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Been a while since I logged in. Don't remember why I chose the name Powertweak. I am just a man who tries to keep my outdoor equipment running. My Dad has a Poulan 2055 chainsaw that got where it was very hard to start. I purchased a new Walbro WT-891 for it, cleaned the fuel tank, installed new fuel lines and pick up and new air filter element and spark plug. The saw still acts like it is not getting fuel properly. I used a dremel to cut slots in the hi and low adjustment screws and while I had them out got mixed up. The hi and low speed screws both have the same thread, but otherwise are different. One has a slightly longer needle. Can anyone tell me which is lo and which is high and maybe getting them right and adjusted is the only remaining problem. Now I wish I had just bought him a new saw. I may go back and check the new fuel lines. The process of installing them is a little rough on the fuel lines. Sometimes I clean/rebuild/replace carbs and fuel lines and the equipment runs like new and other times like this one I obviously miss something. I would like to spend a day in a shop with a professional using something like my Dad's Poulan as an example so I could see what I missed or messed up. By the way, back to the hi and low speed screws; 1 has a round almost pointed head while the other is flat. Thanks for listening to me run on. I reference this forum a lot.
 

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The length of the screw working ends is usually different, and by looking the screw bosses (jet areas) you may be able to discern which goes where.
If one is narrower / pointier than the other, that one is usually the idle, or low speed side. (Often marked with a "L")

As for all you've done and for it to still be hard starting, I'd say there's a different problem than fuel administration...

I've seen a fair amount of the newer made Poulan (not the original Poulan's of decades ago) saws that have a vertical cylinder end up with scoring of the piston/cylinder. Pull the spark plug, and peek in there with a flashlight. The cylinder as you probably know should be shiny, with no vertical grooves in it.

Of course, there could be a CC vacuum leak.
 
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