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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys!

Doug here. I have 2 questions:

1. Of all the 1:64 scale vehicles, M2, Greenlight, Auto World, etc...which ones (if any) have working spring suspension?

2. This is one of many quirks about me, that folks find "unusual". I have modified many a car and truck model so that the springs work. So, have any of you done this? Care to give us details?

One of my best works (long gone now), was an "O" scale Greyhound Super Scenicruiser. This one by Corgi:



It ended up being the best work I did! So, I modified this as well:



Needless to say, the value dropped drastically, but I don't collect for value! But I like working suspension! Do I hear an amen? The one tool I cannot do without is the Dremel!

Doug
 

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Amen!
Love working suspension. wish they all had it.

Maybe not need in the makers you mentioned (none have it), but the more toy-like brands
like MB & HW should ALL have it.

That's pretty dad gum cool you made a bouncy bus!
Any pix of the internals?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Amen!
Love working suspension. wish they all had it...the makers you mentioned (none have it)
Ahh. So I'd have to modify. Not hard.

That's pretty dad gum cool you made a bouncy bus!
Any pix of the internals?
I wish I did. All that stuff was lost in the foreclosure! Every last diecast and model I had. I did recover some stuff. All of my Magic Tricks (I"m an amateur magician), and my CDs were recovered.

But this hobby I had to completely start over. As far as how to do it, see this pic?



I pretty much did the same thing, except I tacked the steel strip in the center of the rear wheel axles. I also wallowed out the axle holes or added styrene pieces to extend the travel. See this?



That is ripe for this! A bit of extending is needed on those side slots, or the axles fall out. A bit of JB Weld can be molded for such a thing.

My GOSH! It's 5pm! I have been at this all day! This info is hard to find! This is typical for a sick puppy like me. My Dad used to rail on me, "Son...people drive cars! They don't care about the springs!" Well, I did! But then I had a fascination with bowling pin setting machines, elevators and flush toilets, so...:freak:

Doug
 

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Amen!

The metal strip down the middle is exactly how Matchbox made their suspensions in the past.
Hot Wheels had a slightly different set up I think way way back.

I opened this related thread in the M2 forum once if anyone wants to check it out. http://www.hobbytalk.com/bbs1/209-m2-machines/391825-how-m2-could-learn-matchbox.html About how M2 could enhance their cars using simple techniques that Matchbox once used or pioneered. As always, the risk of product infringement discourages the implementation of anything exactly like another brand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Amen!

The metal strip down the middle is exactly how Matchbox made their suspensions in the past.

Hot Wheels had a slightly different set up I think way way back.
Was it Matchbox?? Flaps...you might be spot on! I was thinky Dinking, err...Dicky thinkin....DRAT! Thinking DINKY! Whew! Dinky Toys. But I had Matchbox before that! Yes!! The Dinky 1:43 came later. I got the idea from Matchbox! Well, son of a...

Hot Wheels used a torsion-type system. Well, not exactly. The axles themselves acted as springs. But some of my diecast cars had no suspension. I fixed that! Mwahh haha! Today you can cut up a soda can to make springs. Just sayin'...

I have tried many things and failed at most of them. I find brass very useful. Your local hardware store can hook you up with many types of small springs like these:



Your parts and spares needs a large assortment of these in just about any hobby:



I opened this related thread in the M2 forum once if anyone wants to check it out. About how M2 could enhance their cars using simple techniques that Matchbox once used or pioneered.
Thanks! I'll check that thread out! Funny, Dinky and Corgi used the method Matchbox did. The spring strip was riveted in the center and sprung both front and rear wheels.

As always, the risk of product infringement discourages the implementation of anything exactly like another brand.
Eeep! Thanks! Yeppers! But did Matchbox invent the idea? Or? Dunno. Very little info on that.

Doug
 

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Dear Doug:

Amen to that for I do like how the buses bounce in the rear when they do turns.(Love buses period).One of the diecasts whose chassis fell out showed me the metallic principle of suspension (I think it was from the my Zylmex 'Cuda - the rivet failed and now is held - via a friend of mine - by screws).Today's diecast is just too rigid - well done but the time of many working features as in the past is either long gone or they ask an arm and a leg for it.

Also notice that Tomica still has suspension systems - at least the ones I bought last year still had.

