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Is there a way that anyone might know of to remove Future floor wax from a model without damaging the acrylic paint that is underneath?
 

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Future is not a wax but rather something more like an acrylic paint. Windex will remove Future, but it will also remove most acrylic paints.

If your model was painted with a solvent based paint like an enamel, a Windex bath would do the trick.
 

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e-rad,

As djnick66 has posted, that which removes Future will also remove acrylic paint. If you're trying to preserve your acrylic appication but want to alter the Future coat - I presume to dull down the shine - you have options. Mixing Future with Tamiya flat base at around a 50-50 ratio will produce a really flat clear finish. Of course, you can dull Future with Testors Dullcote as well.
 

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Is there a way that anyone might know of to remove Future floor wax from a model without damaging the acrylic paint that is underneath?
Future is not a wax but rather something more like an acrylic paint. Windex will remove Future, but it will also remove most acrylic paints.

If your model was painted with a solvent based paint like an enamel, a Windex bath would do the trick.
This is exactly why I never endorse the practice of using it on models. Now do you guys understand?


~ Chris​
 

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This is exactly why I never endorse the practice of using it on models. Now do you guys understand?


~ Chris​
No its not a rational argument. You can't easily remove Testors clear flat or gloss lacquer, Tamiya X-22 gloss, Gunze Mr. Top Coat, etc. either. And, actually, if the model had been painted with an enamel or lacquer paint, removing Future is quite simple and easy.
 

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Future is acrylic. If you use it over acrylic paint and try and strip it you are going to effect your acrylic color coat. If you use a lacquer clear over a lacquer color coat and try and strip it, your'e going to remove the color coat, etc... It's best to use a different paint for your clear than you used for your color coat, that way you can strip your clear without stripping your color coat. It has nothing to do with there being anything wrong with Future
 

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To the OP, can you give us more detail on why you need to remove the Future? There may be another, easier solution to your problem.
 

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Dio,

I understand that you don't like it. I do, and so I use it. Occasional problems will crop up with any modeling material.
I understand, but why make it more difficult than you have to? Using a product that isn't designed for a particular use is only inviting trouble.

~ Chris​
 

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I understand, but why make it more difficult than you have to? Using a product that isn't designed for a particular use is only inviting trouble.

~ Chris​
Well its formulation is really not much different than Tamiya clear gloss. Windex will remove that too (but will also remove acrylic paint). The problem isn't in Future itself, which is pretty inert, but in what paint you use underneath. IF the model had been painted with an enamel paint you could strip the Future off with a spritz of Windex.

Assuming he did not use Future, tell me what model product he could apply over acrylic paint that he could wash off?
 

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From Wikipedia: "Psychologist Karl Duncker defined functional fixedness as being a "mental block against using an object in a new way that is required to solve a problem."" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Functional_fixedness

The usual example is the refusal to use a dime to turn a screw when a screwdriver is not available.

Maybe the makers of Future chose to use clear acrylic in a new way: as a finish for floors. If that were true, then we may be using the product for its original purpose ... just in a new packaging. At any rate, it works as an acrylic clearcoat.
 

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whats interesting is that AFAIK "Future" as a modeling product is a fairly recent phenomenon or fad. But I found some references to using it as a clear gloss "paint" back in late 70s or early 80s model magazines like the now defunct Scale Modeler or Military Modeler.
 

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From Wikipedia: "Psychologist Karl Duncker defined functional fixedness as being a "mental block against using an object in a new way that is required to solve a problem."" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Functional_fixedness

The usual example is the refusal to use a dime to turn a screw when a screwdriver is not available.

Maybe the makers of Future chose to use clear acrylic in a new way: as a finish for floors. If that were true, then we may be using the product for its original purpose ... just in a new packaging. At any rate, it works as an acrylic clearcoat.
I understand what you guys are saying, but this scenario doesn't apply here. There are times when you can substitute one thing for another, but this isn't like using a dime instead of a flat tip screw driver! Chemical formulation isn't like turning on a lightswitch! You have to be very careful as not all modeling products are compatible with each other, neither is the use of everyday household products no matter how hard you try to justify it! Now if Future decided to formulate a clear coat for models, we would never have this discussion again. But seeing as more people clean, and polish their floors, and there's a bigger market for it than there is for clear coat that is safe to use on plastic models, I don't see that happening any time soon! Unless somehow everyone in the world got sick of videogames then decided that self entertainment was the key to enlightenment, then I would say otherwise.

