry:
 

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Wow. The Galileo also languished on the back lot of Paramount for many years. It was used as a rendevous. I was going to make a bumper sticker for it Dont' Come Knockin' if the Shuttle's Rockin'

It seems like there should be a museum just for these kind of things where the large props can be donated by the studios.
 

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One of the ideas I've been nursing, should my home team be lucky enough to nab the Galileo, is producing a documentary, covering the construction all the way up to arriving at the Wings Over The Rockies museum and the beginning of the latest round of restoration work.

Of course, that's dependent on the shuttle coming here. If it winds up in Dubai, fergit it.
 

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If I were a certain Oil Prince, I would secure a decent set of drawings, hire an aviation architect and build one from aircraft grade aluminum with working everything. Lightweight, strong, and a bitchin kick in the pants !
 
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