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Discussion Starter #1
"Removing Paint From Aerosol Cans To Use In Your AirBrush"

A great primer is Gray Equipment #20010 by Painters Place in the 11oz. aerosol can for 90cents at WalMart in the HousePaint aisle.
Several years ago I invented a way to remove aerosol paint from its container and Scale Model Magazine ran it in their magazine.

Simply remove the Gray Primer from the can and thin it 35% with Paint Thinner.
It will go on thin and smooth unlike the gritty, sandy effects you get from spraying it out of the aerosol can.
It's adhesive properties are superior.
Aerosol primers whether Enamel or Lacquer are way too thick and gritty for our 1/64 scale Customs.
When thinned they lay down smooth and of nominal thickness.

Here's a trick I came up with to transfer paint from the aerosol can to a container so I could spray it with my Airbrush.
Scale Model Magazine saw it online, contacted me and requested to publish it.

You will need a 3" - 4" length of plastic drinking straw, some 1" wide tape, and of course a suitable container.
I collect the empty film cans from local WalMart Photoshops. This soft pliable plastic will not react with automotive paints.



1st-----Butt the straw up to the hole in the button of the Aerosol can. In most cases with Duplicolor, the straw will actually slip over a short protrusion in the button.


2nd-----Wrap the tape around the straw and button so they are held together firmly and tightly.


3rd-----Just spray your paint into whatever container you've chosen. The straw will perform like a muffler, choking down the escaping gases and allowing the paint to gently run out the end of the straw.


If you're only using small amounts of paint, you can just spray the paint directly into your paint cup.

I will add this note here although I haven't included it before for this post.
I have an alternate method for removing the paint from aerosol cans when I want to completely empty the can and transfer all its contents to another container.
You can of course use my above method to completely empty an Aerosol can but this second method is quicker.

Remove the spray button from the can.
Shake the can to thoroughly mix its contents.
Set the can down on a flat surface.
Using a file sharpen a small nail to a point and with a small hammer gently tap a pin hole just inside the lip at the top of the can.
A pinhole is all you need.
Just barely break the skin of the can.
Allow the pressure to fully escape, about 15 minutes.
Now similarly tap another pinhole opposite from the first on the other side of where the spray button was.
When all pressure has escaped enlarge both holes with a larger nail or phillips screwdriver.
These two holes will equalize the air pressure in the can so you may pour out the contents.

Now you need a suitable container to hold the contents.
You may use any soft plastic container i.e., polyethylene not hard styrene.
I choose either Ketchup bottles or Barbecue Sauce bottles.
Yeah, I do a lot of Barbecuing around here.
These bottles are constructed of soft vinyl like plastic which will not react with the chemicals in Enamel or Lacquer paints.
They also come with the benefit of having a small mouth opening so you may safely pour your thinned paint directly into your AirBrush Cup.

Gently pour the contents of the can into your new container and leave it open for about 4 hours.
Return every so often to swirl around the contents assuring that the gases get released.
The paint still contains propellant in liquid form and will create pressure in your new container if shaken.
Diluting it with the prescribed amount, 35%, of Paint Thinner will deactivate some of this tendency to bubble up and boil over.
I screw on the cap, gently shake the bottle and very easily loosen the cap 4 or 5 times repeatedly to allow all remaining propellant to escape.

So here you have methods of removing paint from aerosol cans allowing you to either release small amounts as in using the Straw Method or to completely empty the can and transfer the contents to another container.

All my painting is done completely with House Of Kolor products, Of Course!!

But I like to give alternate methods so that anyone can get perfect results using products they can easily obtain.

--CadillacPat the UnCustomizer--


 

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i might add as a per caution wear glasses when puncturing the can... always be safe
think safety first.
 

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I really like idea #1, it's something I can safely do. Now, idea #2, well, I can just see me getting paint squirted all over myself and my surroundings making that 1st pin hole. I gotta go find my straws now. BTW, thanks for the tip.
 

