Hobbyist Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
just wondering if there is an easy way to remove the paint from a diecast car so that just the raw metal underneath is left.
(i want to try repainting some cheap HW's)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,345 Posts
Borrowed from the FAQ section on HWC.com:

You are going to find that there are about as many ways to strip paint as there are people customizing cars. Usually each individual has their own favorite, but you will often find the only difference is brand name. I will share a few of the techniques that I have used over the years.

Rule #1: Remember that no matter what you use to strip paint, other than mechanical methods, you are going to be working with chemicals and you have to keep safety in mind. Many of the strippers are flammable, some are toxic to inhale and most will burn your skin. PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW THE LABEL DIRECTIONS!

There are two basic types of paint strippers, solvents or caustics. The caustics are lye based and are generally used to strip paint from wood. The solvent strippers range from some of the "green" ones based on the chemicals in citrus (oranges) to the most aggressive, usually containing methylene chloride. Methylene Chloride will burn skin almost instantly. You must wear eye protection, have adequate ventilation and wear protective clothing when using MC strippers

My personal experience has been that, although maybe not as fast, automotive brake fluid is one of the safest strippers. Not only is it less likely to harm skin, it won't hurt most plastics. Model railroaders have used it for years to remove the paint and tampos from rolling stock. Just be sure to thoroughly wash the stripped casting before repainting.

Although I have available about every brand of stripper, including the commercial ones used by aircraft refinishers, 90% of the time I use acetone. It can be found with the paint thinners at any paint store or with the paint products at Wal-Mart, Home Depot, etc. Although flammable and the concentrated vapors can be toxic, it is safer than most of the commercial strippers. I keep it in a glass jar with a metal screw top. I use glass and metal because acetone will dissolve some plastics and tends to evaporate through the plastics it doesn't dissolve. I have a peanut butter size glass jar to which I have attached a safety label. Even though you know what is in the jar, others in your family may not. NEVER, and I mean NEVER put hazardous chemicals into any type of food container!

I just toss the disassembled metal parts in the jar and let them soak. The paint will usually slough off in a few minutes. You can snake the casting out of the jar using a wire hook or pick it out with tweezers or forceps. Light brushing with an old toothbrush will usually remove any stubborn spots. I use a wooden toothpick to get any remaining paint out of door and hood lines. If the paint is stubborn, you can just keep repeating the soaking. One advantage of acetone is that it completely evaporates and won't leave any residue to interfere with repainting. The primary problem with acetone and skin is that it removes the natural oils. Just avoid skin contact as much as possible. Remember also to keep acetone away from windshields and other plastic parts.

The strippers with methylene chloride and other strong solvents will strip faster and strip multiple layers, but are also much more quickly damaging to eyes and skin. I can't emphasize too much that they must be used outdoors or with adequate ventilation, eye protection must be employed and gloves should be used. Follow the label directions. Not only will most of the methylene chloride strippers fog windshields, like acetone, they will often completely dissolve some plastic parts. If in doubt on plastic, use brake fluid.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,866 Posts
HWC.com??? HWC.com Come one what about www.hotworldcustoms.com that is where the custom information is. HWC.com WISHES they had the information of that site - literally.

LOL!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
paulel said:
just wondering if there is an easy way to remove the paint from a diecast car so that just the raw metal underneath is left.
(i want to try repainting some cheap HW's)
THIS IS THE METHOD I USE WORKS FOR ME OVERNIGHT.JUST POP YOUR HOT WHEEL IN A CUP OF PINE-SOL OVERNIGHT AND THEN IT JUST COMES RIGHT OFF IN THE MORNING.HARD TAMPOS MAY NEED A LITTLE ENCOURAGING WITH A TOOTHBRUSH.THIS IS MY RESULT:

http://www.hobbytalk.com/bbs1/showthread.php?t=88198

HOPE THIS HELPS,
LOUIE :wave:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,477 Posts
i use a carburator cleaner from napa auto parts,,,,,,,,of course nothing plastic lives in it at all,,,,,,,,,but it only takes about 3 minutes in it to strip paint from any diecast clean to the metal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
886 Posts
Being a mechanic myself, I use heavy duty carburetor cleaner(I have some in my garage). It works in minutes and strips the casting completely. I attatch a small length of wire to the part and dip it in the cleaner to soak. I rinse the casting under running water for a minute or so after stripping the casting to remove any cleaner residue. I have heard oven cleaner also works and yes, brake fluid does take paint off of metal, but it takes a little while to react. :wave:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,668 Posts
dipstick said:
HWC.com??? HWC.com Come one what about www.hotworldcustoms.com
And I quote:

"Carburetor Cleaning Products - Chem-Dip is another great product. Designed to get the "gook" and "gunk" out of that dirty carburetor, it is a very potent cleaner. New to the Hobbyist is comes in a Gallon can and includes a parts basket for immersing your bodies and parts. This basket is large enough for a number of piece to be stripped at once and is a great benefit over feeling around in the can with your gloved hand trying to get every piece out. Chem-Dip works very quickly - average body can be done in a matter of minutes in a lot of cases, however extended periods can minimize the amount of wire brush clean-up later."

I use Chem-Dip and it works rather well. Strips cars in less than half an hour. Warning, it is very powerful, and should be used only in ventilated areas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Fat Louie:
i tried your Pine-Sol suggestion. i soaked the body for about 12 hours actually. a toothbrush still wouldn't remove the paint. i was able to remove some by scraping with my fingernail.
is there a certain type of Pine-Sol i should use?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,548 Posts
Jasco paint stripper and 35 seconds.
....or simply toss into a jar of MEK solvent,then lightly scrub with a stiff plastic,or brass bristle brush.
all these items can be found at your local paint stores. :thumbsup:
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top