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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey hobbytalk members. I recently started getting into scale model building again. I used to build models when I was ten years old now I'm 22 and haven built anything since I was twelve. I started with that model that Revell came out with of the 1/72 scale SR-71 Blackbird with the D-21 recon drone and it came out pretty well even without painting it. But I ordered and I am waiting on a 1/24 scale model of a 1970 doge challenger 2 in 1 by by the same brand. I got the spray paints today and I'm still waiting the model kit, glue, and some more brush cleaner to get me started on scale model car building. Does anyone think that a 3oz can of competition orange spray enamel by testors would be enough and look good on a 1970 challenger model? I even got some primer to help it turn out good and to prevent flaking or bubbling when I use the orange on the cars body.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Just got the dodge challenger today

I received my Revell 1/24 scale 1970 dodge challenger today. I messed up on the body while I was painting!! Now I gotta order a new body for my challenger build.:( Does anyone know if I can send my model car body parts to be pained by a pro? I can paint mechanical and engine parts no problem, but when it comes to auto body painting for scale models I suck! It could also be the paint I was using. I guess I should try an airbrush or something next time.
 

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First, welcome ta de Hobbytalk boards!!!!
Second a 3 0z. can of spray paint is more than enough for a 1/24 scale car model, heck 'tis even enough for a 1/16 scale car model.
And before you go and order a replacement body why not try and clean up the one that got messed up??? Just soak it in some original Pine-Sol over night, that should remove most of the messed up paint. And there are folks on here who will say to use something else to remove the paint, but just remember what ever you choose to do it with it is your choice. Heck if you've already went and ordered a new body then clean up the first one and practice spray painting it by spraying back and forth a bit on the slow side but keep the paint can about 12 inches away from the part that you are painting.
Oh yes, there are builders on here who will build it for you for a price of course. But where's the fun in that??:wave:
 

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Welcome. Don't give up on painting! irishtrek has some good pointers. Be patient and practice, it takes a while before you learn how to lay down a nice paint job. I find that Testor's lacquer paints and Tamiya's are a lot easier to work with than enamels. But they are a little more pricier.
 

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Welcome to the Model Car page of HobbyTalk, modelfan 217, and welcome to the model car hobby! :thumbsup:

As dge467 said, lacquers are generally easier to work with. Lacquers are much more forgiving than enamels and polish out to a better shine. Be sure to prime the plastic with any spray paint, especially lacquers and automotive spray touch-up paint (my weapon of choice!). You can get great results with spray cans, it just takes patience. You won't get professional results right off the bat, but that's the way it goes with ANYTHING worthwhile. First thing to remember regardless of what type of paint you decide to use is to always wash the part first to remove any dust, skin oils, mold release agent, etc. Do this before doing any work on the body to avoid working these contaminants into the plastic, and again before painting. Then, be sure to scuff the plastic with fine sandpaper to givethe paint something to "bite" onto. Do that after priming as well, not only for the first reason but to level the surface as well.

I don't have an airbrush. Basically, I can't afford one along with the compressor and all the other paraphernalia that goes along with it. Also, I like the ease of just picking up a rattle can, warming it in some warm tap water for a few minutes to help it flow out better, give it the old "shake 'n' rattle" routine for a minute or so, and lay down the paint. No mixing, no cleaning of equipment when you're done beyond upending the can to clear the nozzle and washing out the pan you had your warm water in!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the advice on spray painting

You all give good, logical advice. I am thinking about getting tamiya brand spray paint for my next try. The problem I was having was the lines for the trunk and hood vents below the wind shield were getting flooded with paint to where you cant see them and the primer I used made the orange paint bubble up on certain corners. I think its because I was rushing it out of excitement to see what it would look like. I think I might go with an air brush starter kit made by testors for around $25 I saw on amazon to hopefully get better results. Does anyone have tips on how to paint emblems and window frames and other small body details? That I know will be challenging.
 

