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Discussion Starter #1
This question may not have arose if I were working on a die-cast. But I'm working with white pine wood. I tried, for the first time, using Rust-O-Leum Universal Bonding Primer White. After spraying and letting it dry 1 hour past a dry touch. About 68 F. Very low humidity. I put a "final" coat of Rust-O-Leum Gloss Protective Coat, White, on the car just before going to bed last night around 1:00 AM. After checking 12 hours later it still feels like I could leave a finger print in the "final' coat. (I keep quoting the word "final" because to me that word implies I won't be doing it again. There is no such expectation when I paint anything.) The paper plate I used to paint the car on is dry to the touch... I'm pretty sure, eventually it will cure out and harden up. Pretty sure......

So anyone have this happen?
Ever find out why ?
What is the base of that Universal Bonding Primer? It sure don't clean up with mineral spirits. Water seemed to clean it best from a brush. So I'm assuming some kind of acrylic ?
Unless there is some kind of catalyst to expedite the present dry time...... I guess I wait !
 

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I've seen individual issues with Rust O Leum paints not drying for days every few years. Normally you should be able to handle them within an hour and recoat again in 24 hours, but every couple of years it seems a batch color or just an individual can just will not dry as fast as it is supposed to.

You can heat your oven to warm and place the car in there. I would leave the door open to lower the heat under 200 degrees. Or turn it on and off to control the temp.

Or take a hair dryer and set it to blow over the paint for awhile.

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Discussion Starter #3
Tried the hair dryer thing but it didn't seem to harden like I've had it do before on die-casts. Just going to let it dry several more days. You don' know how hard that is for me to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Stripped the Jag Lightweight this evening. Did the same procedure with the white primer, dried to the touch. Then + 1 hour. then gloss white. Waited an hour and hit it with the hair dryer. Still tacky ! WTH ! We'll see what tomorrow brings.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The Jag dried overnight. Still cures slow as molasses pours on a cold day. The wood Cortina is STILL tacky. Rust-Oleum may just not work on wood? It surely has to cure out eventually. I can't imagine having to strip this back to the wood without it screwing up the work that's been done on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I've got an air eraser.
It does seem to be drying. But as of this writing I'm STILL not able to handle it with any confidence. While it's drying I've turned my attention back to die-casts. Lets put this into perspective. Since I shot the Cortina; I have stripped and painted the Jag Lightweight (as a test of the white Rust-Oleum. Remember it dried). Stripped, reconditioned, painted and detailed a MB Lambo Marzal and a Citroen CX . I'm getting ready to start on detailing the Jag LW. Maybe by the time I'm through with it the Jag the Cortina will be dry to the touch. As of now I'd compare it to the tackiness of blue painter's tape..... Yeah that's an improvement.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just an update on the dry time. After 72 hours the paint has almost dried to the point I can get back to work on the Cortina. I feel a note to Rust-Oleum coming on.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
After somewhere around 80 hours drying time, The Cortina can now be worked on once more. Yeah.... I wrote Rust-Oleum. Probably take about as long for a response as it did for that paint to dry.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
What I wrote

FormData:
Over 72 hours ago I painted a piece of pine wood that I had used Rust-Oleum White Universal Bonding Primer as a primer base. After drying to the touch I let it set another hour before spraying Rust-Oleum White Gloss Protective Enamel as a finish coat. After 60 + hours the finish coat was still as tacky as blue painters tape ! I tried the exact same procedure and method I used on the pine wood on die-cast metal. The Bonding Primer cured in a reasonable time. The Protective Enamel took about 2 hours to cure. But it did cure to the touch in that time. Still kind of slow by my standards. But it did cure. The pine wood should be cured to the touch in another 24 hours. I'm just not used to having to wait a week for paint to dry. What did I do wrong ?



What they replied

Good morning Hayne,

Thank you for contacting Rust-Oleum Product Support.

We appreciate your interest in and use of our products!

Most of our coatings, including our Protective Enamel, take 10 days to reach a 100% cure and hardness in ideal conditions of 70-80 degrees and 50% relative humidity. A thicker coating, cooler temperatures, or higher humidity can slow this time. (Because Universal Bonding Primer is a primer and more porous, it feels dry to the touch more quickly.) A more porous substrate such as bare wood, may feel as though it is drying more quickly because the product is absorbing into the pores of the substrate.

We hope this is helpful to you. Please do not hesitate to reach out with any additional questions or concerns.

Sincerely,



WOW....... 10 days ?
 

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So if you used a wood primer/sealer on the bare pine and let it cure appropriately. However; long that takes.

Then applied the Universal Bonding Primer you should technically move back into their printed time frame on the can after eliminating the porous wood substrate.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Maybe..... I just assumed with a name like "Universal ' Bonding Primer" it would be....... like....... "Universal." My solution is. Go back to Krylon.
 

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C. H.,
I like Rustoleum paints, but their primer doesn't nearly as well as Krylon Sandable Primer. To be fair, The Rustoleum isn't marked "sandable" anywhere. You've made a profound statement, that one can't rely on any particular material (or technique, for that matter) to handle every job that might come along in plastic modeling. That's why I have several different brands of paints, glues, etc., so I'll have the right goop for the right job.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I mostly work with die-casts. But I've been doing it so long I've literally run out of new castings to work with. That's to say I've got almost everything "they" make that I want. So I started working in a new media. Pinewood. Actually the Universal Bonding Primer did pretty well in its drying time. Not great but it was acceptable. The white gloss finish coat was what took soooo long. Didn't have the same issue with the die-cast.
 
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