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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is the current state of my latest repair job.

It's a 1924 Jeager 2HP hit-n-miss engine off of a cement mixer.
It has a lot of issues, but I've restored worse basket cases in the past.

Rick
 

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I'll bet you are having fun. What part of the disassembly did the sledge hammer play/ From the photo, I can see that the wing nut has come off of the end of the kanobling rod.
Interesting!! I remember when I was a lad that my grandfather had an artesian well drilled at his home. Listening to that thing run was really something. I don't know whether the governor lifted a valve cut the ignition or what, but I do remember that pop, pop, pop cho -cho-cho when it kicked in. Have fun. Tom
Wanna see more as the restoration progresses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Well the 20 pound hammer was a crankshaft straightener.
That was one of the easy tasks so far. The carb needle was not.



Took about an hour at the lathe to make a replacement. And a lot more
parts to make or locate. I'd rather make them actually.

Rick
 

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Thinking back sixty years ago, seems I remember an exposed fly weight governor spinning away on the engine. How did it actually control the speed?
I will be checking for your progress reports. Tom.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Well Tom, let's see if I'm bright enough to explain how it works.
These are the components of the fly ball governor off this engine.

The fly balls (1) pivot out under centrifugal force, pushing the pin (2) in. That
pin pushes on the end lever (3) causing the other end to pivot in and catch
small block on the cam rod (4), blocking it from coming back to the cam. When
that rod is blocked out it holds the exhaust valve open and it can not move
to trip the magneto. So the exhaust valve is open and there is no spark. As
the engine speed drops the fly ball weights pivot back in the pin come up
allowing the lever to clear the block. The exhaust valve closes and the
engine fires. One such "hit" is enough to get the engine speed back up to
where the balls fly back out, and the engine will "miss" until the speed drops
again. And that's the Hit-N-Miss.
How'd I do? LOL


Rick
 

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You did great.
When I viewed the fuel needle chucked up in the lathe, it brought back some memories. Sixty years ago and a lad of 14, my Dad's friend, who was a watchmaker, taught me how to repair watches. I did pretty good at repairing them and called myself a watch repairman. Now in those days, the pros were called watchMAKERS. It has been years since I have seen a watchmakers lathe and wondered if that is what you have, that you can turn out such small parts. The pros in those days could turn out a balance staff, which is approx 3/16 long and 1/8 in in dia. Pivot pins at both ends and a shoulder for the pallet jewel to sit on as well as a flange for it to rest against. I can not understand how it was humanly possible.
Is that a watchmakers lathe that you depict in your photo?
As someone has already said, there is still some true craftmen around.
Keep us posted. Tom in upstate SC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The lathe is a Grizzly G4000 9 X 19

Great little machine for small engine size parts, and reasonably priced!
Here's a link to Grizzly's page on if if you think you'd like to learn more about
it. http://www.grizzly.com/products/G4000 It can make a machinist out of
anyone with the interest to learn it. No I don't work for Grizzly, but I sure
DO like their machines!

Rick
 

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Neat Machine

Man, I wish I had a place to put one of those, it would be nice to be able to just make some of the things I sometimes need! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Well this is where mine is. LOL

You learn real fast to not jerk your head up when a hot chip flys in your face.
Another issue was the lathe was 300 pounds in the crate. A little tough
going taking it down the steps.
I'd clean up that basement, but everytime I do, I can't find a thing for weeks!

Rick
 

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I have the same problem in my shop, I might clean it up once every six months, lol, when I can't move around freely, it's time to do some tidying. Wife won't go in it for this reason.....hmmm....may be on to something. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well, spent my New Years Day working at the Jaeger.
Made a little progress.
I got the junk all washed out of the water hopper.

It did clean out nicely and appears to be sound. I can't see any cracks anywhere.
I also managed to get the oiler cleaned up. It was pretty much a lump of hard old
grease and dirt, but it turned out OK too.

There are a couple little stress cracks in the glass, but it shoud be OK.
Another step was making a replacement cam gear shaft. The original was shot.

Still a LONG way to go!

Rick
 

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NICE keep us posted

nice!!! making your own parts... gonna see some other lathes soon... keep us posted! nice progess! :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
 
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