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Do you have a love/hate relation with any particular monster model? Say you love to build werewolf models, but just hate it when it comes time to paint the faces on them. ( thats mine cause I can never seem to get the right shading between skin and hair)

Just curious to see how many of you are out there!

Hooty
 

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Zombies!! They're a contradiction simply because they're an animated corpse. To make them realistic, there's no way they'd be able to move. They're also a pain to paint, and I have a tendency to search out reference pics for my painting. For some strange reason most of my mates think I'm a little disturbed:p.
Last weekend I showed one of my "tough" mates the reference pics for my Ramblin' Rose kit and I kid you not- he went pale and had to sit down!! Because of my sick sense of humour, I thought it was funny. He wasn't too appreciative and swore he never wants to see the kit finished!
I'll be emailing him the pics as soon as she's done.....:p

Chris.:devil:
 

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Curmudgeon
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I have a love/hate relationship with just about any figure model for the simple reason that I don't have much confidence in my painting abilities, especially when it comes to natural looking flesh tones. :rolleyes:
 

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Testures really irk me. Most of the old Aurora monsters, for example, have some sort of texture on the parts that is always lost during the sanding, filling, cleaning up phase. Frankenstein's pebbly surface is the worst, but The Creature, Kong, Godzilla... they are also really bad to deal with. I try to rebuild or replicate the surface texture as much as I can so the seams are not just big flat spots on the model.

For The Creature I found that taking Tamiya Liquid Surface Primer, and reacing into the bottom of the jar for the thick pigment with a tooth pick worked. Dab on tiny beads of the thick primer along the seam to build up some nice 3D dots. Repeat the process a few times to 1) make the dots stand up more and 2) to obscure the smoothish seams. With a coat of paint the seams, while not 100% invisible, do not stand out and draw your attention and you have to really look for them.
 

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Oxidation Genius
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Dinosaurs! Years ago, I was on a big kick buying resin and vinyl dono kits. When I got around to building the first one, I realized how agonizingly hard it is to paint them so they look realistic! I only did a couple, with about a dozen still in their boxes, taunting me.
 

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Aurora's "The Mummy" and "Bride of Frankenstien" - I hate trying to clean up and level all the seam lines on those bandages.

As for Dinosaurs, they can be painted in a "Fantasy" way, as no one has ever really seen one. i just painted one metallic Purple. It's my tribute to Ed Roth!

Speaking of Ed Roth, those car kits, especially the paper thin chrome parts, are a real pain to stop from breaking.
 

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Zombie, do you attend Wonderfest? I had an email from Dan Jorgensen of Kitbuilders magazine and he said their Friday workshop this year is going to be painting faces. I have the same problem as you so I am hoping to attend it. It does cost a bit as I recall last year when I went Friday but attended CultTVMan's workshop which cost a whole bunch less. But Dan did supply a lot of materials including a big Creature bust for the workshop.
 

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My love/hate relationship is with time. I just can't seem to find the time (or seam to find the time).

Auroranut: I hate to think what you're using as reference photos. :p Oogie!
 

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Anybody who's wearing white. That color (or rather, combination of all colors) is a pain for me because it's usually a smooth garment like Dracula's shirt front, Jekyll's lab coat, etc. White pigments tend to be coarse, for some reason, so they reveal an unwanted, grainy texture when I apply shadow colors.

What works best for me is to spray an off-white base color (Testors, mostly; Vallejo acrylics haven't worked much better). Chalk pastels are used to darken the shadows, then I fix the pastels with Dullcote. If needed I drybrush some base color to tone down the shadows, then I drybrush the white highlights. This works well enough, but I'm still not 100% satisfied.

You can see an example of how this technique came out on "Sister Deadly's" lab coat over on the AFM Monster Scenes Contest thread.
 

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Okay I love Giger's Alien and have a lot of pre-finished figures and kits.

I am having a hate relationship right now with an AMT (Ex-MPC) Alien.
I started it a year ago and chucked it back in the box. I was on vacation over the holidays and brought it back out. I want to finish kits I have started and of those I have at least two dozen.

Anyway this kit is something. I found an old review in Sci-Fi and Fantasy and the builder said it was a great fitting kit. I also found another online build that said pretty much the same. These guys must of either worked for AMT or were smoking crack!

This kit is one of the worst fitting gap ridden kits I have ever done. If a seam does fit together tightly it falls right through the detailing. That detailing consisists of alot of ridges and ribbing that has to be replaced.

I now found the first good use for a set of diamond grinding bits I bought a long time ago. I spent a week grinding one side of this beast and then smoothing and blending.

One side is about done and I still have the arms, head, back tubes and other side to rework!

Several times I thought to put it back on the shelf and pull down the half finished Halcyon Alien Warrior I have!

Might be time to go build my Hasegawa 1/32 P-47!

Max Bryant
 

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MadCap Romanian said:
I never had that problem, but setting it up to glue and then having the two pieces sag down while glueing is a pain!
My cracking problem started with the dreaded sag. I let the cape dry sagged, and then it kept cracking when I would stretch it over the model. Since both the glue joint and the seam fill were established with the cape sagged, it was difficult to unsag them.