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You don't paint window frames - you Bare Metal Foil them ! You can use foil for belting, badgework, dash board and door trim, etc. It's not as hard to use as you might think.

I did my Challenger with Testors lacquer Hemi Orange







Too bad I never finished the kit... wound up throwing it away. It was already kinda dusty when I photographed it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I decided to recover the body of my kit that I messed up on. And a day before garbage pick up to! what is the best thing to remove the old paint without damaging any of the molded details?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Nice build man! it looks allot better than the one I'm working on now. I'm still in the process of assembling and painting it. I have the 2012 Revell two in one T/A 340 6 pack hard top edition.
 

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You all give good, logical advice. I am thinking about getting tamiya brand spray paint for my next try. The problem I was having was the lines for the trunk and hood vents below the wind shield were getting flooded with paint to where you cant see them and the primer I used made the orange paint bubble up on certain corners. I think its because I was rushing it out of excitement to see what it would look like.
It sounds to me like your problem was technique, not the paint you used. Don't try to paint the body in one shot. Hold the can 8"-12" from whatever you're painting, use multiple light coats, and build the paint up slowly until you've achieved complete coverage. If you miss a spot, cover it with the next coat. And never ever hold the can in one spot; keep it moving. Practice and patience are the key.

One tip I've learned about using rattle cans--warm 'em up before you spray. I put mine in a plastic bag (so the can won't rust) and soak them in a bucket filled with hot tap water for 10-15 minutes, shake them to thoroughly mix the paint (at least 30-60 seconds), then spray. The heated paint is slightly less viscous, so it flows out of the can and spreads over the surface of the model easier, giving you a smoother finish.

Preparation is also important. Always clean the parts to remove any traces of mold release before you do anything else. I spray mine with undiluted Simple Green (a lot of modelers use dish soap or other products), give them a good scrubbing with an old toothbrush, rinse them with warm water, and let them dry thoroughly. And I always use primer. A lot of modelers don't like primer because they say it obscures fine detail and/or it's unnecessary, but in my experience it does exactly what it's supposed to do--it creates a better bond between the paint and the plastic.

I think I might go with an air brush starter kit made by testors for around $25 I saw on amazon to hopefully get better results.
I've been building models for more than 40 years and I've never used an airbrush, but I've heard from numerous modelers that these starter kits aren't much better than rattle cans. Again, I'd practice your technique before spending money on a tool that might be more frustrating than useful.
 

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You can soak the body in a plastic container filled with Super Clean or Simple Green Concentrate. That will remove the paint fairly quickly and easily. When it lifts off, scrub with a tooth brush. It will also remove chrome... FYI
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the heads up on airbrushing stuff. I guess rattle cans are allot cheaper to.
I was thinking if I try an air brush I would get a more presision spray and a more even
coat of paint. But I also need to save money in this crazy economy which is why I went
rattle cans first. I might give air brushing a try one of these days. I just want to avoid the bubble effect I was getting when I used spray paint on a model car, but I know now why it happens. I just need to be more carefull nextime I re-paint my challenger.
 

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You might also look into joining a model building club in your area, check with your local hobbyshop for details on how to contact a club and don't be afraid to ask for advice from club members. And in the long run painting with an airbrush is going to be a hell of a lot cheaper money wise than going out and buy can after can of spray paint. and the Tamya and half of the Testors bottle paints are acrilyc, which means they can be thinned with water and brushes can be cleaned with water or even rubbing alcohol
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I'm putting this project on hold

Because I can't seem to get a good paint job, after my first screw up, I'm putting the challenger build on hold for now. I think I owe it to you guys to let you know. I'm getting an airbrush kit and I'm going to start practicing using plastic scrap to see how I do. Then if I can get a new body for my '70 challenger I'm going to complete the build and try to post a good set of pictures of it completed. I'm going to start fresh in a couple of weeks and get a 1/24 scale '66 Shelby mustang GT350 by Revell. Not giving up, just trying a different approach.
 
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