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i am scratch building a car body out of styrene and resin. i need help with the best way to simulate car doors by scribing lines on body sides.
anybody know a good way of doing this??

thanks!
 

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Howdy John! :wave:

You can find scribing tools at your better Hobby Shops....squadron makes one that I use.

After you practice on spare plastic parts you will get the hang of it. There are a few modelers tricks for hand scribing lines but the best way is to use a tool meant for the job. A good scriber tool 'removes' the plastic as you pull back.....other methods just plow the material to the sides and you do not want that!

Good luck!
 

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You might also look for some of the old labeling tape at your local office supply store. You know, the plastic, old-fashioned type stuff. You can cut it to length, and use it as a guide for your scriber. Helps to ensure straight lines around curves and odd angles.
 

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Good point Mango!

Also this is what I did when I had LOTS of lines to scribe....

Here I am with an OLD Aurora 1/48 scale Chinook helicopter from 1963 or 64 ....anyway....It needed panel lines in a serious way.....lots of work!

SO....to keep my panel lines nice and straight I used some thin sheet aluminum ( you can use a empty DR. PEPPER can or coke ) took about a 3"X3" piece, folded it and used it as a guide!.....that way you can create slight curves that will match your items shape!
 

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I've done my share of scratchbuilding over the years, often a car body surface being in dissimilar materials (styrene & resin, with a bit of putty), and when I do something in that manner, I find scribers don't always work that well to make a consistent panel line.

Quite by accident, I discovered that the simple razor saw blade, if drawn backstroke across the surface, will do so very predictably, and can be used to create a uniformly straight, or even slightly curved panel (or in my case, door, hood or trunk) lines quite easily. I have even gone so far as to take an Xacto razor saw blade, and with my Dremel & a carbide cutter, carved the back edge of the blade into a slight "hook" with just the last few teeth of the sawblade sort of "hanging in midair". I draw the lines on the body shell, and then, finding where those lines cross a convex surface, start the panel line with the saw, on the backstroke, by pushing it backwards until I get the groove (panel line) started, then simply extend that line to its corners, where I work the curved corners carefully with the teeth at the rear tip of the blade. It takes a bit of time, and on occasion a tiny bit of putty to fill any extraneous scratches along the edge of the grooved panel line, but it does work well. Of course, the door line on a 1:25 scale car body is wider and deeper than a panel line on an aircraft, but the technique I use does work.

For small access panels, such as a gas door on the body, I like the dozen or so different PE templates I've picked up over the years, generally I can select a shape from one of these that works, often exactly the shape and dimension I want--for these I use the BMF panel scriber, which also works great.

Art
 

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Any time Pal! :thumbsup:
 
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