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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all-

I have been looking on ebay for a redline VW bug and came across several great carded redlines of different models. Almost every redline I have ever come across in person has bent in wheels, and I just thought that came with play wear. But upon closer examination, the cars inside the original cards and still sealed seem to be developing the same wheel bend (where the bottom of the wheels are bent at the axles toward the inside of the car), but have obviously never been played with. What causes the wheels to bend?

-Matt
 

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I think part of the reason the axles bend is that the axles are realy extra thin.
The thinner the axle, the less resistance there is, the faster it'll go. I think that was their reasoning.
Don't really know what excatly bent the axles other than maybe how they're mounted maybe.

I remeber the Hot Wheels I got new back in '68 and '69 rolled fast, but never straight!

But fast isn't realy that fast with crooked axles on the track.
Banging side to side on the side rails of the track slows the car down a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Awesome, I appreciate the informative response. :) I get the logic behind the thin axles, but it does seem like they'd bend after little amounts of play and make it difficult for kids to play with them on a track and make them go as fast as they'd probably like, like you said. From what I have seen they started thickening the axles in the late 70's, right?
 

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You're very welcome!

Well, I don't have many HWs past the first generation Redlines, but you may be right about the axles being thicker, I think you are correct.

I'm much more knowlagable on Lesney Superfast (and older).
Old first generation Superfast might have had slightly thicker axles and a different mounting/suspension system.
The suspension was very good, and the early Superfast almost always went straight as an arrow!

Sometime in the mid to late '70s, both brands lost their suspension in most cars sadly. Probably to cut costs...of course. :rolleyes:
I'm sure there are guys here that have taken apart old HWs and made a study of them more than I have.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Awesome, hopefully if they're here they'll speak up soon haha. I'd love to see pics of your collection of RL's, do you have any available?
 

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I do have a few in my cases. I'll dig'em out sometime.
I just have to get some new rechargable batteries for my camera.
 

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Was just re-reading a book I aquired a while back called " Hot Wheels: 35 years of Speed, Power, Performance and Attitude" by Randy Leffingwell

Very cool read... lots about the incarnation of Hot Wheels....

I BELIEVE that the wheels looking almost bent like that was done on purpose.
There were alot of very extensive tests done on the original Hot Wheels and could swear I read that they did the pre-bending so they would do better on the tracks sets... especially thru the loops
 

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Pablo i have the same book and i agree, the thinner axles also came from the fact that the wire they used came from "piano string" cheap easy to work with and they found a ton of it somewhere to use for the first redlines. Also the reasoning behind changing the rear boarded beach bomb to side boards was so it would work with the accelerators and track sets. I think original redlines are WAAAAAAAAAAAAAY faster than newer hotwheels, there are a few exceptions but i had one beater redline that was really really fast on the gravity track. i think the reason they have moved to thicker axles now is just for the fact that yeah the piano wire made for almost soft suspension but it also bent super easily.
 

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Hey all-

I have been looking on ebay for a redline VW bug and came across several great carded redlines of different models. Almost every redline I have ever come across in person has bent in wheels, and I just thought that came with play wear. But upon closer examination, the cars inside the original cards and still sealed seem to be developing the same wheel bend (where the bottom of the wheels are bent at the axles toward the inside of the car), but have obviously never been played with. What causes the wheels to bend?

-Matt

Somebody (re-issue) make a small axel tune up wrench to fix bend axel problem if car is opened not in package - a couple of people who sell reproduction parts online have these and they work great. Try HotWheels redline discussion boards and they will help. like this picture on eBay:

http://compare.ebay.com/like/120894982157?var=lv&ltyp=AllFixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar

also Hong Kong made redlines have less of this problem than do US redlines.
 

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I would approach these with some measure of suspicion. Some of my cars just didn't make it, but I've still got my Deora, Cougar, and the Boss Hoss I had to send in for. The Deora and Cougar have some serious rash but otherwise fairly good. The Boss Hoss I kept put up. The set up on these originals was intended to effect a working suspension and the wheels would spring. It was cool to put just a little down force onto them and roll them slowly along and watch the wheels move up and down over the rough spots on the floor. Looked just like a real car going over the bumps. These were the ones with the white axle bearing insert. Anyway, I also remember the suspension being fairly durable. About the only time I bent an axle was when I dropped one and it landed on the wheels, or when one got stepped on, or a nasty T-bone on a wheel. While I'm no authority on the topic, I do have some idea of what it took to tear up some first gen's. I know they changed the wheel design later on to something without the bearing inserts and I can't speak about any experience with those, as apparently that's about the time I wandered away from Hot Wheeling. That said, if the subject is a 1st generation, I would think the package has to take a pretty hard wack to bend the axles. Enough to put a crumple the card or crack the shell. I'm not saying it can't be done, but it would be a little suspicious to me. Looking at the Boss, I see I've got one rear wheel that's not quite straight. It did see a little "road" time but I don't remember being that hard on it, so maybe it can happen. Something with all four wheels folded up just seems not right though. Don't let me talk you out of something you want. Just offering some insight from a guy that was there.
 

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Pablo i have the same book and i agree, the thinner axles also came from the fact that the wire they used came from "piano string" cheap easy to work with and they found a ton of it somewhere to use for the first redlines. Also the reasoning behind changing the rear boarded beach bomb to side boards was so it would work with the accelerators and track sets. I think original redlines are WAAAAAAAAAAAAAY faster than newer hotwheels, there are a few exceptions but i had one beater redline that was really really fast on the gravity track. i think the reason they have moved to thicker axles now is just for the fact that yeah the piano wire made for almost soft suspension but it also bent super easily.
Please come to Niles MI/South Bend IN (It is practically on the state line) to Retro Fest and run your newer and older cars on the tracks! We have had several classes and tracks to run on and have a real blast with all of the diecast and friends. I'd bet there might be some mention of dates in the near future!:wave: Keep your eyes open on the shows board
 
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