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And his name is DUST!

I just spent the last hour dusting my model collection. Filthy. I have found that canned air can mar paint perhaps from the freezing effect, and can blast decals to oblivion. I use a clean cotton T-shirt for the wide open spaces, (J-2 hull) and a Q-Tip for around the delicate parts. What a pain. and not very affective. Or is it effective? In any case, how do you all dust your pups? (not the folks who use jewel cases) It's hard to find a single case to fit the Flying Sub & stand. And I don't have the money or space to have those nice cabinets with glass doors.

My daughter semi-moved back home (for awhile :drunk:) and she is sleeping in my office on an air mattress. The dust level increased exponentially. I've read where dust is mostly composed of dead skin cells. While my daughter's hygiene is above reproach (hour long showers, etc) I think the skin cell idea is correct.

:thumbsup::confused::thumbsup:
 

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Swiffers, dust wands, window cleaner and rags(non -future items)

wash 'em off under the sink...sometimes when it's raining I'll set some on the balcony and then wipe 'em off...

Steve
 

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The Swiffer style dust wand works really really well, as long as the dust hasn't had something 'set' it like..well, various things that can vent into the air, cooking oil for one.

Really, it's somewhat frightening how so much STUFF seems to be just hanging around in the air we breathe. It's like looking at a drop of water under a microscope. You don't want to have anything to do with it! :)
 

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Swiffers, dust wands, window cleaner and rags(non -future items)

wash 'em off under the sink...sometimes when it's raining I'll set some on the balcony and then wipe 'em off...

Steve
I get "Stretch 'N Dust" cloths through work to clean large surfaces, they hold an amazing amount of dust.



For small detailed areas I have a 1 1/2 inch soft bristle paintbrush that has never been used for anything except dusting.
 

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I breathe REALLY deeply around my models- it filters the air naturally, keeping all that filthy crud off my stuff!

*cough cough*
 

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I thought "Stretch n Dust" was how to use the product....

reach waaay up there,.. use this kleenex to wipe off the moth poop...


Steve
 

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I use an old fashioned shaving brush for large surfaces, a 1" soft watercolor brush for the rest, and the canned air for inside cockpits. I occasionally find a working ejection seat that way!

Always have glue handy!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I get "Stretch 'N Dust" cloths through work to clean large surfaces, they hold an amazing amount of dust.



For small detailed areas I have a 1 1/2 inch soft bristle paintbrush that has never been used for anything except dusting.
Not to be confused with "scratch-n-sniff?"
 

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John, The canned air is a good way to find out how the decals and clear part adhesives have held up over the years....lol

Steve
 

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A little friendly advice. Doing battle with dust bunnies can be quite dangerous! Some of them carry knives....

hal9001-
 

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Most of my models are in glassed in cabinets thankfully. And the ones on a shelf in the garage get good air circulation so dust is not so much of an issue.
 

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Actually the dust we see is comprised of outside dirt in the air that comes from trees - the bark residue, and dirt that squirrels, and other animals including birds wear off that washes down when it rains, then becomes airborne on the wind, and clothing particles as well as what we track into our houses on our shoes, or feet. I don't have a grill cover at the moment, but there's a LOT of dirt from the rain, and the trees above it washing all the dirt from them, and whatever is in the air. My moms' car sits next to her neighbors' tree. It too has a lot of dirt from the rain washing down through the leaves, and the bark onto the hood, and top of the car.

There are all kinds of contaminates in the air we breathe without realizing it! Among them also is bedding which when you spread it out, or even worse when you ruffle it in the air to make it spread out, and lay on the surface evenly makes all these tiny particles from the surface that rub together in both the washer, and in the dryer that become airborne. If you doubt my words, look in your lint screen the next time you dry your clothes in the dryer. You won't see them in the washer since it's wet and they stick together.

The constant tumbling motion of fabrics rubbing together causes the very surface to abraide, or scratch very tiny hairs, or woven thread fibers to each others surface and come loose, and then become airborne when in the dryer. This same abrasion happens while you walk. Look at new clothing, or bedding the next time you go to a department store. Look at how smooth the texture is, then go home and look at your old clothing. You'll notice the surface is rough, and worn from washing, and drying over, and over again, not just from wearing. This causes these fiber surfaces which are only woven together to leave tiny hair like strands to come off the surface, and cling to other surrounding surfaces. (This is why some delicate fabrics are hang dry only) Most of what doesn't come off in the dryer becomes airborne by being laid down hard blowing the loose fibers off in a dust cloud that can't be seen by the naked eye, except in very bright sunlight. But these fibers also come off when we walk around, move, or while sleeping. Although this happens slowly, it DOES happen. There's nothing you can do about it, except wear satin, or silk clothing to minimize the problem with dust, and don't have pets, carpeting, or leave the windows in your house open.

