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Hi,One of the reasons I like WNMHGB,besides all the action,It's an early look at The Enterprise and some of the original crew.I like the earlier bridge,namely the main viewscreen.The bridge panels are painted differently,and have those goose neck communication devices,adding a slightly older feel.Also even Kirk and Spock look a bit younger and believe it or not,blend well into the earlier setting.I hope this new prequel film is faithful to this time in Star Trek,remember this film is taking place a couple of years before WNMHGB,If anyone can post pictures of the Bridge from that time,please do so,Thanks,Guy Schlicter.
 

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Guy Schlicter said:
The bridge panels are painted differently,and have those goose neck communication devices,adding a slightly older feel.
I've always thought it interesting how much the look of the bridge set and costumes from "Where No Man Has Gone Before" (and "The Cage") clearly inspired the look of Star Trek: The Motion Picture much more so than what we saw during the regular series run.

Qapla'

SSB
 

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sbaxter said:
I've always thought it interesting how much the look of the bridge set and costumes from "Where No Man Has Gone Before" (and "The Cage") clearly inspired the look of Star Trek: The Motion Picture much more so than what we saw during the regular series run.

Qapla'

SSB
I agree! The idea of an older captain and the executive officer called "number one," made it all the way to TNG. And, TNG is just a modified version of the situation in Star Trek the Motion Picture.
 

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IIRC the reason for the term "Number One" was because Gene Roddenberry always wanted that term used in the show. I don't know why it was not used in TOS, but it was Roddenberry's influence on TMP and TNG.
 

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Guy Schlicter said:
remember this film is taking place a couple of years before WNMHGB
I don't think that's been confirmed.

If anyone can post pictures of the Bridge from that time,please do so,Thanks,Guy Schlicter.
Watch "The Cage" or "The Menagerie."
 

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One of my favorites also. As to why they changed the color scheme, it was when the networks, NBC in particular, were pushing color programing. Star Trek, IN COLOR! Look at the NBC shows, and there was color everywhere. NBC used to shine colored lights on the walls in their programs, it became a signature of "The Man From U.N.C.L.E", and even "Dragnet" did it. Any place that they could add, or brighten color they did.

As to why they dropped the term, Number One for the First Officer, that was probably fall-out from the Majel Barrett fiasco. The less, the Network was reminded, the better for the show.

David.
 

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Krel said:
As to why they dropped the term, Number One for the First Officer, that was probably fall-out from the Majel Barrett fiasco. The less, the Network was reminded, the better for the show.

David.
Boy, I hate to ask, but "what Majel Barrett fiasco?" I should probably know, but I don't...

Brad.
 

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The short version of the story is that after seeing Star Trek's original pilot The Cage, NBC requested some changes, one of which was that they didn't like the fact that a female character had that much strength of character and authority, and they wanted her removed; after all, this was the mid-60's. Also, as Roddenberry would later joke, they added "And while you're at it, get rid of the guy with the ears." Roddenberry was eventually allowed to keep one or the other and, being a storyteller, decided the character of Mr. Spock had more potential, so "Number One" was written out of the revised pilot and Majel Barrett was once again unemployed.
 

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Actually, the characters of Number One and Spock were combined into one character. Number One was originally supposed to be the unemotional, logical character.

Which is one reason I doubt Martin Landau's claim that he was originally offered the part of Spock. He claims he turned it down because he didn't want to play a character without emotion. But as most TREK fans know, Spock did have emotions in the original pilot. I seem to remember reading an article in (I think) Cinefantastique where one of the producers said what actually happened was Martin Landau was approached as a threat to keep Nimoy in line. If he started making too many demands, they'ld tell him he could be replaced with Landau.

I think the look of the Enterprise in the pilots has actually aged better than the look in the rest of the series. The pilots have a '50s look to them while the rest of the series has a definite '60s look. Unfortunately, the '60s had some very unfortunate design ideas that haven't stood up over time. I'm reminded of an on-line review I once read where someone remarked on other reviewers' remarks that a movie was "dated." Only movies from the '60s and '70s seem to get this complaint. No one ever complains that THE BIG SLEEP or IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE looks dated.
 

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BEBruns said:
I think the look of the Enterprise in the pilots has actually aged better than the look in the rest of the series. The pilots have a '50s look to them while the rest of the series has a definite '60s look. Unfortunately, the '60s had some very unfortunate design ideas that haven't stood up over time.
The Enterprise as seen in "The Cage" had some pretty dated features: Round-cornered viewcreens, baggy uniforms, a clunky-looking communicator encased in Lucite, and an obviously mid-20th-century television set in the Captain's quarters!

Of course, TOS did have those silly miniskirts.
 

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I think the pilot bridges monochromatic color scheme helps give it a more "rooted in reality" feel. Most workplaces tend to be fairly bland looking. I doubt if you walked into a military or professional environment, you'd see too many candy colored panels and doors. The overhead monitors were a little more interesting in the pilot too.
 

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Overall, I prefer the look of the ship and props from "The Cage" over WNMHGB.

They put greeblies from a typewriter on the lasers and that clunkly "phaser rifle" looks like something out of "Flesh Gordon." "The Cage" lasers looked just fine without the extra doodads added.

One thing the new versions of the orginal series are bringing out is the difference in uniform colors between engineering and command in the two pilots. You can more clearly see the green color of the command uniforms and the engineering tunics are plainly tan. I think the inability to visually separate those colors in the pilots was one reason engineering's tunic color changed--along with the desire for brighter colors for the TV sets.

The Starfleet tunic emblems from "The Cage" I read once were white instead of gold and edged with silver thread instead of black. It's hard to see the color of the leatherette on TV but the lack of a black outline is easy to see. Has anyone else noticed how this distinction is rarely made in the manuals and encyclopedia?
 

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PerfesserCoffee said:
I think the inability to visually separate those colors in the pilots was one reason engineering's tunic color changed--along with the desire for brighter colors for the TV sets.
The other reason for the change in colors was that the three colors, while appearing bright and distinctive on a color television, all appear to be the same shade of gray on a black & white television. Basically, it was to help sell TVs back then.

The Starfleet tunic emblems from "The Cage" I read once were white instead of gold and edged with silver thread instead of black. It's hard to see the color of the leatherette on TV but the lack of a black outline is easy to see. Has anyone else noticed how this distinction is rarely made in the manuals and encyclopedia?
The main reason for not noting this in manuals and other illustrated references is the fact that a black outline (and a thick black outline especially) are easier to draw/illustrate than a light colored boarder.

I know that is the reason I put a heavy black outline on insignias... even ones that didn't actually have them when seen on the series.

I was playing around with Photoshop last night and happen to be playing with this very issue. I made four insignias that were used for ships in the series and tried to match the look and feel of them as they appeared on screen (it's not perfect, this was mainly an exercise to keep my Photoshop skills fresh).

 

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Shaw said:
The other reason for the change in colors was that the three colors, while appearing bright and distinctive on a color television, all appear to be the same shade of gray on a black & white television. Basically, it was to help sell TVs back then.
My understanding is it was just the opposite. The colors for the series uniforms were chosen because they were different shades of gray.

Something I noticed in watching the re-mastered WNMHGB is that in this episode, the tunic emblems seem to be used to indicate rank. Kirk and Spock had the star (command) symbol, lieutenants and lieutenant commanders had the double circle (science) symbol, and ensigns had the spiral (services) symbol. This makes sense since all officers (except the Captain) had only a single gold braid on their sleeves.
 

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BEBruns said:
My understanding is it was just the opposite. The colors for the series uniforms were chosen because they were different shades of gray.
I guess I could be wrong...


... then again. ;)
 
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