Hobbyist Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,425 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The compressor in question is an old Campbell Hausfeld Weekender. When I plug it in, it starts building up pressure, and shuts off before reaching max...taking the garage lights with it! I then have to go outside and reset all the breakers. The power cord has some pretty worn insulation, as does the regulator cord, which could probably stand to be taped up a little better. I cleaned up the contacts on the cord, and should probably run some oil through the motor, as well.

Any ideas as to what is causing this issue, and whether I should fix or replace it? I'd really like to fix it, as it can operate over a wide pressure range, is USA-made, and didn't cost me anything.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,988 Posts
A-A,

It sure sounds like your compressor is shorting out somewhere. If you feel confident that you can safely replace the worn leads, then on the assumption that the motor's in good enough shape, I'd say it is cheaper to keep her. If you're not confident in your electrical skills you might A: take the compressor in to be serviced, unless you learn that doing so would cost more than the alternative, namely B: buy a new compressor.

My Campbell-Hausfield has proven to be a tough little monkey. It is several years old and when it's not powering my airbrushes it's still inflating my car tires. That's why I'm not recommending that you scrap yours if it can be at all saved.

Best of luck with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,466 Posts
Question?

is any of the wires getting warm/HOT?
is the motor getting HOT?

if just the wires and you can replace them. try it.
also. If you can NOT replace the wires.. try the local hardware store. they might do it for cheap.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,088 Posts
It sounds to me like it could be some type of thermally related short. The fact that it runs at all is the odd part when later it is likely shorting as it pops your breakers. It might possibly be the wiring if the wires are getting hot and then shorting across each other although that sounds unlikely. If you do decide you can't attempt a repair yourself than it is almost definitely going to be cheaper just to replace it. You gotta figure a repairman is going to spend at least a couple of hours and some parts to fix it and that will add up fast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,425 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I just returned from the garage. While there, I pulled the cover off the compressor's motor. The guts have some surface corrosion (which I expected, as it sat outside for a while before I got it), and while I couldn't conduct a very extensive inspection of the wiring, I didn't see any obvious shorts. I did, however, notice that the oil had a foul, burned odor to it. I'm thinking I definitely need to give it some fresh oil, and should I conduct a thorough wiring inspection while I'm at it?
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top