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I've ran a set of ceramics since the '03 nats Lisa,and they are still as smooth as can be!Just a little drop of zubie or bulit in each after rinsing out with wd40 and you're ready to go!
 

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As a rule of thumb, in spec and stock you can run the mess a tick on the loose side. This will help free up the gears and allow them to be more efficient and reduce gear drag. At Sandhills we actually use a little bit of bushing oil on the gears to help make them more efficient for stock racing. I do not think it picks up a 1/10th per lap but it does lubricate 2 surfaces that are creating friction. If you think about it, in all sealed off-road or Touring tranny's they use grease to lube the gears! You can not do this out doors because of the natural dust of pavement racing.

Our standard spurs have 6 inner holes in them so they can be used on a Touring Car. The Pro-lite Oval series we have can only be used on a straight axle cars that use the big diff rings.
 

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20TN40 said:
And a friend of mine recommended running a left front toe corrector. He said that it would allow you to run the chassis a little looser without losing control of the car. Does that make sense? I know there is a very fine line between loose, smooth and free to out of control.
The toe corrector is used to get rid of bump steer. You can raise and lower the outer tie rod end for a different angle on the tie rod.
 
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Tornado_Racing said:
At Sandhills we actually use a little bit of bushing oil on the gears to help make them more efficient for stock racing. I do not think it picks up a 1/10th per lap but it does lubricate 2 surfaces that are creating friction. If you think about it, in all sealed off-road or Touring tranny's they use grease to lube the gears! You can not do this out doors because of the natural dust of pavement racing.
I have tried "liquid" graphite that I brush a coat on both spurs & pinions, wait till it has dried. I have noticed a drop in gear noise and easy gear mesh. Also, it does not attract dirt as that of other liquid lubricants. Iam goin to try it on pro-lites that I got today at AAA(not stamped...yet !!!)

Henry E.
 

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A cheap toe corrector;take a set of steering blocks,with a dremel cut the right block arm off up next to the axle hole.place this UNDER the left block arm.temporarily put a 4/40 screw down thru the hole at the end and attach a nut,lining these 2 pieces up .Take a drill the size of a 2-56 screw and drill a hole thru both pieces up next to the axle hole,run a 2-56 thru it and attach a nut. remove the 4/40 screw and nut.now carefully take the dremel and cut off the hole where the ball end mounts on the top
block.be careful not to cut into the bottom piece.drill another 2-56 hole out close to the ball end,put the screw thru it and attach a nut.now thread your ball end into the lower arm,add a nut on the bottom,and there ya go! saves about 15.00​
 

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Since “the Site” will be down for a while, (don’t ask, I don’t want to talk about it LOL) I thought I would add to this diff building deal. I have been doing this for years and it saves a ton on buying the thrust bearing. Plus I’ll throw in another tip about spacing too.


Do what’s been said about polishing the diff rings, I like the Niftech Rocket rings because they are lighter. They take a little more working in the first time but they save a little on rotating mass. So do ceramic diff balls.

I use NO shouldered bearings anywhere in the diff.! All non-shouldered ones and all ceramic.

First put a thin ¼ inch axle spacer next to the hub on the diff side, then slid on the spur bearing. This spacer keeps the bearing from rubbing the hub. Now apply a THIN layer of diff lube (your choice) on the polished diff ring and put it in place (PINNED).

I use nothing but ceramic diff balls. They last a LOT longer and stay smooth.

Put a dab of diff lube in the palm of your hand and rub the diff balls in it. That is all the lube you will need on them. Put them in the outer ring of holes in the spur and slide it up on the bearing.

Add one more thin ¼ spacer. This is to keep the diff bearing and the hub bearing from rubbing against each other and slide the hub bearing on. Now hold the spur gear in place with one hand and slide the hub onto the axle and over the bearing.

Now is the part that I do different. (You must have a diff hub that has a recessed hole for the outer bearing for this to work) First put another NON SHOULDERED bearing in the outside of the hub. Trinity and the old Bolink sells/sold a three-piece blue thrust bearing (some were black). It comes in the Legends kit. Smear a thin layer of lube on the first thrust washer of the three-piece bearing and slide it on the axle. Smear a very little bit of lube on the bearing itself and put it in place.

Now for the part that is hard to explain. The last thrust washer of the three-piece bearing will usually not have enough room to fit on the axle, you run out of room. I glue it onto one of BRP’s orange plastic diff cones and slide the whole deal onto the axle. Then add a diff nut.

What this does is take ALL of the thrust off of the bearings in the diff and put it where it needs to be, on a “real thrust bearing”. The three-piece thrust bearing is almost indestructible and hardly every needs to be replaced. But the washers have to be treated like you do the diff rings and sand and polish them.
 

