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Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to order some Alclad for various things, including some Real Space as well as Fake Space kits. I'm wondering what the 1950's metallic ICBMs would be done in: chrome, or some type of aluminum? This question is specific to Alclad paints, so it may come down to Chrome, Aluminum, or Duraluminum.

Thanks in advance for your advice.
 

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Oxidation Genius
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Well, they certainly weren't chrome. If they weren't painted white, they were bare metal. Whether it was aluminum or duralumin, I can't say for sure.


 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, I settled on Aluminum. I have an order of several Alclads, plus cleaner and the primer, and what the heck, I pre ordered a CC Mercury kit as well, from Squadron (after fighting with their sucky search and order system, just had to add that :)).
 

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You could vary the paint to create the paneling effect visible in the excellent photos above with two different metallic paints.
 

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Terryr, some rockets had a black and white checkerboard pattern. I guess that is a proto-aztec pattern. Dunno why.

Luckily I am among friends who will not laugh at me when I say that seeing this on BW TV as a young'un led me to think Ralston was involved somehow...

Those two pics need to be captioned but the best I can do is for the top one... "We're testing really bad places to stand during liftoff!"
 

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Roll patterns - painted on so that it's easier to tell the orientation of the rocket when tracked with long-range cameras.
 

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Rocketry

ChrisDoll said:
Roll patterns - painted on so that it's easier to tell the orientation of the rocket when tracked with long-range cameras.
The German scientists used those patterns on the V2s and then brought that idea to America during their ballistic missile work. It carried through the space program.
 

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So... you're saying... Ralston had *nothing* to do with it, and you expect me to believe that? Seems to me all those rockets used to take off around breakfast time...

Here's a deep down memory... I used to get up way before the grups and watch TV, in the hopes that they'd fire off a rocket. I saw a lot more Jack LaLanne than Nasa, though. I remember very little of what I watched... I remember the news announcement that Stan Laurel died, I remember Col. Sanders making his chicken on TV (the secret recipe went in during the commercial, IIRC, darn it!). I remember Kukla Fran and Ollie showing a movie about a boy with green hair, which lacked impact for me as I was watching in BW. But the only rocket I recall watching was a spacewalk flight, and the tech of the time was so crude the network coverage consisted largely of a string puppet of an astronaut in a suit. The puppeteer tried to mimic what the astronaut was doing, since there was no TV cam on the flight. Any idea which flight this was? I'm trying to track down my earliest dateable memory...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
"Happily we exercise, exercise, exercise!" :). And Jack Lalane is STILL alive :). [And don't forget having to wait for those old tube TVs to "warm up" before you could watch them ]

The movie, The Boy with the Green Hair, was reportedly some sort of anti-war movie, but I never got it either. The "boy" was Billy Mummy, aka. Will Robinson from Lost In Space and the personal assistant to Delane (sp?) in Babylon 5.

If it was a spacewalk, I would imagine it had to be one of the Gemini flights?

I'm looking for a small Gemini kit. I want to scratchbuild Blofelds secret rocket from _You_Only_Live_Twice_. The Blofeld rocket would be a pretty easy scracthbuild, but I need a small Gemini, preferably one that's in scale with some version of the Apollo LEM stage, which I could use for the front part of Blofelds rocket :).
 

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Oxidation Genius
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Delenn.

Revell made a 1/48 Mercury/Gemini 2-pack back in the day. Itwas recently reissued a few years ago. You might be able to find it somewhere.
 

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Otto69 said:
"Happily we exercise, exercise, exercise!" :). And Jack Lalane is STILL alive :). [And don't forget having to wait for those old tube TVs to "warm up" before you could watch them ]

The movie, The Boy with the Green Hair, was reportedly some sort of anti-war movie, but I never got it either. The "boy" was Billy Mummy, aka. Will Robinson from Lost In Space and the personal assistant to Delane (sp?) in Babylon 5.
Actually, it was "Quantum Leaps" Dean Stockwell, I don't think Mumy was born when "Green Hair" came out.

And it was an anti-war movie. Mumy's antiwar movie/parable was "Bless the Beast and Children".

