Hobbyist Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone,

This is my first post on here. I'm getting back into plastic model building after about a 10-year hiatus. Starting out with a Revell/Monogram '32 Ford 3-window Coupe that I found in the storage closet and will go from there.

The question I have is about Revell #7222, 1977 GMC Pickup With Snowplow that may be a re-issue of an old kit.

The box photos have the finished model painted in a color that looks like Hugger Orange. Out of curiousity, I went to the HS to see what options existed there, and I found rattlecans of either Testors or Model Master in that color, and the can said it was part of a 2-step system, with a base coat of color to be followed by a clearcoat. IIRC, there were both gloss and matte clearcoats in that brand of paint.

My question stems from not wanting to build a brand-new looking truck. I went through Decatur, IL a couple of weeks ago, and saw similar trucks out on the road doing snow removal. They were older and weathered-looking, with rustout in several places. I would like to build a model in that spirit.

Hugger orange seems like a good color for a municipal snowplow, but what's the best way to keep the color without it being artificially glossy? Is it as simple as spraying matte clearcoat instead of gloss? I've seen several good ways to make a model look rusty, so that's not a huge issue right now.

Sorry if this seems like a n00b question, but since I haven't done this in a long time, maybe that's what I am. Tempted to buy two kits and maybe build one nice and new and the other old and weathered.

This may be an ambitious project for a n00b, but I see it as a challenge. Any suggestions would be appreciated, as well as ideas from someone who's built this kit.

Thank you,
-William
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
There may be several ways to accomplish this. Dullcoat would dull it down from the high gloss. Also you could achieve the same effect, by wetsanding your final coat of paint if it is too glossy as well, before using the dullcoat. This way it looks as if it had been out in the sun and faded over time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
Something else you may try too is to spray or brush on some rust colored Testors in areas that you are going to show rust or rot on the truck. Then paint the vehicle in your desired color. Then sand the body lightly with some well worn wet or dry, harder in the areas are with the rust color. When your done the rust will show peaking threw the top color.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Something else you may try too is to spray or brush on some rust colored Testors in areas that you are going to show rust or rot on the truck. Then paint the vehicle in your desired color. Then sand the body lightly with some well worn wet or dry, harder in the areas are with the rust color. When your done the rust will show peaking threw the top color.
That is a very good tip!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
That is a very good tip!!
Thank you, I used to do that a lot when I was still building models. I used to like to build old broken down cars and that was one of the techniques I used. I hope this helps with his build of his truck and..................post up pics of it when you finish it !!! LOL
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top