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LOL!!!!!!!!!!!love it and uh...let's see you created that in 120 hours with $ 24 dollars worth of plastic...just in time for the 50th !!!
surely the R&D must have taken you the better part of a year right.....This and other reasons is why R2 missed the boat entirely
It won't be long before we're all printing our own models, sharing files and uh...putting some people out of business....
It's about staying relevant and one step ahead of the game these days....
Job well done !
 

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Discussion Starter #3
LOL!!!!!!!!!!!love it and uh...let's see you created that in 120 hours with $ 24 dollars worth of plastic...just in time for the 50th !!!
surely the R&D must have taken you the better part of a year right.....This and other reasons is why R2 missed the boat entirely
It won't be long before we're all printing our own models, sharing files and uh...putting some people out of business....
It's about staying relevant and one step ahead of the game these days....
Job well done !
No R&D time. I downloaded the model from Thingiverse (Star Trek - The Original Series Klingon D7 Battlecruiser by nd4spd1919 - Thingiverse).

The model was not 3D print ready, however. I probably spent about 20 hours in a 3D modeling program cutting it into printable size chunks and repairing some pieces because they weren't watertight. Even then, some of the prints aren't perfect and will need a little work.
 

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Did you use 100 microns (0.1mm)as your resolution? I was thinking of doing something like this, but all of my test prints do not allow for fine detail, even at 50 microns (0.05mm). I have been using PLA (polylactic acid) filament to get used to the process. It is a surprising tough material. Any ideas as to the best sand grit to start with to smooth the surface?

I know ABS can be smoothed with acetone, but it also makes any finer details lose their edge.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Did you use 100 microns (0.1mm)as your resolution? I was thinking of doing something like this, but all of my test prints do not allow for fine detail, even at 50 microns (0.05mm). I have been using PLA (polylactic acid) filament to get used to the process. It is a surprising tough material. Any ideas as to the best sand grit to start with to smooth the surface?

I know ABS can be smoothed with acetone, but it also makes any finer details lose their edge.
It came out fairly smooth at 100 microns and I plan to use XTC-3D to smooth it out further. Using that on the surface greatly reduces the need to sand the PLA which, I agree, is very tough to reduce. I'll post more pictures after I have the surfaced prepped and primed.

At 1:350 scale, I did not find that there are that many "fine" details actually.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Is this lightable? (and yes, I know the original prop wasn't . . . )

Great creation, by the way ! :thumbsup:
This model wasn't built to be printed, much less lighted so it is pretty solid. I thought long and hard about drilling holes and taking advantage of the few cavities that did exist in it to light it but, in the end, decided against it. As I said at the beginning, this was mainly a 3D printing experiment to see if I could make a decent 1:350 model.

I was able to run an aluminum rod through the neck to provide a little more strength to that part.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
great model will you be releasing the files for other 3d modelers so they can print one.
The files I ended up printing from are, in some cases, not very good. Some wouldn't print from Simplify3D correctly because they weren't truly manifold. Makerware for the Replicator 2, however, does its own unions of objects and it printed the parts Simplify3D wouldn't. I had to putty up some holes and stuff in a few of them. Someone else may be able to take the model from Thingiverse and do a better job on parting it out than I did.

The model itself is really quite well done--it just was never meant to be 3D printed (especially not in parts).
 

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Discussion Starter #17
To give the model a smoother surface than you get with 3D printing, I used SmoothOn's XTC-3D brush-on coating for 3D printed parts and then followed that up with a few coats of Rust-Oleum Filler & Sandable Primer. This left me with a pretty decent surface on most of the model. I sanded it using foam sanding blocks, sheet sand paper, and sanding sticks.
 
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