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There is a new movie out named "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Slayer." Maybe it's a Buffy prequel or something.
 

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Large Barge!

This is one I like a lot.
JL did it just about perfect, and it's cool that it was released as a '61, and a '62,
plus it came top up, top down, and in hard top form.

JL, let's see a '62 hard top, it's one we haven't seen yet! :thumbsup:
 

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I was originally going to post these photos in the "I Saw This On The Side Of The Road" thread, but I thought this thread would be just as appropriate, all things considered. My wife and I just came home from a week's vacation in Florida a couple of weeks ago. While driving northbuond on I-95 in Georgia, I spotted a car carrier up ahead, and the car on the top rack in back definitely didn't look new. As we drew closer, I asked my wife to get the camera out. I wanted a picture of that car on the transporter! She took out the camera, turned it on, and went to snap the picture as we drew alongside the truck... and the camera went dead. The batteries were out of juice. I had traffic behind me so I couldn't slow down and get behind it, and I didn't want to antagonize the trucker by just getting in front of him and slowing down to make him pass me. I hit the gas and pulled out about a mile ahead of him, then pulled off onto the shoulder were I jumped out and ran around to where I had my overnight bag in the back seat - my camera case with a couple of fresh batteries was in there, or so I thought. I couldn't find it. As the truck went by, I had one of those "Lightbulb Moments": My SmartPhone has a camera built in with nearly the same rsolution as my regular camera! I gave her my phone and said "Here, use this"! I got back on the highway, and within about five minutes we were back behind the transporter... Plan B worked like a charm, and here are the results:







Yep, that's a 1967 Continental convertible, moving effortlessly up I-95 at 65 mph in the slow lane! (I know it's a 1967 model because it's wearing a Florida vanity plate that simply reads "1967"!)
 

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Nice pics! Regarding that "Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Slayer" movie getting ready to hit the big screens, I happened to be browsing a thrift shop in Brooksville 2 days ago. There was a used book section, and there in the middle was the novel. I didn't buy it, though. I have filled up the weird story section of my library already...

But, yeah, it's based on a book by the same name. :freak:
 

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I'll take the Mercedes...

Kidding! Great tactical thinking Jim to get those pictures! :dude: Which reminds me, there is a Continental convertible of that same vintage here locally, white as well. Heck that might even be it because I know it was for sale. Used to cruise up an down Duval St. at night hauling drag queens.

There's also a '61 Cadillac Series 75 limousine around. A true factory limousine. I've seen it on the road only a couple times, but I know where it lives and sometimes the garage door is left open. I'll see if I can snap a pic next time around there.



Yep, that's a 1967 Continental convertible, moving effortlessly up I-95 at 65 mph in the slow lane! (I know it's a 1967 model because it's wearing a Florida vanity plate that simply reads "1967"!)
 

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To me (even though I wasn't even around at the time, just from my point of view today... ) the 1960's Continentals were a breath of fresh air after the styling excesses of the late 50's. The car is so smooth and understated when compared to Cadillacs of the same era. I just think it's a much more elegant look, and worlds ahead of the baroque barges carrying the Continental name from 1958-60. (Having said this, my all-time favorite Continental is STILL the timeless, Gordon Buehrig-designed Mark II of 1956-7.)
 

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I just think it's a much more elegant look, and worlds ahead of the baroque barges carrying the Continental name from 1958-60. (Having said this, my all-time favorite Continental is STILL the timeless, Gordon Buehrig-designed Mark II of 1956-7.)
For sure. I'd really Love to see one in person, just to get a feel of how special and hand built those cars are. And for such a car, they're pretty attainable price wise in contrast to say an Eldorado Brougham of the same period. I know Buehrig was on the team, though I'm not sure that he was the primary designer of the Mark II. I've read that the production design was actually the least favorite of the three designs the board had to choose from.
 

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Technically, Deusenberg never made a mass-produced dual-cowl phaeton. All Duesenberg bodies were custom-made. When you bought a Deusie, you bought the chassis, drivetrain, radiator/grille shell, fenders, hood, and bumpers. Period. You then had that much of the car drop-shipped to the body firm of your choice to have it fitted with the body of your choice, usually a one-off design. Most other high-end cars of the 1920's and 30's (Rolls-Royce, Packard, Pierce Arrow, Cord L-29, Imperial, Cadillac, Lincoln, etc), while usually sold in the same form as the Deusenberg, had a few "Off The Rack" body styles available, but not Deusenberg.

On the other hand, 4-door convertibles were out there, but they were never too common. Before the war, Ford offered one from 1934 through '38(?), and every G.M. division except for Chevrolet had one in the catalog for roughly the same time frame. Cadillac, LaSalle, and Buick had them through 1941. I believe Chrysler and Imperial offered them too.

Before the convertible era (a "Convertible" being described as a car with roll-up windows and a permanently attached folding top), there were many "Touring Cars", which were 2- or 4-door, 4+ passenger cars with folding tops and either detachable side curtains or no provision for side windows at all. T 2-door, 2- or 3-passenger version of the Touring Car" was the "Roadster". Picture an old Model T to get an idea what I'm referring to. "Touring Cars" went out of fashion by the mid 30's, but at least Ford offered a 4-door touring through 1936, as I recall. True roadsters continued up until well into the 1950's, including the first three years of Corvette production.
 

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Lincoln was the first Post War 4dr convertible.
Like Jim says, in the '30s and 40s, many were made pre-war.
They were usually refered to as "Convertible Sedans".
Buicks, Fords, many others. Fords last one was in 1940.
And yes, most were fairly low production

Dual Cowl Pheatons and Touring Cars we more 4dr roadsters, with no roll up windows.
 

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So many varieties and body styles in those days to choose, not to mention marques. It would have been impossible to sustain as history shows, but it's refreshing to see so many ideas and philosophies at work... Today you have these choices : coupe, 2-door convertible, 4-door sedan, crossover SUV, or minivan. Take your pick.
 
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