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Discussion Starter #1
I have an Ariens 22-ton log splitter with a Subaru EA175V engine.

While splitting wood with the splitter in the vertical position I stopped the engine to take a break. Upon returning and pulling on the cord I experienced kick-back. After a few tries and a very sore wrist called it a day.

A few days later the same thing, changed plug, no water in the gas, tried to adj the valves but the rocker is wobbly when the piston is at TDC. The valves do go up and down with plug removed, there is no resistance or very minimal.

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks, John
 

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As it ran ok until shut down, and didn't die on you I'd suspect the compression release return spring broke. While it could also be an ignition timing problem such as a sheared flywheel key or variable timing coil that's stuck in full advance; valve timing problem (timing shift); or a valve lash issue, I'm going with comp-release issue as my first choice.
Try pulling it over with the spark plug lead grounded. If it's harder to pull over than it used to be, comp-release problem. Let us know...
 

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Thanks, hopefully, it's the spring if it's the flywheel key(good possibility) big job beyond my capabilities. Coil was on my list of things to check. Will try a couple of things before giving up. I Will let you know of the outcome. Thanks for taking the time to respond.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Took engine housing off. Noticed that the gap between the coil and flywheel was off, recalibrated. Checked coil, no reading, ordered a new one. Did try starting it but still had kick-back. Couldn't find the compression release spring, only springs visible where on the carb.
 

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Compression release spring is inside the engine, on the camshaft. Since you're experienced with valves, here's how to manually check for the comp-rel. working.
Remove spark plug. Pull engine over slowly, as exhaust valve closes, engine should achieve TDC. At TDC on exhaust stroke, is the period called valve-overlap. Both valves should be open a bit. This period check is also instrumental to check valve timing. Years ago with pressed-on crank timing gears we'd see one split and then rotate out of time on occasion. Anyway, from there you want to watch either valve (newer engines deko on the intake, older ones on the exhaust) during the compression stroke. One of them should bump open a bit during that stroke. If not, cam deko problem. If so and valve lash is correct, you have an ignition problem of sorts.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
With your help, it seems that it might be the spring(I did eventually find it, through the manual) or the key. I decided to tackle the job if it doesn't include opening the complete engine.

Thank-you. You have been very supportive.

Jay Jay
 
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