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I remember some years ago Ford came up with a windshield defroster which was a thin coating which could be heated. It was discontinued shortly there after when car owners discovered it also blocked their radar detectors 100%...
Not only that, but I recall hearing that several of those windshields actually shattered; I think it had something to do with too quick temperature changes on the surface of the windshield if it was particularly cold outside.

I had a work-supplied Taurus station wagon that had one of those; never had a problem with it, though...
 

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The windows appear to be translucent white acrylic, what is often referred to as milk-white plexi. The three round lights on the bottom of the saucer are clear, IIRC from when one of them was sticking out before the restoration.
 

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Discussion Starter #2,024
I only recently discovered this thread and am amazed at the amount of detailed information it contains. It seemed that on every page I was learning something new or was seeing new detail I had never seen before. It’s also been amazingly gracious and generous for Gary Kerr to take the time to share with everyone what he learned and observed during the restoration process.

I’m working on a 2nd pilot version using the 1/350 kit and am in a research phase. Currently I’m focusing on the lights that were added for the 2nd pilot.

Gary, if you have a moment, I wonder if you might look over my list/inventory below and comment on anything I might have incorrect or have missed based on your notes from examining any unreleased high-res images or footage. I would greatly appreciate any input.
Here are some additional answers to your burning questions:

Saucer Rim:
• 2 illuminated rectangular portholes and 3 illuminated round portholes starboard aft – arranged round round rectangle rectangle round.

Correct

• 4 illuminated rectangular portholes starboard fore.

Correct

• 1 flashing navigation light midline fore with 2 round black portholes one on either side.

Actually, there are 3 holes, with a light bulb sticking out of the center hole.

• 2 black rectangular portholes port fore.

Correct

• black portholes port aft to mirror starboard aft or just blank?

Dark gray windows mirrored those on the stbd side, and were partially obscured by a thin spray of hull paint during the conversion into the Production version.

Saucer Bottom:
• 1 flashing navigation light with 2 round black portholes one on either side p/s aft

Actually, there are 3 holes on each side, and there's a light bulb sticking out of each center hole.

• 5 illuminated rectangular portholes above sensor dome starboard.
• 5 illuminated rectangular portholes above sensor dome fore (different configuration than starboard).

Correct - 5 illuminated windows in each grouping, plus one painted window in front.

• ??? above sensor dome port side?

Good question. The dimensions & locations of the fwd and stbd groupings of windows are annotated in pencil onto the studio plans - but nothing is shown on the port side. Possibly because the stbd window were to be mirrored on the port side, so Jefferies didn't bother drawing them?? I haven't found any reliably clear photos of the port side of the Pilot version 11-footer, but the 3-footer in 'The Cage' had a row of 5 painted windows and a row of two windows, mirroring the windows on the stbd side. I'd go with that arrangement.

• Sensor dome illuminated frosted clear/white.

Correct - and probably divided like a pie with the engraved lines carried over from the 1st Pilot version.

Neck (starboard):
• 8 illuminated rectangular portholes (2 with screen in front of or behind windows).

Correct - the screens were behind the windows.

• 2 illuminated round portholes.
• Top row aft rectangular porthole and diagonally adjacent round porthole blink on and off in unison but not in sync with navigation lights.

Both correct.

To be continued....

Gary
 

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Hello Gary!

I hope you had a good holiday. Thank you very much for your further feedback! I remember reading about the holes on the saucer rim and the underside that were left open in your article in Sci-Fi and Fantasy Modeling. Both parts of your article were excellent by the way and it's unfortunate that you weren't able to publish your full series of articles as planned. Also unfortunate that we've lost such a quality magazine.

Regarding the flashing lights on the neck and on the starboard aft side of the secondary hull for the 2nd pilot - I've seen clips where the lights go from on to off, but never back on. Most notably the slow left to right pass the ship makes during the opening credits of Where No Man Has Gone Before. Maybe the lights were timed so slowly that to see them flick off then back on would have required an unusually lengthy shot. Can anyone think of an episode that had a shot of the 2nd pilot configuration showing these lights flicking off then on again? Or even starting turned off then flicking on?

Thank you again!
Jim
 

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Hello Gary!

I hope you had a good holiday. Thank you very much for your further feedback! I remember reading about the holes on the saucer rim and the underside that were left open in your article in Sci-Fi and Fantasy Modeling. Both parts of your article were excellent by the way and it's unfortunate that you weren't able to publish your full series of articles as planned. Also unfortunate that we've lost such a quality magazine.

Regarding the flashing lights on the neck and on the starboard aft side of the secondary hull for the 2nd pilot - I've seen clips where the lights go from on to off, but never back on. Most notably the slow left to right pass the ship makes during the opening credits of Where No Man Has Gone Before. Maybe the lights were timed so slowly that to see them flick off then back on would have required an unusually lengthy shot. Can anyone think of an episode that had a shot of the 2nd pilot configuration showing these lights flicking off then on again? Or even starting turned off then flicking on?

Thank you again!
Jim
I've always assumed that was just a light bulb failing during the shot.
 

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My initial impression was of someone saying 'Good night John Boy' and switching off a light or indeed a light failing. However, based on the photos I've seen of the port side of the neck, and seeing where the holes are drilled and where the wires emerge, I have the impression that each illuminated port hole is lit by it's own source light (or at least most are) so at some point those two lights were wired together into a separate circuit from the others. I would guess though, that the three 'port holes' on the aft starboard side of the secondary hull were lit by a single bulb just going by how the acrylic/Lucite rods are positioned inside the filming model.

As you watch the flyby/camera pan in the opening credits, the neck lights go out first then those three on the secondary hull. It's even possible that these two clusters of lights weren't controlled by flashing circuits, but could have been controlled manually from the control board to make a more dynamic shot as the camera panned.
 

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My speculation is that the few lights you are talking about were controlled manually and just turned off during the camera pass to bring life into the ship.
 

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After the model was updated again for production those lights remained and additional illuminated port holes were added. I believe from that point forward they were always seen 'on'. Also a new flashing navigation light was added to the starboard aft of the secondary hull surrounded by a bezel.
 

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I believe this item was referenced somewhere in this thread but Star Trek: The Original Series - The Roddenberry Vault [Blu-ray] is now just $27.52 on Amazon.
 

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I wish they would put out that Roddenberry Vault on DVD.
Sadly, we're heading towards a BD only world. It's pressure from the studios more than anything else because Blu Ray is harder, more time consuming to master and frankly, if you use a dual layer DVD you've got more than enough space to not need to over-compress the data.

Lots of reasons, not gonna bore people about it. It's not like the difference between VHS and DVD, keeping DVD going is a perfectly viable option, but it's not the road that will be taken. :/
 

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Since I haven't much interest in most entertainment these days I have no reason to buy equipment. It's been years since I bought any new release type discs. What I have purchased over those years is Old programming, particularly old TV programs. I'm completely bored with all the "explosive" content in films these days. There's just too much action for action sake. I prefer a more "engaging" type show.
 

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It has nothing to do with cost. I have a home theater setup and to tear it apart for what little I'd use it makes it not worthwhile.
I think all you'd need is the Blu-ray device and an HDMI cable connecting it to your receiver. At least that's how my "theater" is set up: TV, DVR box, PS3 all connected to 5/1 receiver w/ HDMI cables. You'd just need to make sure your receiver has enough HDMI inputs.
 

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My devices input to the TV and then the TV audio goes to the receiver. But, just wait a bit. Physical media probably won't be around much longer. The only 4K video I watch at home is Netflix.
 
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