Hobbyist Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having a little problem with lighting the nacelles on PL 1/350 1701/A. I first tried using the clear straw method with a blue/purple led on each end, well that didn't work{ had a dead spot in the middle} next I tried clear acrylic 1/4in rod with leds in each end, dk blue led worked better but still had a slight dead spot, purple was not so good.
Does any one know how I can fix this problem and get a nice even blue/ purple glow effect. I have looked for CCT's but they are usually to long or to short. Any and all help will be greatly appreciated:beatdeadhorse:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Search model man tom here on hobbytalk or youtube. He has developed a good method using both 1/4in rod and cct's which I am using for my 1/350 Reliant bash. It uses "stacking" the 1/4 in rods and the results look really good.
 

·
Modeler's Brand
Joined
·
2,376 Posts
Here's the post. From my PL 350 Destroyer thread. Hope it helps. The effect is superb.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Did I just come across the holy grail of warp drive lighting?

Let's review the two common techniques in circulation.

LEDs: No good because they create hotspots no matter how many or few are used.

CCFL: A single CCFL tube by itself looks bad because it looks like a single ccfl tube behind the grill that demands four light beams. And more than one ccfl becomes logistically unfeasible fast.

But...
I was at a plastic supplier the other day and saw a 1/8" x 6' acrylic rod. It struck me that slicing it down and gluing ten lengths into a pyramid of 4 rows (4,3,2,1) just might diffuse the light perfectly.

The base 4 across match the warp grill design, then stacking 3, 2 and 1 rod on each other and backed directly with the ccfl tube. I thought this would bounce the photons and light all four rods at the grill backface. That didn't quite work as I thought. The light did bounce around, but it went straight to the outer edges of the four rods and mostly missed the interior two rods.

However a variation of this idea looks utterly perfect! Take a look. I think I nailed it!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,220 Posts
It's all in the way you apply the effect. This effect was done with just two leds and no other BS. Call me if you need some help.

Thanks
Randy Neubert
VoodooFX
1-650-568-3400
Agreed. I used the same basic technique with great results. The only thing I really did as an extra was to brush several coats of clear flat at each end of the clear tube and feather it in to the middle and then apply by AB the same effect on the back of the nacelle inserts.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,134 Posts
Here's the post. From my PL 350 Destroyer thread. Hope it helps. The effect is superb.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Did I just come across the holy grail of warp drive lighting?

Let's review the two common techniques in circulation.

LEDs: No good because they create hotspots no matter how many or few are used.

CCFL: A single CCFL tube by itself looks bad because it looks like a single ccfl tube behind the grill that demands four light beams. And more than one ccfl becomes logistically unfeasible fast.

But...
I was at a plastic supplier the other day and saw a 1/8" x 6' acrylic rod. It struck me that slicing it down and gluing ten lengths into a pyramid of 4 rows (4,3,2,1) just might diffuse the light perfectly.

The base 4 across match the warp grill design, then stacking 3, 2 and 1 rod on each other and backed directly with the ccfl tube. I thought this would bounce the photons and light all four rods at the grill backface. That didn't quite work as I thought. The light did bounce around, but it went straight to the outer edges of the four rods and mostly missed the interior two rods.

However a variation of this idea looks utterly perfect! Take a look. I think I nailed it!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FoaWYt0xKMI&feature=PlayList&p=3DA4C5CCA10F8975&index=6
heh. I'm a believer! You've converted me Tom!

FYI, those of you who know me know I've always been critical of lit models. This is just superb!
 

·
Modeler's Brand
Joined
·
2,376 Posts
heh. I'm a believer! You've converted me Tom!

FYI, those of you who know me know I've always been critical of lit models. This is just superb!
As no one, most of all I, wants to sit thru all of that video, here's a few tripoded pix I took to illustrate the light of one ccfl better. The ccfl is not best positioned or angled in these pix.

Just a blurry one to show the amount of light overall.
Blue is much brighter than this UV purple.


The wretched registration pins show up very well in this scenario.
The shimmer of light on the right is typical as four will race down the acrylic rods as you turn the nacelle.


Exposed at 1/4 second. Some of the blotches come from the scotch tape holding the acrylic in.
The rest is smudging and classic 'stair stepping' of diagonal lines.


The scotch tape is clear in the bottom left in these.
The notch in the mid-center-top is the registration key.
Haven't figured a way around that blemish yet...






A pic of all you need.


  • 1 ccfl, blue or purple
  • 1/8th acrylic rod(s) cut into 4 strips glued together w/ acrylic glue
  • n model parts.
  • Not shown, power inverter for the ccfl which must fit 'close' to the light.
Good thing: 1 inverter (conveniently) powers two ccfls simultaneously.

Bad thing: I have seen many fry before making into the model. Was very likely me over-amping the inverters... I ran this photo shoot off a 5v wall wart.

CCFL's (conveniently) sell in pairs, can be gotten at many computer stores, computer fairs and regular flea markets may likely have them too. Otw, you're stuck w/ ebay. About $12 even at ebay prices for the foot long. haven't bought the 6" yet, but those could be better as 1' is a tight fit...


To note is that the power on these things is huge! Getting shocked by the power line (only if you remove the ccfl glass from protective tube) is highly freaking shocking. Avoid it! As w/ all electricity, be careful first!
 

·
Modeler's Brand
Joined
·
2,376 Posts
You guys admirably push what can be done w/ two leds 'and no BS'.
But given these photos, I just don't see a comparison.

ccfl/acrylic rod looks like perfectly-aligned, miniature, multiple neon beams running through the nacelle.


The led shots look like hot spots and cold ranges, whether it's one led or a dozen. While those specific pix look decent, change the viewing angle and I think the illusion breaks? The real test for leds is full-length, dead-side-on.

This is not to malign the fine work done by others here! I followed AJ's craftsmanship w/ devotion. Voodoofx and all the electronic guys are a value of great stature in their own right. My disclaimer is that I have yet to build my first 350! I happened upon this ccfl/acrylic rod technique by pure chance while working on other models. It was my Eureka moment (fortunately I was not in the bath at the time).

Like Magesblood, I'm critical of lighting, as poorly and sloppily as I do it. As I haven't built one 350 yet, I stand in awe of all the nuance and finesse every builder puts into their ship. But every build I've seen, no matter how magnificent suffers when leds are used for warp lights. Maybe it's me that suffers to see them, and not them suffering themselves -being a plastic model and all. They become regular A's instead of the A+ they most often deserve. I will be happy to build mine to a B-. Hope you will all be critical when I post.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,134 Posts
I completely agree with you about the LED "hot spots". Just doesn't look very realistic. Might as well paint the deflector magenta. Extreme example but hopefully you'll see my point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Thats awesome! Thanks very much for sharing.

It makes sense optically, each layer of rod acts as a diffuser to the next layer so you get a very uniform lighting effect.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top