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Good tips as usual Pat! I love this forum!
As an alternative to punching a hole in the aerosol can first, why not try this. We all know, or should know, about how to clear the nozzle of aerosol paint cans. You just turn the can upside down until only the propellant comes out with no paint. Just do that until all of the propellant is gone or nearly gone, then poke the hole in the can.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That's a good suggestion Bud,
I've never tried it that way, I just go ahead and make a tiny hole after shaking the can.

I'll try that out the next time I take the paint out of a full can.

--CadillacPat the UnCustomizer--
 

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Thanks Pat!!! I just got my first airbrush and was looking for ideas for inexpensive paints to use with it. Me and a fellow slot head were just discussing this this past week so the timing couldn't be better. I really like the straw method, but the empty entire contents method seems like a good option too. Must go to Micky D's for straws... and maybe a happy meal...:lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Pat!!! I just got my first airbrush and was looking for ideas for inexpensive paints to use with it. Me and a fellow slot head were just discussing this this past week so the timing couldn't be better. I really like the straw method, but the empty entire contents method seems like a good option too. Must go to Micky D's for straws... and maybe a happy meal...:lol:
Thanks SlotCarMan,
Let's give this a boost up front to go along with the AirBrush and Paint threads!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

--CadillacPat the UnCustomizer--
Keeping the ZING in CustomiZING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

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The plastic film cans are just about the best containers I've used to date. They seal up and hold the paint in good condition really longer than a Testor bottle.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I started out collecting 35mm film cans to mix my paints in and they work fine, for mixing.
I think I have a very early How-To about them way back here somewhere.
I went around to all the Walmarts and Sam's Photo Booths and put together a box full of over 10,000 of these little poly vinyl containers back before everything went digital and before I discovered clear Medical Cups.

I would strongly recommend not attempting to store mixed paints in these film cans for more than 24 hrs as their snap on caps aren't airtight and don't make near as good a seal as glass or plastic bottles with twist on caps.
Been there done that.
Now if you're just mixing 1/8 or so of an oz. of paint, enough for one good coat on a casting, it doesn't really matter if it dries up on you because it's not a big cost.
If it's a small one shot mix then no big deal, but if you're mixing up colors to use later then by all means get airtight bottles with twist on caps.

The drawback of the film cans is only some of them are translucent allowing you to see true color when you mix paint.
Most are black which also hinders exact measurement of fluids.

The plus side is they were FREE and won't react to any kind of chemicals you use like Lacquer Thinner, Paint Thinner or Automotive products.

Here's what I use today,
Medical Cups from any local Medical Supply,


These allow you to mix very minute but exact compositions in a variety of increments.

I'l take some pics and show how I store my mixed Primers and ready to shoot base colors.


--CadillacPat the UnCustomizer--
Keeping the ZING in CustomiZING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


 

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Giving this da bump!!

I just finally started tapping a few cans for use in my air brush (NO, I haven't tried it yet) and I wish I was able to find this thread again before I started.. I remembered the straw part and that went rather well. I knew there was liquid propellant still mixed in with the paint, but had no idea it was so powerful!!! :eek: After sitting for about an hour, I took one of my bottles, put the cap over the top, and gave it a gentle swirl...

BAD IDEA!!!!!!!

I now have lovely green tinted fingernails on my right hand, A custom spattered tank top/ short set, and lost a little candy green paint all over my bench!!! :lol: It figures now that it's all said and done, I located this thread again!!!

I really wanted to drain the paint off before I started so I had a place to put any excess. Being a first timer with a brush, I have no clue how much paint I'll need for a project, and since I suffer from muscle spasms I really don't trust myself with the paint cup. I don't know if spraying directly from the can to the glass siphon cup with the propellant still in the paint would have negative effects when I try to cap it and spray. Four months of feet dragging was enough for me!! Time to start painting a better way!!!:thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I just finally started tapping a few cans for use in my air brush (NO, I haven't tried it yet) and I wish I was able to find this thread again before I started.. I remembered the straw part and that went rather well. I knew there was liquid propellant still mixed in with the paint, but had no idea it was so powerful!!! :eek: After sitting for about an hour, I took one of my bottles, put the cap over the top, and gave it a gentle swirl...

