Hobbyist Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have some small plastic parts on a current project that need to appear like brass. I just bought some Krylon Metallic Brass paint. My question is what should I prime the parts with? I'm not sure if I should use gray primer, white primer or should I use black or silver paint first as a base? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,598 Posts
It would depend on the ultimate finish you're looking to achieve. The final shade of brass is dependant on the base coat under it - in this case, the primer. The lighter the primer, the brighter the final color. A light gray or white primer will give a brighter, newer look, while a dark or black primer will give your brass an older, darker look, maybe even tending toward bronze. I tend to think a red primer would richen the color some, but maybe give it too much of a coppery cast.

Having said all this, let me point out that I'm just flying by the seat of my pants here, going from limited experience with other "Metallizer"-type paints. Does the can label mention anything about primers in the instructions? Regardless of whether or not it says anything, I'd use a primer myself, because those paints are not specifically formulated for plastics, so it may have a reaction with the plastic. I use automotive spray touch-uo paint almost exclusively on my model bodies, so I've come to the point where I prime EVERYTHING before the color coat goes on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,493 Posts
It would depend on the ultimate finish you're looking to achieve. The final shade of brass is dependant on the base coat under it - in this case, the primer. The lighter the primer, the brighter the final color. A light gray or white primer will give a brighter, newer look, while a dark or black primer will give your brass an older, darker look, maybe even tending toward bronze. I tend to think a red primer would richen the color some, but maybe give it too much of a coppery cast.
That's simply impossible as the metal is made from actual powders. None of these are affected by the paint colour underneath. Once sprayed over there's no colouration present regardless of the colour of base, even if you use primer! I know, I've tried every single one on the open market, including industrial Transtar brand primer. The only things that are affected by the colour under them are pastels, or flourescent colours. These don't cover over well, and a light base helps them to have more presence, or brighter hue with less paint coats for coverage. Mostly this only happens with acrylic water based paints. However, you can use whatever undercoat with metallic paint that you wish without worry of discolouration.

~ Chris​
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
683 Posts
Well, There you go,, fenders506....Two totally Different View's on what to use, OR what not to use....Some question's just stur-up debate, between different Builder's...:rolleyes:..What work's for one, Dosen't alway's work for the Other....SOooo, When in doubt,,,sometime's it's better to just try it out on your own,, And see how it turn's out.....That's what I do, in case's like this.....:D

Besides, If your not happy with the result's, you can alway's Repaint and choose the other option.....

Good Painting....:)


MOE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I used plastic spoons to experiment with primers. I tried four different options:

1/ white primer only then brass
2/ gray primer only then brass
3/ gray primer then silver then brass
4/ gray primer then black then brass

After staring at the painted spoons for a few minutes I just couldn't see any difference. I then added some Future floor polish to add some shine. It's not as good as plating but it works for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,132 Posts
Yes the color of the base coat or undercoat can influence how the final metallic color comes out. Red is commonly used under gold, for example, to make it more bright.

Now, using thicker paint like spray cans etc. may negate the effect. But when you are applying it thinly, as with an airbrush, it does make a difference.

Notice too gold leaf is applied usually over a red base.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top