Also worth noting: in Japan they don't wear their shoes inside. This keeps outside contaminates out such as viruses, or body fluids, as well as dirt that other people track into their homes on the bottoms of their shoes. There are ways to combat dust too. If you've ever been to a museum and noticed there's no dust - there's also no carpeting either! When your shoes rub against the carpet fibers they also release dust or dirt into the air that you can't see, except over time when the carpet gets darker than it was when new. I wash my models in clean tap water, and dish soap to remove the dust. If you really want to remove hard to get rid of dust that collects in small places - a cotton swab with dish soap on it is the only thing that I've found that is effective enough to do this without scrubbing.

I have the Davey Allison T-bird that I painted a mettalic ice blue with black tiger stripes from the 1/25 scale Arnie Beswick Pontiac GTO that got a lot of dust on it, and a little bit of it didn't want to come off. It still has a tiny amount of dust on it, but I'll clean that up before I glue it back together. I gave this to my mom for a present, but she kept in on top of her computer armoir and it fell down. Now it needs a little repair (gluing) since I wasn't heavy handed with the glue the first time around.

~ Chris​
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Actually the dust we see is comprised of outside dirt in the air that comes from trees - the bark residue, and dirt that squirrels, and other animals including birds wear off that washes down when it rains, then becomes airborne on the wind, and clothing particles as well as what we track into our houses on our shoes, or feet. I don't have a grill cover at the moment, but there's a LOT of dirt from the rain, and the trees above it washing all the dirt from them, and whatever is in the air. My moms' car sits next to her neighbors' tree. It too has a lot of dirt from the rain washing down through the leaves, and the bark onto the hood, and top of the car.

There are all kinds of contaminates in the air we breathe without realizing it! Among them also is bedding which when you spread it out, or even worse when you ruffle it in the air to make it spread out, and lay on the surface evenly makes all these tiny particles from the surface that rub together in both the washer, and in the dryer that become airborne. If you doubt my words, look in your lint screen the next time you dry your clothes in the dryer. You won't see them in the washer since it's wet and they stick together.

The constant tumbling motion of fabrics rubbing together causes the very surface to abraide, or scratch very tiny hairs, or woven thread fibers to each others surface and come loose, and then become airborne when in the dryer. This same abrasion happens while you walk. Look at new clothing, or bedding the next time you go to a department store. Look at how smooth the texture is, then go home and look at your old clothing. You'll notice the surface is rough, and worn from washing, and drying over, and over again, not just from wearing. This causes these fiber surfaces which are only woven together to leave tiny hair like strands to come off the surface, and cling to other surrounding surfaces. (This is why some delicate fabrics are hang dry only) Most of what doesn't come off in the dryer becomes airborne by being laid down hard blowing the loose fibers off in a dust cloud that can't be seen by the naked eye, except in very bright sunlight. But these fibers also come off when we walk around, move, or while sleeping. Although this happens slowly, it DOES happen. There's nothing you can do about it, except wear satin, or silk clothing to minimize the problem with dust, and don't have pets, carpeting, or leave the windows in your house open.

Also worth noting: in Japan they don't wear their shoes inside. This keeps outside contaminates out such as viruses, or body fluids, as well as dirt that other people track into their homes on the bottoms of their shoes. There are ways to combat dust too. If you've ever been to a museum and noticed there's no dust - there's also no carpeting either! When your shoes rub against the carpet fibers they also release dust or dirt into the air that you can't see, except over time when the carpet gets darker than it was when new. I wash my models in clean tap water, and dish soap to remove the dust. If you really want to remove hard to get rid of dust that collects in small places - a cotton swab with dish soap on it is the only thing that I've found that is effective enough to do this without scrubbing.

I have the Davey Allison T-bird that I painted a mettalic ice blue with black tiger stripes from the 1/25 scale Arnie Beswick Pontiac GTO that got a lot of dust on it, and a little bit of it didn't want to come off. It still has a tiny amount of dust on it, but I'll clean that up before I glue it back together. I gave this to my mom for a present, but she kept in on top of her computer armoir and it fell down. Now it needs a little repair (gluing) since I wasn't heavy handed with the glue the first time around.

~ Chris​
Holy crap. Now I want to move down to the deepest level of the Andromeda Strain clean core @ the Wildfire Project. :tongue:
 
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