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Discussion Starter #1
I used Parma Faskolor for the first time yesterday, and I'm having some issues with it. I do auto body and paint for extra cash on the side, so painting isn't new to me, but this type of paint is. Basically, I'm wondering how long this stuff usually takes to cure out. Even today, after being in ambient 70 degree temps all night and all day, it's still soft and 'tacky' feeling, and peels off the lexan with ease. I washed and scuffed the body a little before I started spraying to remove any solvents from the mold process and hand/finger oils from your basic fondling before I sprayed, so I'm sure prep is not an issue. Is there a sealer I'm supposed to use in conjunction? I'm thinking next time I'll stick with regular automotive paint with flex additive....
 

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i all ways use a black after i put the color i want on it. its seems to work for me. but it does take a day or two sometimes i had that happen once or twice it might be that the pant in the rattle can was not mixed right or something.
 

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it might be that the pant in the rattle can was not mixed right or something.
I didn't know that Parma faskolor came in rattle cans...

Basically, I'm wondering how long this stuff usually takes to cure out. Even today, after being in ambient 70 degree temps all night and all day, it's still soft and 'tacky' feeling, and peels off the lexan with ease. I washed and scuffed the body a little before I started spraying to remove any solvents from the mold process and hand/finger oils from your basic fondling before I sprayed, so I'm sure prep is not an issue. Is there a sealer I'm supposed to use in conjunction?
I have used faskolor several times and the only time I had that problem was when it was applied too thick, paint and coats.

I generally wash the item with dish detergent ( Usually Lemon Joy) and rinse and dry really well with a lint free cloth.

Scuffing? Why ? Was it as clear Lexan body?

Prep may have been an issue.

When spraying a clear lexan body it should be sprayed on the inside of the body and lastly coated with a Faskolor sealer very lightly.

Far as drying time , very thin coats should be dry within the hour under thirty minutes when under a hair dryer or heated by a light bulb, too the touch at least but not cured , it takes approximately 24 to 48 hours to thoroughly cure.

Try useing a very thin coat and dry with a hair dryer for 10 or 15 minutes and add another very thin coat and repeat.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Let me re-iterate this a bit.

This is not the first body I have painted. It's the first time I have used the Faskolor line from Parma. Prep is NOT an issue. Every other body I have painted has been prepped the same way as this one, and I have never had an issue until I used this paint. I am using the flourescent colors if that helps any with the questions at hand. I know how to use my airbrush. I'll try the sealer and go from there.
 

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Let me re-iterate this a bit.

I am using the flourescent colors if that helps any with the questions at hand.
Parma Flourescents to me have a tendency to give the illusion that enough paint has not been applied to the coat and can eventually cause to thick of a coat.

That is the only problem I have had with faskolors not drying.

Part of the trick to faskolors is very thin coats between drying, as many coats as you want but apply each coat very thin.

The fas sealer will also look as enough has not been applied.

If enough time is not allowed between each coat to dry the next coat will wake up the first coat .
 

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Parma Flourescents to me have a tendency to give the illusion that enough paint has not been applied to the coat and can eventually cause to thick of a coat.

That is the only problem I have had with faskolors not drying.

Part of the trick to faskolors is very thin coats between drying, as many coats as you want but apply each coat very thin.

The fas sealer will also look as enough has not been applied.

If enough time is not allowed between each coat to dry the next coat will wake up the first coat .
x2!!!! I have mainly noticed this with the flourescents.I usually try and give flourescents at least 24hrs. dry time after they are backed before I peel any mask bordering the flourescent colors.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
ok, so basically what I'm dealing with is somewhat inferior paint out of these flourescents...nice of the tools at my local hobby shop to give me a heads up on them then. i specifically asked them for GOOD flourescents, and the faskolor is what they sold me...'goes on great, never had any issues with them at all'....

what can i say, I had high expectations due to poor information....
 

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ok, so basically what I'm dealing with is somewhat inferior paint out of these flourescents...nice of the tools at my local hobby shop to give me a heads up on them then. i specifically asked them for GOOD flourescents, and the faskolor is what they sold me...'goes on great, never had any issues with them at all'....

what can i say, I had high expectations due to poor information....
As the info you received- it's correct.Parma is the stuff. It is actually the same as the first series of Auto-Air automotive paints.

AS for body prep- all the professional painters reccomend cleaning with a cleanser such as dish soap AND lighty scuffing the areas to be painted with a green scotch brite pad.Remember you are painting a material that is known for it's anti-wear, and optical clarity properties so not scuffing is kinda silly while over scuffing will haze the finish.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
SJ, thanks for the link, much appreciated.

420, I'm just having issues with the flourescents. The rest of the faskolor I've used is indeed good stuff. Guess I just need to get a bit more practice with the flourescent paints is all. I always prep by first washing, then a light scuff with a red scotch brite, then rewash, followed by a thorough dry.

I appreciate all the help, there is obviously more of a trick to making this type of paint work than there is automotive paints.
 

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This was taken from a slot car web page.

Allow curing time before driving

Once you have completed your paintwork, you should leave it to completely cure before putting it on the car and driving. I find the best way to know if it has cured is to feel the weight of the bodyshell. When the paint first goes on it will be quite heavy because of the water content, but as the paint dries off it will lighten. Once you've done a few shells you get a good feel for the weight of dry vs wet paint. If I get a chance I will weigh a future shell when painted and record the results here, but doing it by judgement is okay. This is another important step to ensuring that the paint lasts a long time; if you run the shell as soon as the paint is dry it will scratch off. Once cured, the paint is far more durable - I've had a shell which was trodden on on it's first outing by a marshall. The shell was dented and popped out of shape, but the Faskolor paint on it remained in 1 piece even when I popped out the dent.

As a rule of thumb, I never drive a shell until at least 48 hours after painting, and prefer to have a week after painting to let it completely cure. Curing time is quicker in warmer weather or if the shell is kept at room temperature, but I still wouldn't recommend driving until 48 hours after the last bit of paint was laid down.

The paint is water based and the water will need to evaporate for the paint to cure.:thumbsup:
 

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A well worn red scuff pad and dish soap is good. I even scuff the window area before I mask. yes the fine scratches detract from your car guts looking inside. I sell automotive paint for a living. Laquer paint is the only finish that fuses with lexan. Waterbase won't dry fast when raining, snowing or high humidity. Multible coats take forever. It is the resins in the clear or sealer that penetrate the base coat to give maximum adhesion. Give your body some air flow or hair dryer and follow with the recomended sealer. Remember all paint directions are under ideal lab conditions. 75 degrees and 75% humidity. So if it is 60 it will double dry time. If it is raining it will probably triple the dry time of solvent based paints and longer for waterbourne.
 

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I've used Faskcolor for years and Trackman said it best at the end of his first post. Light coats and use a hair drier to dry each coat. Don't be afraid to turn the hair drier up on high just keep it moving so you don't over heat one area of the body.
 
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