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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Found yesterday at the NAMAC swapmeet in Houten, the Netherlands.
The original 911 was actually called 901, but after complaints by Peugeot who thought to own the '0' in the middle of their car numbers, Porsche changed the 901 name to 911.
This Porsche by Siku was released almost at the same time with the 'real' 901, but never bothered to update the baseplate, which still reads 901... Cool trivia! :thumbsup:





 

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That's a tough one to get; I've never seen it in that color before. I always loved how lots of the old Siku models have rhinestones for headlights.
 

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Never new the story with 901 and 911...thanks for the cool info. :)
How old is this casting...over 40 years? It looks very precisely and well made. It looks detailed even by recent standards.
 

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Superbird77 said:
Never new the story with 901 and 911...thanks for the cool info. :)
How old is this casting...over 40 years? It looks very precisely and well made. It looks detailed even by recent standards.
It came out in 1964; it's pretty old.
 

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Model Murdering
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More Porsche Trivia

I just joined HT about 2 months ago. The first 911 was shown at the 1963 Frankfurt auto show. Although Porsche changed all their chrome script and literature due to Peugot's protests many 1:1 porsche parts carried the 901 prefix for a few years and beyond. A big deal at the time, it became much to do about nuthin'. Like "Pewgut" ever did anything worthwhile with the 901 designation. Who's laughin' now?! :tongue: The 911 chassis prefix first appeared in 1969, and many internals still carried a 901 number. I'm no diecast expert. I do find it puzzling that Siku modeled this 911 with the dual outlet sport exhaust which was never available on 911 production models. :rolleyes: The sport muffler was a factory racing part. It first appeared on the 1810 pound superlightweight "911R" in 1967, and required modification of the rear valence. It became a sport option. I still make one now and then for "vintage racer wannabe" customers. The wrap around bumper trim on the pictured Siku appears like a later version as well. I've worked on air cooled Porsche and VW for 30 years. I still tinker a bit on 1:1 911's, collect Marklin HO trains, Aurora T-jets, and the occasional cool diecast car if it strikes my fancy. Regardless of the YOM that's one cool, ancient 911 and a rare duck! :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for this information, it is very informative!

My daily driver is a 944S and is maintained by a shop that is also specialized in the elder 911's and the front engined Porsches. I visit them often, not for repairs, but for the friendly chat.
On saturday afternoon it is like a small car show at their parking lot when lots of enthousiasts show up... :thumbsup:
 

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Thanks Henri

Henri Kroeze said:
Thanks for this information, it is very informative.
:wave: Hi Henri, Sorry to hijack your post. I was just lurking around and spotted your cool Siku 901. I had to throw my 2 cents in. Bugs, busses, 356, 911, 912, were a big part of my life. I sorta lost passion when the water pumpers came out. Dont get me wrong I've repaired quite a few 944's, a beautiful car in it's own right and the hands down favorite of the pumpers. Just too divergent from the original theme for me. Antifreeze??!! Whats that? Oh now look! Somebody put an engine in my trunk! :p I have a 911 RSR type clone that I have owned for 20 years. It was originally a 911T with the S suspension and brake package set up for club racing, It was converted and campaigned in RS trim in the mid eighties. A regular winner as an autocrosser, with several Porsche Club regional championships. It was a well known car in the region. I got stopped many times by people asking where Ken (the original owner) was and why was I driving his car? Ironically I had found this car in storage with a blown motor and trans. It's been an ongoing project for two decades. I drove it around in the irish green colored RS configuration for 10 years. I stripped and restored this car in 1996 and fattened the body work with all steel panels. It basically looks like an RSR without that stupid duck tail. I changed the color to Sumatra green(a factory 914 color). The motor is a blue printed Weber carbed Eurospec 2.7 coupled to an '82 911 SC gearbox. It's now a regular winner on our local show circuit and still a people magnet. ;) I'm currently working on restoring a red '67 targa for my wife, and an orange 71 targa for an old customer. I enjoy Lurking through the diecast posts and learning from you guys. Knowledge is power! I shed a little tear for my 150 or so 60's vintage Corgi, Matchbox, and early Hotwheels that mom sent to the rummage sale years ago. Another one of the tragic stories we're all too familiar with. :( PS: I also noticed that your 901 has no fuel door on top of the driver side fender, which is a curious ommision considering the other interesting details on this model. I will now return to lurking in the shadows. LOL - Bill
 

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HENRI!

You have outdone yourself - what a gorgeous toy model! Shape, fit, finish, and even rhinestone eyes and regular wheels. Lovely.
 
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