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Discussion Starter #1
My first thought...not bad at all. Being a Minichamps fan already, as well as having several Micro-Champs (the predecessor to this new series), I had a vague idea of what to expect. But I must confess, they surpassed anything I had in mind!

I just received my first (of many I am sure) new model, purchased at a delivered cost of $23.50...ouch. But if you want to play with the big dogs and all that! Also keep in mind that the racing replicas do carry a higher MSRP due to the license fees.

The first car I have purchased is this wonderful 2007 Porsche 911 GT3 RSR
as raced in the GT2 class of the American Le Mans Series (ALMS).
This is the 13th place car from the 2007 running of the 12 HOURS OF SEBRING. Driven by Jörg Bergmeister (D), Johannes Van Overbeek (USA) and Marc Lieb (D). I am a huge fan of the Flying Lizard team and have watch them win many races and even championships in these team cars (#44 & 45), so this seems a rather odd choice of race to feature for this release. But if you happen to follow sports car racing, then you know that obscure selections are pretty standard in diecast.

The tampos are second to none. For example, look at the correct MICHELIN logo on the tires, very impressive indeed. The interior is very detailed as is the over all paint. The colors do seem accurate, but there is just a slight hint of orang peel. Also, a nice touch on the wheel nuts, notice they are color coded for each side of the car as the 1:1. Overall, not quite the level of Kyosho, but right on their bumper.

I hope you guys enjoy the photos. The last pic is with it's big brother, the Minichamps 1:43 version.

Ward









 

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Thanks for the beautiful pics and wonderful story Ward :thumbsup:

I luv the cars but yet I'm waffling on these. :confused:

I really want to get the older Porsches coming out in December. ;)


Denis
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I do understand that, at the current pricing, one does have to plan ahead with all our purchases.

With ALMS being maybe my favority series in North America right now, I knew the racing replicas were going to be my first choice. But as of right now, this is still the only one I have bought!
 

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Nice review and photos, thanks Ward!

Where did you buy the car? I am looking for a good dealer or reasonable / reliable E_Bay seller to pick up some Monichamps.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
From a Audi dealership outside Atlanta, selling on ebay as gwinnettaudi09. I was very pleased with the communication and very fast shipping. I am sure I will do business again with them.
 

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Beautiful castings - what a shame that for the price, it would have been nice to see what they could have done with openings in this quality range... it is much easier - technically - to do a high detail curbside than it is to do a mediocre casting with openings (I am NOT saying MiniChamps should target mediocrity, but rather target high quality but with openings with tight tolerances). Obviously, they went for the easier route.

In any case, I do NOT think that Kyosho's beat these out. I have several of them and though some of the Kyosho castings are good (especially the recent ones), many of them are pretty poor. In fact, I prefer the CMs' over the Kyosho when comparing the Lambos head to head, as well as the Tomica Japanese rally cars.

Kyosho's Beads collection is intended to to be high end, and again a mixed bag in terms of castings detail/quality. For example, the white Lambo Countach is pretty awful considering its price and target audience, while the F1 Honda is pretty nice with crisp lines (but of course, no openings and therefore I would expect better lines given the simpler task for production).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
My fried Sheldon, it's so nice to see you!

As we have well defined, I prefer my 1:64 curbside to open in almost 95% of the castings I have ever see (at least as far as doors are concerned). But I do agree, I would like to see what quality one of the boutique manufactures could produce with panels if they applied themselfs.

But I was serious, I've wondered where you've been lately. I had noticed you missing from the boards, or at least had not noticed any post. Glad you are back, I always enjoy our banter. You’re a knowledgeable and passionate collector

Ward
 

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The second I saw Sheldons name, I knew he was gonna mention the non opening doors. :)
Are these about 1:50th scale Ward?
Very nice...beautiful pix too!!!!!
 

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I roam these boards.... nothing interesting to post at times.

In any case, I have to speak for those who appreciate openings. The criteria is simple: cars are "machines", the root word of course implies something in "motion" or "movable". Not that etymology is the source of the criteria, but rather the extra craftsmanship that goes with well implemented opening panels is appreciable....
 

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I roam these boards.... nothing interesting to post at times.

In any case, I have to speak for those who appreciate openings. The criteria is simple: cars are "machines", the root word of course implies something in "motion" or "movable".
well the cars roll, sort of. ;)
 

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I roam these boards.... nothing interesting to post at times.