Ah, well, if it was easy, why build models at all? lol

-Neil
 

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...I want to finish kits I have started and of those I have at least two dozen.
My brother! This could be the basis for a Cabin Fever Contest. To enter, you'd have to post a photo or two of the project as it is. Then it would have to be finished by a certain date, though I wonder if anybody would make it?

...That detailing consisists of alot of ridges and ribbing that has to be replaced...
MMax, if you're a stickler for accuracy or you just love fighting to preserve detail while filling seams, then ignore the rest of this post.

Otherwise, to hide the seams with less work, I suggest you add some detail that would compliment that which is already on the kit. This could be some stretched sprue or tiny half-round styrene strip stock from Plastruct or Evergreen. Maybe thin strips cut from ribbed sheet that matches the ribbed detail would work. There were so many variants of the Aliens, of which you only got to see brief glimpses, it would be difficult for any nitpicker to call you on the extra features.
 

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Textures really irk me. Most of the old Aurora monsters, for example, have some sort of texture on the parts that is always lost during the sanding, filling, cleaning up phase. Frankenstein's pebbly surface is the worst, but The Creature, Kong, Godzilla... they are also really bad to deal with. I try to rebuild or replicate the surface texture as much as I can so the seams are not just big flat spots on the model.

For The Creature I found that taking Tamiya Liquid Surface Primer, and reaching into the bottom of the jar for the thick pigment with a tooth pick worked. Dab on tiny beads of the thick primer along the seam to build up some nice 3D dots. Repeat the process a few times to 1) make the dots stand up more and 2) to obscure the smooths seams. With a coat of paint the seams, while not 100% invisible, do not stand out and draw your attention and you have to really look for them.
In the December 2009 edition of Fine Scale Modeler author Jim Bertges did an article on building the Moebius Invisible Man kit. The technique that he used is as follows: "I added lacquer thinner to Squadron green putty until it reached the consistency of paint (acetone-nail polish remover also works), and brushed it over the seams. Smoothing more lacquer thinner over the wet putty made sanding easier".

I am going to try it with acetone on my moebius Frankenstein, as I have some gaps in the joints on the stone wall.
This should allow the putty to flow into the seams with out needing sanding thereby preserving the detail, such as scales on the Creature or the bandages on the mummy or the Bride.. :dude:
 

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Drac,

The only trouble with using solvent-thinned putty is that when the solvent evaporates, the volume of the filler will decrease. That means the putty will shrink, which wasn't a problem with a tiny seam like that over which Mr. Berteges brushed the putty mix. Shrinkage will be a headache for larger seams, like those in your stone wall.

Allow me to suggest that you have a little lacquer thinner handy (yogurt cups are great for this sort of job) on your workbench. Putty your wall seams as best you can, then smooth the putty by brushing it with the thinner. With a little care, you should be able to approximate the surrounding stone texture.

You might have to apply more putty and smooth it again after the first application has dried. But most likely you will need to do little - if any - sanding to make your putty work match the molded detail. Careful painting can make the putty invisible.

This is the sort of job that a modeler obssesses about during construction but can't find when he/she looks at the model a month later.
 

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Drac,

The only trouble with using solvent-thinned putty is that when the solvent evaporates, the volume of the filler will decrease. That means the putty will shrink, which wasn't a problem with a tiny seam like that over which Mr. Berteges brushed the putty mix. Shrinkage will be a headache for larger seams, like those in your stone wall.

Allow me to suggest that you have a little lacquer thinner handy (yogurt cups are great for this sort of job) on your workbench. Putty your wall seams as best you can, then smooth the putty by brushing it with the thinner. With a little care, you should be able to approximate the surrounding stone texture.

You might have to apply more putty and smooth it again after the first application has dried. But most likely you will need to do little - if any - sanding to make your putty work match the molded detail. Careful painting can make the putty invisible.

This is the sort of job that a modeler obssesses about during construction but can't find when he/she looks at the model a month later.
Thanks Mark :)
 

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MMax, if you're a stickler for accuracy or you just love fighting to preserve detail while filling seams, then ignore the rest of this post. [quote]



Hi Mark,
I am somewhat of a perfectionist to a fault. Couple this with a short attention span and you can understand why so many half built kits.
I am gonna try hard this year to just build and if it's quick and dirty, oh well. At least something will be on the shelf this year!

Cheers,
Max
 

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Zombie, do you attend Wonderfest? I had an email from Dan Jorgensen of Kitbuilders magazine and he said their Friday workshop this year is going to be painting faces. I have the same problem as you so I am hoping to attend it. It does cost a bit as I recall last year when I went Friday but attended CultTVMan's workshop which cost a whole bunch less. But Dan did supply a lot of materials including a big Creature bust for the workshop.
No, I don't. I live on the west coast (Los Angeles area) so between the air fare, hotel, etc., I'd already be out an unaffordable (for me) amount of cash before I even got to Wonderfest. But thanks for the suggestion!
 

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Quote "Hi Mark,
I am somewhat of a perfectionist to a fault. Couple this with a short attention span and you can understand why so many half built kits.
I am gonna try hard this year to just build and if it's quick and dirty, oh well. At least something will be on the shelf this year!

Cheers,
Max"

Max you sound like me many started and none finished, also a perfectionist to the highest degree. I am also a model railroader and achieve perfection but when it comes to painting and filing seams I loose. :wave:
 
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