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Great info Lin,

The set up Mr. R/C Oval.com is talking about is very similiar to the Bolink Legends thrust assembly.

Hey Lin, the only reason I do not put the grease in my hand is because the natural oils from your skin can cause the diff to slip. Roman told me this many years ago. He said to make sure all of the diff stuff is free from oil in anyway. He said make sure you do not touch the diff balls or rings.

Just my 2 cents though. Mainly it's whatever works for each and own.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
I just want to know what time all of you will be at BMS July 2nd so I can do some serious trailer hopping! LOL This kind of information is SOOOO helpful to folks just starting out and from the comments on this thread, it's even very useful to folks who've been in the hobby a long time!

So what about the sanding and sealing of the chassis? And I'd like to hear some stuff about camber on high banked tracks.......where is a good place to start? And bumpsteer, I'm still not understanding. Can someone tell me what it is or what it feels like and why I need to get it out of my car?
 

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Sanding and sealing the chassis just protects it from chipping/cracking during a wreck.
On banked tracks I start out at 1 degree left and -2 degrees on the right site.
When running foams its easy to adjust the camber cause the foams start to wear high on one side low on the other, so you just adjust the camber so the tire wears evenly.
 
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20TN40 said:
I said the wrong thing, I meant caster. LOL, it's a blonde day!
LISA:::::Don't feel bad.....I got them "blonde's`moments" too.....my daughter always say...iam a natural blonde in my previuos life....wherever that was...eh !!! ( i hope i wasn't a cucaracha....lol)
 

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Lisa,

0° of caster puts the kingpin in a vertical
line. Positive caster means the kingpin leans rearward
at the top.

Increasing the positive caster on your car
will slightly increase the steering into the corner
but it will slightly decrease the steering exiting the
corner.

Reducing the positive caster will decrease
the steering into the corner but it will increase the
steering middle and exiting the corner.

The little white Associated shims = 2° increments

It all depends what you want the car to do.
A common castor to start out with is 0 degrees LF and 2 degrees RF.
I tend to always run 1 degree LF & 3 degrees RF or 2 & 4 at most tracks.
Just seems to make the car more efficient through the turns.

You run at BMS right, I looked back at my nats setup last year and we ran 4 degrees LF and 6 degrees RF. But double check with the locals to see what they are running.

Just make sure if you change your castor, to re-set your camber after then re-check your toe in/out cause it will all change with a castor adjustment.
 

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Ok I understand the camber caster piece. On a associated front end you can ony adjust with either two little white spacers in front or back right thats as far as you can go either way. Am I missing anything is there a way to adjust more??
 

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tourque56
On the associated stock plastic front end you have from 0 - 4 degrees adjustment.

There are other aftermarket aluminum castor blocks such as the Hyperdrive blocks that allow for more tuning options.

See the pic below for the Associated front end.
If you have a camber tool, just take you tire off and measure the angle of the kingpin to see what degree it is laying.
 

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I use #2 flat washers for my caster adjustments shims. They are a 1 degree adjustment where as Eric has stated the stock Associated washers are a 2 degree change. I use the stock Associated caster block on the RF and use 4 washers where as the you only use 2 of the stock shims. Using a Hyperdrive LF caster block I have to use 10 shims. 7 in the front and 3 in the rear. This gives me a perfect 0 degree adjustment. Beings each shim is a degree of adjustment I can change the caster 7 degrees when using the Hyperdrive block.

Here is a link to the shims I use:

http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXK035&P=ML
 

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Discussion Starter #37
This is probably a stupidly simple question, but does the shimming on the RF effect the caster on the LF at all? Meaning, if I can get this to come out right, if I shim the LF up like I want it and then move to shim up the RF, will my LF still be correct or will it maybe need another adjustment because of what I have done to the RF. Gosh, I hope that makes sense! LOL
 

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Moving just the RF has no bearing on the LF, they are independent. Generally speaking you should keep a 2* split in the castor always with more on the RF. The more you split the castor the more the car will naturally want to go left. At BMS you need quite a bit of castor to help drive the car up off the corner. Also remeber castor is a fine tune adjustment. a 1 on the 1-10 scale of adjustments 10 being capital changes.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
From another thread I was reading on, someone said to look at the BSR webpage as they had the temps listed for the tires. What does the temperature represent?
 

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20tn40, me and the show should get there about 2:00 pm friday to get in some high banked fast action come on in the trailer and we can talk about any thing you would like see everyone friday

marty"SUPERSTAR"freedle
 
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