Hey SlotCarMan,
Yes, too bad you couldn't find this thread again before you shook that bottle up.

After transferring Aerosol Paints from the can to another container I always let the container sit open for several hours.
Then everytime thereafter I open the new container I just very easily back off on the cap to allow any remaining propellant to slowly escape.
After a few openings and uses this stored pressure becomes less and less present.
It only takes one time of making a mess to cause you to remember this.

Finding these Tutorials that have slipped into back pages is fairly easy using the Search feature and key words.
If you know the person's name who wrote the Tutorial it's even easier using Advanced Search.


QUOTE, SlotCarMan,
I really wanted to drain the paint off before I started so I had a place to put any excess. Being a first timer with a brush, I have no clue how much paint I'll need for a project, and since I suffer from muscle spasms I really don't trust myself with the paint cup. I don't know if spraying directly from the can to the glass siphon cup with the propellant still in the paint would have negative effects when I try to cap it and spray.

Once you get in the rhythm of AirBrushing and mixing your own paints you quickly become aware of just how small an amount of paint is needed for a ColorCoat on these 1/64 scale bodies.
I keep a bottle of mixed ready to use Primer, about 16ozs., and pour my 1/4oz. Paint Cup about 2/3 full.
This does the job of Priming.

For my ColorCoats I never mix more than 1/4 oz and sometimes only 1/8oz.

For ClearCoats I usually wait and Clear several pieces at one time but each piece requires less than 1/4oz. which is the size of a standard Paint Cup on many AirBrushes.
Some HotWheels bodies require only half the 1/4oz. amount.

It quickly becomes obvious how cost efficient AirBrushing is, allowing you to use the best available paint products for only pennies a Custom.

Using House Of Kolor products and shooting multi layered paintjobs, 5 to 9 coats, my final cost from Primer through 2 coats of Clear, including all Reducers (Thinners) and Catalysts (Hardeners) averages $1 a Custom.

In answer to your thoughts on spraying Aerosol Paint directly into a Siphon Glass Jar,
Same procedure I've listed above,
If you're going to shake the container once the cap is screwed back on then gently unscrew the cap and allow the expanded gases to escape.
Now knowing you only need to place a very small amount of paint in your Cup or Jar, chances of a mishap are highly unlikely.

Good Luck SlotCarman,
If you have any more questions just ask!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

--CadillacPat the UnCustomizer--
Keeping the ZING in CustomiZING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks Pat!!! I just got my first airbrush and was looking for ideas for inexpensive paints to use with it. Me and a fellow slot head were just discussing this this past week so the timing couldn't be better. I really like the straw method, but the empty entire contents method seems like a good option too. Must go to Micky D's for straws... and maybe a happy meal...:lol:
Thanks SlotCarMan,
If you want some very inexpensive paints for using in your AirBrush, just look at all the $1 a can Aerosol Sprays in the House Paint Department at WalMart.
$1 a can for 10 or 11ozs is very inexpensive yet most of these paints are decent.
I used these very same paints for 2 years when I began AirBrushing.

On the same shelves are Aerosol Sprays for $2 - $4 which is still very cheap considering you get 10ozs.

Painters Place brand has the Grey Equipoment Primer #20010 that I have mentioned and also a Clear Gloss #20014 whic works fine.
These are all Enamels so they are compatible.

For slightly more $4 - $5 a can you can get Duplicolor Aerosol Automotive paint in the WalMart Auto Dept or any AutoZone.

HobbyLobby has a huge variety of Aerosol Paints which will work well in your AirBrush although they may have to be thinned a little accordingly.

Even Testors, Boyd, and ModelMaster are not too expensive at 3oz for $4.

Just stay away from cheap waterbased craft paints like AppleBarrel.
They're just cheap and that's it, they're just cheap.
They are not designed for our Hobby and will give you problems resulting in nothing but frustration.

If you have any questions on thinning these Aerosol Paints just ask.

--CadillacPat the UnCustomizer--
Keeping the ZING in CustomiZING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 
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