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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK tips and tricks time, I really need some help here. I have always sucked *Badly* when it comes to getting a nice sharp finish on nameplate lettering.

I'm just finishing off a PL Hulk kit (Thanks Chris!:thumbsup:) and have tried the nameplate three times now but it just never looks neat enough. Yes, I'm getting older, and my hands are maybe as not as steady as they used to be, but sheesh, it's never been this tricky.

I'm probably complicated by my choice of colours too. I stuck with the instructions paint plan, namely a yellow background with dark green lettering. I liked that as I wanted to really stand out against the base, which is much darker tones of brown, sand, and a deep red.

I've currently got the plate stripping... again... :rolleyes: Any advice would be gratefully appreciated.
 

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Laird of Dunans Castle
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Are you painting all the way around the letters, Bruce? What usually works best for me is just painting the top surface of the letters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi James, yes just painting the tops. The lettering on this plate is really well defined and lots of straight lines. With the Auroras, I can usually get away with a drybrush and some gentle touching up. I don' think it's going to work this time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yep, have a nice pair of +350 magnifiers to help my old eyes :cool: I've been using a round brush too, maybe a small flat brush might give me more even coverage?
 

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try this: lay down a basecoat of your background color. when thats dry, paint the backdrop with some liquid latex (available at micheals, most hobby shops, and costume shops) when the latex is dry, drybrush the letters with the desired color until they are solid. once they are dry, peel away the latex.

if you thin the latex (with distilled water... must be distilled, not tap) you can use an eyedropper to apply it to the background, giving you a nice level edged mask for the background. in that case you can spray or "wetbrush" the paint onto the lettering.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the tip razor, I've got a bottle of 'maskol' which is essentially latex, but I hadn't tried it because it's so thick. I'll get a bottle of distilled water tomorrow and give it a whirl.

Photos coming when I'm done.

Cheers
 

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Models - Horror Figures and Science Fiction
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Oz,

If the latex doesn't work, try using your flat brush for the nameplate of - which model? I'm guessing The Incredible Hulk. It may take more than one pass to make the green letters opaque enough over the yellow background, but you'll get better control.

I have also painted a background color after having first painted the letters carefully, to keep them as crisp as possible. You'll need to thin the background color enough for it to flow into all the crevices. The trick is to keep a wet edge so a line of paint doesn't dry and spoil the smooth effect while you're fiddling with the voids in the center of an "O" or an "A".

Or, you can take the easy way out and paint the background, let it dry good and hard, then sand the nameplate's surface on some fine-grit - say, 320 or 400 - sandpaper. This will expose the plastic beneath the raised lettering, which should contrast nicely against the yellow b.g.

Good luck!

Mark McG.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Yes it is the Incredible Hulk nameplate Mark, lot's of dead straight lines...
I'm going to try the masking with latex this morning after the hubub settles here. I'll post later and let you know how it went.

I hear you about the wet edge of the paint. It is VERY hot down here in Brisbane now and paint working time is minimal before things start to harden, can be very frustrating at times, and it certainly contributed to the problem I was having here.

I normally keep a clean tray of water handy to keep my brush moist while I'm working, and change it in between colours.
 

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Ok Bruce, heres one more: I paint the entire plate with enamels, usually in a spray can, let it dry for a few days or so, then place it flat on the table and flood the entire plate with backround color, done in craft acrylic, thinned with Future usually, just to make it flow a little better, cover it deeply, use a small brush to dab it into every corner and crevace. Give it about 20 minutes or so, it should be tacky, but not completely dry. Tear off a small piece of paper towel, fold it several times until you have a flat edge about 1/4 inch wide, dip it in rubbing alchol, and wipe across the raised lettering and the border, wipe a couple of times, throw away the paper towel and repeat with another. The alchol will cut the craft acrylic, but will not touch the enamel if you have given it enough drying time. Give it a day or so to dry and shoot a little dullcoat on it to blend it all together. This works pretty good for 53 year old eyes:tongue:
 
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