Hobbyist Forums banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am working on a Mc Culloch, Pro Mac 3200-14. When given to me it was difficult to start. Once started it would only run for a few seconds. The choke needed to be closed in order to get it to briefly start. I happened to look into the cylinder and inspect the wall. I noticed what appeared to be a layer of the cylinder wall missing. I could see a silver/aluminum color which was bordered by a bluish tint. The area in question is significant in size. I suspect this would lead to a loss of compression as is would leak past the rings and contribute to the no run condition. Also, this bluish colored metal that appears to be worn away, is this a type of coating that has been scraped away due to poor lubrication? At this point I would deem this product un-repairable. Any advice regarding my findings and diagnosis would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,767 Posts
Squirt a little fuel directly in the carb, with the choke open, then try to start it, if it runs for a while you have fuel restriction, fuel line, fuel filter, primer bulb, dirty/varnished carb, air leak or blocked spark arrestor, just to name a few possibilities. Post back with your results. Have a good one. Geo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys. I have this product completely torn apart. Yes, there is a bluish tint throughout the cylinder walls. Since the damage is irrepairable I am simply going to scrap the project. The saw belongs to a friend of mine so I will inform him to just by a new one. Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I agree geo but, is it really worth it on that particular brand and model. It was brought to me in a no run condition. I suspect carb related problems as well. Even with a cleaned up/rebuilt carb, eventually the condition of the cylinder walls will eat up the rings a bit and lead to compression loss, etc. Just not sure if it is worth it on that particular saw. Don't you think? Especially since that bad spot on the cylinder wall is as big as it is. By the way, how much compression in this small engine is acceptable? With the plug installed, if I were to spin the fly wheel by hand, and it bounces back against the compression is that acceptable. As well as, if it passes thru the comp stroke by this method, I imagine this would be un-acceptable, yes/no? Let me know what you think. I appreciate the input. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,767 Posts
MST
It probably isn't worth the effort long term or if you fix them to make money. I fix them more for the challenge and for the good feeling that I took something that was supposed to be junk and fixed it, also to loan out and not be concerned or give to someone who can't afford one in any condition. Use it as a learning experience. Have a good one. Geo
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top