This is why I only use automotive acrylic on my models, so that I can paint them without damaging them, and so that I know the paint will be durable enough to wetsand, then rub out without burning through it. I understand that you can't use gloss on all models, especially FLAT coloured military models, but there ARE companies that make "Ultraflat" clear coat in a polyurethane formulation to avoid paint incompatibility.

~ Chris​
 

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Now if Future decided to formulate a clear coat for models, we would never have this discussion again. But seeing as more people clean, and polish their floors, and there's a bigger market for it than there is for clear coat that is safe to use on plastic models, I don't see that happening any time soon! .

This is why I only use automotive acrylic on my models, so that I can paint them without damaging them

~ Chris​
This is not a compatability issue. Going by your first stComatement here, how could Future reformulate itself to be more like, say, Tamiya X22 clear gloss? If the modeler who asked the original question had put x22 on top of an acrylic paint job, he still would not be able to strip it off. Nor could he remove Testors Acryl clear flat, Testors Clear Flat Lacquer etc.

Compatability doesn't mean "reversible". Im not sure you can remove polyurathane off of a model very easily without damaging the original paint either.
 

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You only use "automotive acrylic" paints on your models? Doesn't that go against your stance on if it's not formulated for model use, don't use it? Automotive acrylics were designed for autos not model cars, you should not use them then.:rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I Goofed!!

To the OP, can you give us more detail on why you need to remove the Future? There may be another, easier solution to your problem.
I was trying to do pantyhose with a mix of brown artist ink and future. My airbrush went haywire and it sprayed on way to heavy. But the paint on the legs was perfect. I did not want to screw that up so I was trying to see if there was a way to strip the future without screwing up the paint. Unfortunately the paint was acrylic also. But I have it fixed now after four flippin' trips to the strip bucket!! :drunk:
 

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You only use "automotive acrylic" paints on your models? Doesn't that go against your stance on if it's not formulated for model use, don't use it? Automotive acrylics were designed for autos not model cars, you should not use them then.:rolleyes:
This is not a compatability issue. Going by your first stComatement here, how could Future reformulate itself to be more like, say, Tamiya X22 clear gloss? If the modeler who asked the original question had put x22 on top of an acrylic paint job, he still would not be able to strip it off. Nor could he remove Testors Acryl clear flat, Testors Clear Flat Lacquer etc.

Compatability doesn't mean "reversible". Im not sure you can remove polyurathane off of a model very easily without damaging the original paint either.
I'll answer both of these questons with this single post. Paint compatibility ensures that your models won't melt surface-wise with subsequent layers of paint if they are COMPATIBLE. Meaning that you wouldn't use lacquer over enamel, or over acrylic. It's too hot, and it will wrinkle the finish.

Robert: Automotive finishes are PAINT - not a POLISH meant for floors. The paint is formulated for be just that - paint! Not meant to be cross referenced with other types of chemicals that are not meant for painting surfaces. FUTURE has chemicals in it that allow it to dry, but just because of that it doesn't mean that it's safe to put on top of any old thing. :freak: It also has other chemicals in it that AREN'T in paint! These things don't "flash off", or dry out of the surface completely to provide a polishable surface not intended to be sprayed without a rubbing action to provide a highly reflective surface on floors. You can't call something a polish if the surface doesn't dry because it will leave prints, or patterns where something has rubbed against it. I don't understand why all the indignant comments defending the use of Future, when it's obvious that not everyone has, or will have the same results that you've had using it for an unintended purpose. This also creates a conflict of interest between users of actual paint, and those who use whatever so, and so uses just because they read in a magazine, or website. Meaning that not everyone is going to agree, but the bottom line is: if you're going to use something that isn't intended for the purpose YOU intend to use it for - don't be surprised when catastrophy strikes!!

~ Chris​
 
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