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Discussion Starter #1
I liked the results of my first "de-tampoing" and paint detailing on the "Redphin" Hot Wheels '59 Bel Air a month ago that I decided to try a few more. After removing the offending tampos, I paint-detailed the head/taillights on all three, the grilles on the '78 Camaro and the Falcon, and the window reveals and bumpers on the '70 Camaro. That car also had it's chromed front spoiler repainted black, and I added flat black to the ends of it's exhaust tips. I liked the 'monochrome' look on the '78 Camaro with the body-color window trim, and to that end I hit the wheels with aluminum paint to dull the chrome sheen some (I may still go back and do the window trim on it, seeing how it came out on the '70... ). The panel between the taillights is black from the factory, though, so now it's black on mine. Same with the taillight panel on the Falcon. Let me know what you think...

Hot Wheels '78 Camaro Z-28:




Hot Wheels Road Racing '70 Camaro RS:




Hot Wheels Ford Falcon XB351GT:


 

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I like how your '70 Camaro RS came out especially. It's a great casting first of all, and your extra detailing without the tampos really brings it out.
 

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lookin good! takes some practice and luck with detailing these small things! i should know i have shakey hands so sometimes i just twitch and have to start a part over. what helped me a great deal is use some thinned paint(thin enough for spraying via airbrush) and if its a recessed detail you just load up the brush with paint and it will suck into the recess via capillary action...then raised details its easier to drybrush those(can google to find out the drybrush method) also to get the tampo from out of the panel lines(have no clue how they manage to get em in the panel lines) use a toothpick that has solvent of choice on the end....just some tips that worked for me. looking good for your second or so try with detailing these tiny cars! keep it up cant wait to see what else you come up with.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
lookin good! takes some practice and luck with detailing these small things! i should know i have shakey hands so sometimes i just twitch and have to start a part over. what helped me a great deal is use some thinned paint(thin enough for spraying via airbrush) and if its a recessed detail you just load up the brush with paint and it will suck into the recess via capillary action...then raised details its easier to drybrush those(can google to find out the drybrush method) also to get the tampo from out of the panel lines(have no clue how they manage to get em in the panel lines) use a toothpick that has solvent of choice on the end....just some tips that worked for me. looking good for your second or so try with detailing these tiny cars! keep it up cant wait to see what else you come up with.
Thanks for the tips. I've been using drybrushing on the 1:25 scale plastic models I build for several years now, but I'm still not very good at it. I'm better using the thinned paint technique (see the louvers at the cowl on the '70 Camaro's hood).The toothpick idea sounds great. I've just been v-e-r-y carefully scraping away at the softened tampo residue with an X-Acto knife - it's what I have handy on my worktable.

I think my next victim will be my Sublime Green SuperBird Hot Wheels. I'll be going for a factory stock look with the pant and adding a black vinyl top. I may try a wheel replacement on that one - wish me luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've been cutting and chopping on styrene plastic in 1:25 scale for a couple of decades now, so diecast metal in a smaller scale is a logical next step... Stay tuned!
 
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