Hobbyist Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
527 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm slowly working to recover and improve my painting skills (lack thereof) from when I was a kid. I'm teaching myself airbrushing, but still rely a lot on painting details with brushes. I've run into some questions that hands on practice isn't helping much with:

Assume this is all with Tamiya acrylic paints using Tamiya acrylic paint thinner.

1) What is a (Golden Eagle) "Liner" brush for? I bought one with some other brushes from MicroMark and am having difficult using it to paint relief lines on kits. Am I using it for the wrong thing? These brushes are thin and longer than a brush of similar thinness.

2) What material brush is preferred for use with Acrylics? I bought some white tipped brushes at an art store. The guy there said they're for acrylics (rather than oils) and so they won't get soggy like natural hair brushes will when using a water based paint like acrylic. I also have Red Sable, and Golden Eagle (?).

3) How do I get Tamiya acrylics to DRY on primed styrene? I'll put down a first coat, hit it with a hair dryer to facilitate drying, and when it's dry to the touch I try putting on a second coat and the fresh paint near instantly strips off the first layer the moment I touch down with the brush. I.e. if I've painted brown over white primer, I'll see the old brown scraped away by the brush and I'll see the white primer. Also, for drybrushing, do I need to actually seal this stuff first with laquer?? :(.

4) I'm (naturally) having trouble with brush strokes in flat painted areas. I've tried a few different brushes. I'm talking about maybe 1/2" wide or less areas I want to paint a smooth, single color. I'm currently using a flat, angled, Golden eagle brush. They seem to be bound more tightly than the flat, non angled Red Sable brushes I also have. When should I used the more flexible brushes vs the tightly bound flat angular brushes?

4b) To get a non brush stroke finish with acrylics, should I be thinning them substantially and using repeated coats (see question 3 above), or should I try to lay on 1 thick layer and let the surface tension eliminate the brush strokes?

5) Should I be thinning the heck out of even Tamiya acrylics and painting on multiple coats?

Thanks in advance. I guess this stuff will be difficult to discuss in too much detail in a written forum like this, but any pointers would be welcome. Years ago I did quite well painting lead minis with Polly S paints, and I'm baffled as to why my skills at painting (admittedly with a different medium and different material kit) seem to juvenile. The acrylic isn't much easier to use than Testors enamel.

Robert
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
903 Posts
I have a couple of suggestions. 3. 'Dry to the touch' isn't the same as dry, especially with acrylics. Acrylics (any water-based model paint) has to cure, not just dry. My rule-of-thumb is: If you can smell it, it isn't dry.
4b. Trying to cover with a single thick layer isn't a good idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
The problem with the Tamiya paints lifting off come from the paint itself. It's like using enamel over enamel (hand painting). The second coat will re-soften the first coat, and it will come off. You might want to use a different primer. The first coat should be sticking well to it. Or try a different type of paint. Testor's Acryl works good for hand painting, and sticks well to itself. Tamiya works best in an airbrush. You also need to let it dry completely (a few days) before a second coat, if you hand brush.

Sometimes you don't need all those fancy brushes. That "liner" brush is for a specific technique of painting, and is also used for makeup application. It does what the name says.

Other things depend on what type of model you are building (material), how well the primer you use works on that material, and how the paint will work on the primer.

Styrene - a laquer/enamel based paint sticks and actually bonds to the plastic.

Resin/Vinyl - you need a primer that is "laquer" based so it will not effect the material of the model, but you also need one that will provide "tooth" for the following layer of paint.

Mr. Surfacer 500/1000 is the best primer I have ever used. I works great on all types of materials, and will not hide details. It sticks great because it is "laquer" based, but gentle enough for styrene. For best results, use the thinner that is made for the product. Floquil (enamel) is also a good primer but not for Vinyl or resin. It will crack and lift off, unless you use the spray type for "metal figures". It used to work great until the formula was changed.

YO
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top