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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys,
So I'm building together the Iron Man kit and I'm using Green Stuff putty for the seam lines. But the thing is ...how do I know when the seam line is gone? haha. I'm totally new at this. Like I put the green stuff on the seam line and spread it down. I then sanded it down. But at some parts, I could visibly see the seam line, but when I run my finger over it, it feels smooth. So does that mean that I could start painting? Or is the seam line not supposed to be seen at all and be smooth???

So my question is, how do i know when the seam line is "fixed."

Second question is:
Let's say I was working on the arm. And then, to test if I'll be able to see the seam line, and then I spray the primer over the arm to see if the line is still there. If I see that the seam line is still there, I re-apply some more Green Stuff putty, and then paint over and whatever. Is that a good method to see if the line is still there?

Third question:
Also, when applying the Green Stuff putty, am I supposed to just put a goop over and spread it down the line where it wont just go on teh line but on the areas around the line? Or am I suppose to just put a little on and then push it into the seam line only, trying to avoid the surface area around the line as much as possible?? Or is it...just as long as it works..then it works then sand it down?



Thanks for the help
 

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You don't need to glob on a lot of putty. Your only filling a seam. Excess putty means more sanding. I usually apply putty with the back edge of my hobby knife and then spread it on like buttering toast. Sand with some fine grit sandpaper. Prime it and check for flaws. Sand and prime again if needed like Lou said above.
 

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Unfortunately, you don't really KNOW if the seam line is gone until you put a coat of primer over the piece. (This is why puttying can be a ROYAL PAIN IN THE A$$) To make things a little easier and to use less putty, try putting some masking tape on either side of the seam and putty inside. This way, you only get the putty where you want it. Always use thin coats of putty.

I usually use a narrow metal painters pallette knife to apply putty. They are flexible and make it easy to apply. You can pick one up at most craft supply stores.

If you see there is still a seam line after the first application of putty, wait until the primer dries and then reapply the putty. You may have to do this a few times --- but the seam line will go away eventually.


Geminibuildups

www.geminibuildupstudios.com
 

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I've found Mr. Surfacer really helps for those times when you still have a fine seam line after the initial puttying and sanding. It flows well and dries quickly to fill minor seam lines. It is also easily sanded. This link was posted over on SSM today by Rio and explains how it works:
http://www.swannysmodels.com/Surfacer.html

I've also found a way to avoid having to putty much at all at least for long straight seams. Use enough styrene cement so a little bit squishes out along the length of the joint then after it dries run a seam scraper over it several times-it will remove the excess cement and leave a nice smooth joint. With a little practice you may not need to putty at all. The key is getting the cement all along the joint so there are no gaps.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks for the replies guys

So...I should just be seeing like a really thin line of the putty right? Like the putty should strictly be on the seam line right? Not on the actual plastic itself?
 

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pretty much. but don't always go by the seam line you see.

sometimes you are seeing residual seam line. thats why I trust the primer to tell me the truth
 

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A LITTLE either side of the seam is ok, but don't get carried away. if you are dealing with a complex curve on a figure for instance, you'll have a better chance of blending it if you aren't trying to file down a sharp ridge of putty.

That's my 2 cents and it's the one part of kitbuilding I am not fond of either...
 

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Putty

I had a real tough time using putty on IM. I'm starting my second "red plastic" IM, and the idea of using masking tape to minimize overspill sound great.
I like the green stuff, but it dries too fast. If you put it on like wall spackle, trying to smooth as you go, you'll find it will dry on you and crumple/wrinkle up. Is there a way to keep it "juicy" while working with it? Or a way to smooth it like you would smooth wall spackle, with water? What fluid would you use as the "water" diluter medium?
 

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And you do them so well mate :thumbsup:...
I sand a bit before I put my first coat of primer on, I find I can get a lot of the more obvious stuff before I rattle a can that way.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I had a real tough time using putty on IM. I'm starting my second "red plastic" IM, and the idea of using masking tape to minimize overspill sound great.
I like the green stuff, but it dries too fast. If you put it on like wall spackle, trying to smooth as you go, you'll find it will dry on you and crumple/wrinkle up. Is there a way to keep it "juicy" while working with it? Or a way to smooth it like you would smooth wall spackle, with water? What fluid would you use as the "water" diluter medium?

Hey, sorry for the late reply...I was off on a climbing trip for a while and studying.

But with the Green Stuff, I had to CONSTANTLY use just regular tap water on my hands, on the tools, and on the actual putty itself. Like I would dip my finger in water and then dab it onto the putty so that it would not get crumbly. I would only use a small amount of putty at a time and it lasted for about 2 hours.

But I have not been working on this iron man for a while, since I've been gone.
On the side note, I'm still getting those seam lines removed. Some are gone, some are not. I really hate this part. I think its the most annoying part of this thing. haha.
 

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Don't forget -- make sure the parts are lined up perfectly before you cement them together. There's nothing like trying to correct an offset joint with putty. Ick.

This, of course, assumes accurate tooling and no warpage of the parts. (which shouldn't be a problem with Moebius!)
 

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in any case of what putty you use I would tape either side of the seam and fill the seam leave a little space on the surface so the putty can level off when sanding. This way you wont sand away detail while filling gaps.

solex227
 

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Discussion Starter #16
in any case of what putty you use I would tape either side of the seam and fill the seam leave a little space on the surface so the putty can level off when sanding. This way you wont sand away detail while filling gaps.

solex227
hmm...so if I put some putty on the surface though...do you like slice it off after sanding it down then? Or do you just sand it down and that's it..meaning that there will be putty left on the side surface.
 

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Primer paint, sand , repeat til seam is no longer visible.
Or to save on the primer, go buy yourself a silver Sharpie. It reveals the seam line as well as the primer, is cheaper & dries faster. Same deal, if you can see the crack/seam, putty, sand, Sharpie & repeat if necessary.

As for your putty drying out nearly before you lay it down, go to Wal-Mart & in the car section (or close nearby) you'll find Bondo Spot Glazing putty. A red & black tube, it only costs about $4, stays "wet" while working, dries relatively fast, has a fine grit & it's a big enough tube that it'll last you a long time.
 

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Wow I like the sharpie idea PoSII. Thanks for posting, I have been working on the revell mummy and really wanted to make sure I had eliminated the seamlines across the bandages before I went to my first primer coat. This would have helped a lot...
 
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