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Hello, I am posting some pictures of my Stug III that I am currently working on and would like some feedback. This is my first military model, although I have done a little Warhammer 40k in the past, which is much different and have been wanting to get into the hobby for a while. I have decided to go with the three color camo scheme but am not sure if it is completly right.

The first main question I have is about weathering. I want to give the model a dirty, dusty look but don't want it to look muddy. I would also like to add oil stains where they would be on the real thing (which I have no clue). My plan so far is to finish painting deatils, coat in future, apply decals, weather. But I dont really know how to weather. Any objections to the plan?

Lastly, I don't know what color to paint the tracks. I have seen pictures where they look black and others where they look tan. Does the weathering turn the black tracks tan, or are they a entirely different color?

All comments both positive and negative (constructive of course:tongue:) are appreciated!

p.s. My camera didn't get the color quite right and I can't figure out why. It looks different in person.
 

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Nice colour scheme. I'm no expert, but for weathering without mud, two techniques I know of are to highlight the edges with pencil to suggest worn metal, or highlight the same edges with dark brown or brick red, to suggest tarnished or rusted metal. Tracks should probably be the colour of the terrain where the campaign was, Russian Steppe, Normandy hedgerows, etc. Without mud, tracks look good dusty but with shiny bare metal showing through from road wear.
 

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Weathering

I don't build armour kits typically (mostly aircraft) but some of the aircraft weathering techniques will also work on armour. A wash can bring out details along your kit's panels. You can use thinned oil paint, thinned enamal, or ground pastels (in water and a little dishwashing soap). After your future coat (let cure at least 24 hours), use an old brush to apply your wash in the panel grove (capilary action will let it flow along the line). After a few minutes, you can remove the excess wash with q-tips, lightly dabbed in thinner. You can also use drybrushing techniques to bring out details, whether metallic or rust effects. Dip an old brush in some paint (metallic color, grey, or whatever color you would like to use to highlight an area, usually lighter or darker to offer contrast), then remove most of the paint with a paper towell. Brush along edges and other sections that stand out until you can see the details showing.

Lot's of modeling websites offer great tips and galleries to give you ideas - a good armour site is missing lynx at: http://missing-lynx.com!
 
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