In any case, I have to speak for those who appreciate openings. The criteria is simple: cars are "machines", the root word of course implies something in "motion" or "movable". Not that etymology is the source of the criteria, but rather the extra craftsmanship that goes with well implemented opening panels is appreciable....
Speaking for those who don't mind "curbsides", as you term them, I will repeat what I said to you yesterday on the 1/43 board: "Our viewpoints differ, thats all. As an engineer, you view cars as a machine. The artist in me appreciates the form. We both agree that proportion in a casting is very important, yes?"

From having spent 30 years in the retail automobile business, Robert, I learned that it's the "sizzle" that sells cars. The sizzle begins with a photograph or a TV advertisement where the form of the car, not the opening panels, brings the buyer into the showroom. Panels are only the entry ports to the engine - the mechanical - and to the interior - more form once again. The performance of that machine may then "seal the deal" but until that point it is the form of the automobile or truck that rules the senses.

Many of us view a diecast model as a work of art meant to be appreciated with the eye regardless of whether panels open or not. I respect your opinion of the importance of opening panels, but I think that you may be "preaching to the choir". Opening panels may enhance the model and I would perhaps appreciate it all the more; the lack of opening panels, though, would not deter me from purchasing a model that is proportionately pleasing, or very simply that I like it.
 

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In any case, I have to speak for those who appreciate openings. The criteria is simple: cars are "machines", the root word of course implies something in "motion" or "movable". Not that etymology is the source of the criteria, but rather the extra craftsmanship that goes with well implemented opening panels is appreciable....
Cars are machines, diecast cars are models.
Many early show cars didn't even move under their own power, but some where beautiful beyond discription.

But then again, opening trunks are wicked cool 'cause you can play "illeagal moonshine runner". ;) :tongue:
 

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Diecast cars, as produced by Mattel, Maisto, Jada, etc. in 1/64, qualify as simple machines in that they employ the wheel and axle and lever mechanisms. As the realism of the "models" increases, their status as machines will inevitably elevate. I believe that we collectors appreciate the realism that companies design into their products and the greater the realism, the greater the appreciation. As the level of realism of offerings by Mattel increases, it's becomes harder for companies like Minichamps or Kyosho to justify such premium prices for their products without offering things like opening doors, hoods, etc. As beautiful as that Porsche is (I am an artist and designer as well), I can't reconcile paying high prices for pretty tampos. With all due respect to all opinions here. I am inclined to agree with Sheldon.

PS. As funny as Lummox's post was, I think it speaks volumes as we love the realism in our toys because it facilitates our imaginings and play.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I do enjoy the debate, and I believe that is a part of the fun in collecting. This thread is a wonderful example of the passion that drives us in our collections.

But for the sake of the argument, let me clearly stand on the opposite side of this line. I neither am an artist ( my daughter is) nor an engineer (that is my son), but as the old saying goes, "I know what I like".

What I like is exotic subject matter executed with deadly precision and breathtaking presentations. A lot of words to say, that for me, these cars more then justify my participation with these expensive curb side models.

Being a collector of racing replicas, I expect to pay premium dollar for this level of presentation. Speaking of these race based castings, I know that there will be few opportunities for the manufacturers to recoup their licence fees and tooling cost as their is only so many examples of any given race car in which to replicate. This is not Nascar, where one generic casting and a simple license fee will cover the bulk of the continency sponsors. These are almost “two or three off" releases, as their is no street car to be produced from the casting. I know that will cost me dollars should I choose to purchase these cars.

So in direct opposition to your comment, I CAN justify paying the price for a release with "pretty tampos" based on the subject matter alone. Understanding that these types of cars and subjects or themes have very limited mass market appeal, I know that the per unit price tag will be substantial.

NOW, beck to the central debate...I STILL DON"T LIKE OPENING PANELS ON MY 1:64 TOY CARS!!!! Very few...VERY few examples exist that I feel were improved by opening all the panels. Their seems to be a sacrifice required to open all the panels in this scale and it does not appeal to my taste. Give me the clean lines of the art and let someone else enjoy the technical qualities of opening doors and trunks. I purchase Minichamps or Kyosho ( or CM, Tomica high end or even 100% Hot Wheels) for the overall presentation of the subject matter, not the technical accuracy. Truly a case of something for everyone, thier is no right or wrong view, just different views.

So let the debate rage, and while you guys are arguing among yourself, I will be looking for the best deal for far too expensive toy cars!!!!

Ward
 

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Just my opinion, Ward, and my comment was related to the exchange between 54belair and Sheldon and not to you or your Porsche. That comment was meant to address 54belair's comment about form. It's your money, Ward. I don't think anyone cares what you spend it on. If you know what you like, then there's no need to justify it. Frankly, I don't care what or why anyone collects and even less what they are willing to do to collect it. A respectful and stress-free exchange of opinions is the only thing that concerns me on this board.
 
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