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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #1
I've searched the threads but can't find the "no heat" solder/glue product I saw mentioned at some point. I've tried Liquid Wire and either got a bad batch or it plain does not work. My problem is with small items like TycoPro pickup wires - I've got the right solder (not sure I have the right flux) but always have a problem. Looking for something like Liquid Wire, only one that will work.

Thanks!

Tom
 

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LED Burner Outer
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11,710 Posts
Oh no!!! Not the cold heat gun!!! I bought one of those from the shack.. The tip is very fragile and busted two with in a month (at 10.00 a pop!). I know what you're talking about Tom, just can't recall where I seen it. I never tried it so I can't say it'll do the trick for you. For soldering I can give you a couple tips, and I'm sure someone else will jump in and give you more.

For one, make sure the surface you are soldering on is roughed up a bit. Like paint, solder needs something to bite to. Scratch it up with a small screw driver. This is especially helpful when soldering to flat surfaces like Tjet shoe plates.

I use a paste rosin soldering flux (the shack) before hitting the solder. A tiny spot is all you'll need to get a good bite.

Make sure your iron has a decent tip, and is hot before you start.

Pre-solder the spot where you're working before attaching what you're soldering to it. Also, pre-solder the wire you are attaching. Let it all cool down before reheating for attachment. You want the metal hot, not the plastic around it so use caution, don't overheat the metal, and it should all go together easy.

Watch the fumes when using solder, and even more so when using the flux. It doesn't smell nasty for no reason!!

Good luck with your project!! :thumbsup:
 

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Member of Da Band
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2,493 Posts
All good tips Joe. But pick up some small alligator clips at the Shack or where ever you can find them. Use them for heat sinks on those tiny wires. Have a good day!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Silver Conductive Epoxy

I've been using a silver epoxy instead of soldering delicate parts. M.G. Chemicals Conductive Silver Epoxy, 14g (0.35 oz):

Pros
  • It's easy to use. I can solder copper pipes but have had trouble with small slot car pieces (maybe it's the torch I'm using... kidding!)
  • It works for small parts in tight places

Cons
  • this stuff is pricey, it's several times the cost of solder (.35 oz was $25) but you don't need much
  • It's not real sticky, it take awhile to figure out how to best use it
  • It's not as strong as solder

I like it given my aversion to soldering small pieces but would prefer it to be stickier (and cheaper) but it's been working pretty well on my TycoPros. Not perfect but another possible solution. Attached is a pic of the stuff and a rather messy (but working) TycoPro repair.
 

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Joe sez:
Oh no!!! Not the cold heat gun!!! I bought one of those from the shack.. The tip is very fragile and busted two with in a month (at 10.00 a pop!).
You got two weeks per tip out of it? That's a lot better than I did.

But Swamper Gene sez (and when he talks, I listen):
...if you can master using a Cold Heat tool that is definitely the ticket.
Surprises me, Gene. Do you have any, er, 'tips' to give us for working with it? I'd pretty much written it off as what my Dad used to call "a catchpenny gimmick."

-- D
 
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