Both are pretty ridiculously dated today.
 

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Pygar said:
Here's a deep down memory... I recall watching a spacewalk flight, and the tech of the time was so crude the network coverage consisted largely of a string puppet of an astronaut in a suit. The puppeteer tried to mimic what the astronaut was doing, since there was no TV cam on the flight. Any idea which flight this was? I'm trying to track down my earliest dateable memory...
You were watching NBC and it was in the summer of 1966. I'll have to check, but it was probably Gemini 9 or Gemini 10. I remember that flight because I was watching it over at a friend's house (he had a COLOR television!) and the only reason I'd be there in the middle of the day is because it was summer vacation.

- Jack

Jack Hagerty
ARA Press
www.arapress.com
 

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John P said:
Well, they certainly weren't chrome. If they weren't painted white, they were bare metal. Whether it was aluminum or duralumin, I can't say for sure.
The images you showed are of a Mercury-Atlas. The Atlas was made from very thin stainless steel sheet (the differences in texture you see are the "grain" in the metal from the individual sheets). It was unusual in that it was a "balloon tank" vehicle, e.g. there was no internal structure under the skin. The skin was the tank wall with only bulkheads to separate the propellants. It had to be kept pressurized when not fueled because it could not even support its own weight when empty (I have some video of an Atlas/Agena at Vandenberg folding up like cardboard during a fueling mishap).

Most rockets of the period were aluminum skin over a frame. Usually the skin was painted (Thor, Jupiter, etc.) but sometimes not (Titan).

You also have to decide what point in the flight you want to model. The Atlas, for example, looks all shiny when first set up on the pad, but after fueling and through launch, it's all white on the top two thirds from the frost around the LOX tank. You also, obviously, can't see the "UNITED STATES" running down the side under the frost. The Titans, conversely, use "room temperature" propellants (hydrazine and nitric acid) so even though they're unpainted, they look the same all the time.

- Jack

Jack Hagerty
ARA Press
www.arapress.com
 

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Pygar said:
But the only rocket I recall watching was a spacewalk flight, and the tech of the time was so crude the network coverage consisted largely of a string puppet of an astronaut in a suit. The puppeteer tried to mimic what the astronaut was doing, since there was no TV cam on the flight. Any idea which flight this was? I'm trying to track down my earliest dateable memory...
Are you sure that wasn't Thunderbirds? :confused:
 

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Otto69 said:
"Happily we exercise, exercise, exercise!" :). And Jack Lalane is STILL alive :). [And don't forget having to wait for those old tube TVs to "warm up" before you could watch them ]
I've got an old Console Stereo with tubes in it. Its even so old it plays 16 speed records. Anyone else every heard of them 16 speeders. They were mainly used for military recordings way back when. I Personally don't have any yet but just for the heck of it I am having our local antique record guy find me a couple.
 

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Oxidation Genius
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jhagerty said:
The images you showed are of a Mercury-Atlas. The Atlas was made from very thin stainless steel sheet (the differences in texture you see are the "grain" in the metal from the individual sheets). It was unusual in that it was a "balloon tank" vehicle, e.g. there was no internal structure under the skin. The skin was the tank wall with only bulkheads to separate the propellants. It had to be kept pressurized when not fueled because it could not even support its own weight when empty (I have some video of an Atlas/Agena at Vandenberg folding up like cardboard during a fueling mishap).

Most rockets of the period were aluminum skin over a frame. Usually the skin was painted (Thor, Jupiter, etc.) but sometimes not (Titan).

You also have to decide what point in the flight you want to model. The Atlas, for example, looks all shiny when first set up on the pad, but after fueling and through launch, it's all white on the top two thirds from the frost around the LOX tank. You also, obviously, can't see the "UNITED STATES" running down the side under the frost. The Titans, conversely, use "room temperature" propellants (hydrazine and nitric acid) so even though they're unpainted, they look the same all the time.

- Jack

Jack Hagerty
ARA Press
www.arapress.com
What are you, some kinda exp.... Oh wait, you are. ;)

How's the Saucer Book coming? I can't wait.
 
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