Nick K
 

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Eeep! Thanks! Yeppers! But did Matchbox invent the idea? Or? Dunno. Very little info on that.
I don't know for sure either if Matchbox were the first to use the spring plate design, although Lesney was using it by the 60's at least. They may have just been the most prominent producer to use it. The oldest vehicle I have with a working factory suspension is a Dinky Nash Rambler from the late-50's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I don't know for sure either if Matchbox were the first to use the spring plate design, although Lesney was using it by the 60's at least. They may have just been the most prominent producer to use it. The oldest vehicle I have with a working factory suspension is a Dinky Nash Rambler from the late-50's.
Most of my Dinky 1:48s had spring suspension using the spring plate design. The one rigid suspension was this:



That torked me off. So, I modified it. It worked nice! I had an idea how to make the doors open and close, but I did not know how to cut metal then:



But the spring suspension worked the way Dinky SHOULD have made it. But damn-well didn't for whatever reason.

Doug
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Continuing in this topic, have any of you made workable steering on your diecasts? What scale? I have tried and failed on a few attempts! 1:64 seems impossible!

Doug
 

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Tomica are still making cars with suspension to this day. Definitely TLV but if you want to be sure that basic series models have it, you need to buy older ones from before the production went to Vietnam. As for current models, some seem to have lost the suspension (an Infiniti/Nissan Skyline I have for example). The pre-Vietnam basics roll and feel quite like 1980s Matchbox.

As for the steering in 1/64, you might want to get inspired by Lesney/Matchbox again. Some models used to have a steering feature where you press down on a front fender, whichever side you wanted it to go, and it would steer there. The Ford Cortina comes to mind, and that's the Lesney one, not the Superfast. If you find a cheap example and take it apart, you might see what's going on and work from there. Just an idea.
 

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The metal strip down the middle is exactly how Matchbox made their suspensions in the past.
Hot Wheels had a slightly different set up I think way way back.
Any Matchbox I've seen used plastic strips - from the mid '60s to at least the early '80s (Lesney years.)
Did later ones have metal springs?

As far as early early Hot Wheels, their metal springs were actually torsion bars (the metal twisted).

1:64 Huskys from Corgi had the springs cut right into the plastic base.
Other brands have done this also in later years.

Radiodugger, curious if your home made springs are made from real spring steel or plain steel.
They look like the real thing. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Radiodugger, curious if your home made springs are made from real spring steel or plain steel.
They look like the real thing. :thumbsup:
Those springs in the pic above? No those are not home made! LOL! I collect springs for my parts box. But so far, I have not used coil springs. I have considered actually constructing real leaf springs for 1:25 scale cars and trucks. This site is AWESOME!

Working Leaf Springs

If only I could photo etch spring steel:



See, this does not look that hard to do:



Brass, I'm not sure of. I want a bit of travel, and brass is too soft.

As far as steering goes, This is the mod I would have loved to have made on that school bus above:



I ain't done yet. Thoughts?

Doug
 

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In regards to at "suspension" travel. Two 3 inch makes I have that have a suspension like movement to them are

1) Jada products. They seem to be on a center pivot point at the front and rear axles and will move both wheels together with each other if you push on them. Meaning if you push one down into the upside down car - the other wheel moves up. If sitting on all four wheels though - one side travels together (both front and rear) at the same time.

2) I did find a Kidco Split window that does move independently at all four corners. No ideal on the age though.
 

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Any Matchbox I've seen used plastic strips - from the mid '60s to at least the early '80s (Lesney years.)
Did later ones have metal springs?
Not sure about the regular cars, but this Premiere from the 90's that I opened (screwed base) had a metal spring plate, and other Premieres probably do to.


 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
1:64 is too small to make the leaf springs I showed previously. 1:24/25 and larger is feasible. Ideally, 1:18 would be desirable, but I think the First Gear, 1:34 might be possible. I need a "First Gear" junk box.

First Gear makes the BEST truck models I have ever seen! But, Winross in 1:64 has some unique features. Anyone familiar with Winross?



The suspension on these is quite unique! I gotta break out my camera and show ya...

Doug
 

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First Gear makes the BEST truck models I have ever seen! But, Winross in 1:64 has some unique features. Anyone familiar with Winross?
From what I know of Winross, they were the promotional rig of choice before First Gear, and DCP. I agree, First Gear makes some knock out stuff. I bought my first one about five or six years ago - this 1:64 International 4800 with reefer trailer. And after that, more plasticky pieces from M2 don't do it for me. So for anyone who goes First Gear, you will be spoiled!












 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Wow! That is beautiful! Spendy I bet! Worth it, though. Look at the detail! In 1:64!! Yep. Gonna get me some o' that! Today, I'm setting up my cam and my Winross trucks! Hopefully we can show ya some suspension!

Doug
 
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